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New limits on bringing highly-skilled foreign workers to the U.S. could slow innovation and reduce revenue, economists find.
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“Coral Reefs, a Challenge for Humanity,” examines the state of numerous coral ecosystems around the world, along with the circumstances—climate change, oil spills, overfishing—contributing to their decline. It is on exhibit outside the Paris headquarters of Unesco through Aug. 30 as part of this year’s International Year of Reefs, a recurring campaign to raise awareness and support for these disappearing colonies. It includes 3D coral models by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Because of human interference, there is a crisis of coral deaths, and approximately half of the shallow-water reefs on the planet have died.
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Thirteen thousand years ago, an ice age was ending, the Earth was warming, the oceans were rising. Then something strange happened—the Northern Hemisphere suddenly became much colder, and stayed that way for more than a thousand years. For some time, scientists have been debating how this major climatic event—called the “Younger Dryas”—happened. This week, a scientific team made a new claim to having found that answer. On the basis of measurements taken off the northern coasts of Alaska and Canada in the Beaufort Sea, the scientists say they detected the signature of a huge glacial flood event that occurred around the same time. “Even though we were in an overall warming period, this freshwater, exported from the Arctic, slowed down the vigor, efficiency of the meridional overturning, and potentially caused the cooling observed strongly in Europe,” said Neal Driscoll, one of the study’s authors and a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.
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A new medical research center in San Diego is embracing an innovative way to treat antibiotic resistant infections called bacteriophage therapy—phage therapy for short—which uses viruses as weapons against hard-to-treat infections. Antibiotic-resistant infections are part of a growing global health problem. Each year in the United States, at least two million people contract drug-resistant infections, and 23,000 die from those illnesses. Bacteria naturally grow resistant to the drugs used to treat them, and for people with especially tough infections that aren’t responding to the usual medications, the options are limited.
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Until now, nobody has really known what Mexican voters think about all this change. Yet those attitudes matter because the contending candidates for the presidency have outlined starkly different visions for the future. In March 2018, we ran—in tandem with The Brookings Institution, the University of California at San Diego, the global consultancy IHS Markit, and a leading Mexican newspaper, El Financiero—the first systematic poll of Mexican voter attitudes on energy reforms. This paper explains the results of the poll, key insights, and policy lessons.
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Leveraging its strengths in molecular biology, clinical research and pharmaceutical sciences, the University of California San Diego has now launched a new Center for Anti-Parasitic Drug Discovery and Development to address an unmet need in global health.
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The unique composition of a mother’s breastmilk may help to reduce food sensitization in her infant, report researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine with colleagues in Canada.
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In a new survey of science research around the world, three San Diego powerhouses pulled in top ratings, according to the prestigious science journal Nature. The ratings are based on research published in 82 top scientific journals. UC San Diego came in sixth nationally among academic institutions, and 12th place worldwide. Among life sciences at academic institutions, the university finished fifth both globally and nationally.
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Researchers studying the impact of extreme climate conditions on biodiversity found a “tipping point” at which species, under pressure from dwindling food supplies due to climate change, must either evolve to take advantage of different food supplies or face extinction. Adam Siepielski, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas, and Seth Haney, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California San Diego, created a computer model to test how events like drought, flooding and heat waves affect adaptive evolution.