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Along with other scientists from the department, and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California, Swart found that changes seen in Southern Ocean temperature are directly tied to ozone depletion and human-induced greenhouse gas emissions, as opposed to regular temperature variations or responses to natural climate changes, such as volcanic eruptions or changes in the sun.Their findings were published in the scientific journal Nature Geoscience on Monday.
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UC San Diego researchers said Wednesday they've created a fingerprint scanner to capture prints of infants and children, even on the first day of birth. The device, called ION, was built to accommodate for the size, movements, and behaviors of an infant without contact to the child's finger or palm, according to Dr. Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, assistant professor of medicine at the UC San Diego School of Medicine. The device is expected to aid especially in remote or limited-resource areas of the globe, and with efforts for disaster relief, human trafficking, refugee settlement, and migration.
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If the federal government won't lead on climate change, then California, and UC, will. That's the subtext as thousands arrive for the Global Climate Action Summit.
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A series of attacks with a microwave weapon is the latest theory for what could have sickened or distressed roughly two dozen people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Cuba over the past two years. Beatrice Golomb, a professor of medicine at the University of California San Diego, is a leading proponent of the theory that pulsed microwaves could explain the symptoms. She has authored a paper that will be published in coming days in the journal Neural Computation, she said. The symptoms experienced by the Cuba patients match symptoms in other people who are “electrosensitive,” according to her analysis, which relies on the JAMA study and news reports.
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New limits on bringing highly-skilled foreign workers to the U.S. could slow innovation and reduce revenue, economists find.
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“Coral Reefs, a Challenge for Humanity,” examines the state of numerous coral ecosystems around the world, along with the circumstances—climate change, oil spills, overfishing—contributing to their decline. It is on exhibit outside the Paris headquarters of Unesco through Aug. 30 as part of this year’s International Year of Reefs, a recurring campaign to raise awareness and support for these disappearing colonies. It includes 3D coral models by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Because of human interference, there is a crisis of coral deaths, and approximately half of the shallow-water reefs on the planet have died.
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Thirteen thousand years ago, an ice age was ending, the Earth was warming, the oceans were rising. Then something strange happened—the Northern Hemisphere suddenly became much colder, and stayed that way for more than a thousand years. For some time, scientists have been debating how this major climatic event—called the “Younger Dryas”—happened. This week, a scientific team made a new claim to having found that answer. On the basis of measurements taken off the northern coasts of Alaska and Canada in the Beaufort Sea, the scientists say they detected the signature of a huge glacial flood event that occurred around the same time. “Even though we were in an overall warming period, this freshwater, exported from the Arctic, slowed down the vigor, efficiency of the meridional overturning, and potentially caused the cooling observed strongly in Europe,” said Neal Driscoll, one of the study’s authors and a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.
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A new medical research center in San Diego is embracing an innovative way to treat antibiotic resistant infections called bacteriophage therapy—phage therapy for short—which uses viruses as weapons against hard-to-treat infections. Antibiotic-resistant infections are part of a growing global health problem. Each year in the United States, at least two million people contract drug-resistant infections, and 23,000 die from those illnesses. Bacteria naturally grow resistant to the drugs used to treat them, and for people with especially tough infections that aren’t responding to the usual medications, the options are limited.
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Until now, nobody has really known what Mexican voters think about all this change. Yet those attitudes matter because the contending candidates for the presidency have outlined starkly different visions for the future. In March 2018, we ran—in tandem with The Brookings Institution, the University of California at San Diego, the global consultancy IHS Markit, and a leading Mexican newspaper, El Financiero—the first systematic poll of Mexican voter attitudes on energy reforms. This paper explains the results of the poll, key insights, and policy lessons.
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Leveraging its strengths in molecular biology, clinical research and pharmaceutical sciences, the University of California San Diego has now launched a new Center for Anti-Parasitic Drug Discovery and Development to address an unmet need in global health.