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The unique composition of a mother’s breastmilk may help to reduce food sensitization in her infant, report researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine with colleagues in Canada.
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In a new survey of science research around the world, three San Diego powerhouses pulled in top ratings, according to the prestigious science journal Nature. The ratings are based on research published in 82 top scientific journals. UC San Diego came in sixth nationally among academic institutions, and 12th place worldwide. Among life sciences at academic institutions, the university finished fifth both globally and nationally.
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Researchers studying the impact of extreme climate conditions on biodiversity found a “tipping point” at which species, under pressure from dwindling food supplies due to climate change, must either evolve to take advantage of different food supplies or face extinction. Adam Siepielski, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas, and Seth Haney, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California San Diego, created a computer model to test how events like drought, flooding and heat waves affect adaptive evolution.
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Inaugural UP Summit brought together researchers and policymakers for the good of the planet
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For the first time since humans have been monitoring, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have exceeded 410 parts per million averaged across an entire month, a threshold that pushes the planet ever closer to warming beyond levels that scientists and the international community have deemed "safe." The rate of growth is about 2.5 parts per million per year, said Ralph Keeling, who directs the CO2 program at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which monitors the readings. The rate has been increasing, with the decade of the 2010s rising faster than the 2000s.
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A recent report by 30 leading scientists warned of “existential” threats to humanity posed by climate change. As coauthors of that report, we did not choose such a term lightly or with a melodramatic intent to scare people into action. It was a simple statement of scientific opinion based on more than 35 years of data: There is a risk that society could experience catastrophic extreme weather and climate events much sooner than we had anticipated, in fact, within decades. The ten campuses of the University of California under the umbrella of its carbon neutrality initiative have already developed solutions covering societal transformation, governance, market incentives, technological measures and ecosystem management to bring down emissions of climate warming pollutants to zero.
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Scientists from San Diego will visit virtually every corner of the globe during the upcoming summer field research season to take up an equally broad range of questions: Can you use the sound of bubbles exploding in ice to figure out how fast glaciers are melting? How do we refine the search for a signature of the Big Bang? How have bees evolved ways to communicate so that they can avoid predators? UC San Diego, the nation’s fifth largest research university, will send the most people packing with passports.
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UC San Diego has launched an international research collaboration to develop smart and clean transportation systems and infrastructure, with an added goal of commercializing the results. In partnership with the City of San Diego, the City of Ulsan in Korea and the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), along with numerous industry partners, the UC San Diego Smart Transportation Innovation Program will develop technological solutions to tomorrow’s transportation challenges. "We aim to make San Diego and Ulsan leaders in smart and green transportation solutions," said electrical engineering professor Sujit Dey, director of the Smart Transportation Innovation Program. The City of Ulsan is the hub of both Hyundai and Kia Motors, and the largest manufacturing city in Korea.
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David Brenner, the researcher who presided over a $1.6 billion expansion of the health sciences at the University of California San Diego, is shedding his role as dean of the medical school. Brenner will focus more on strategy, including making the campus more of a force internationally.