International Events

Photo By Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies
Redefining Relations for North American Prosperity
Join us for a presentation of the report by COMEXI on "Redefining Relations for North American Prosperity” that outlines a series of specific recommendations for each of the main components of the U.S.-Mexico relationship: trade, security, migration and diplomacy. Panelists: Susana Chacon is a professor at Tecnológico de Monterrey University, editorialist of the Mexican newspaper El Universal and a member of the World Academy of Arts and Sciences Luz Maria de la Mora is the country director for WEConnect International in Mexico and is also the managing director and founder of LMM Consulting Gustavo Mohar is the founder and CEO of Grupo Atalaya and has served in high-ranking positions within the Mexican Government Chairs: Ambassador Marcela Celorio, Consul General of Mexico in San Diego Rafael Fernández de Castro, Director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, UC San Diego Co-sponsored by the Consejo Mexicano de Asuntos Internacionales (COMEXI). The event will take place in the Institute of the Americas Deutz Room. Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. Please make sure to purchase a permit at the pay stations on the top level. The venue will be a short 5-minute walk from the structure.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room 10111 N. Torrey Pines Road 6856396, 920937
Event Date: Sep 18, 2017
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The Way Forward on the Korean Peninsula
Following the South Korean elections, will the U.S. face challenges with its new strategy of “maximum pressure and engagement?” This roundtable discussion will consider the Koreas’ relations with China and the U.S. in the context of ongoing developments in North Korea’s nuclear and missile program. Speakers: Ambassador Kathleen Stephens, former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea and William J. Perry Distinguished Fellow, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University Scott Snyder, Senior Fellow for Korea Studies and Director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy, Council on Foreign Relations John Delury, Yonsei University Duyeon Kim, Visiting Senior Fellow, Korean Peninsula Future Forum, Seoul Moderated by Stephan Haggard, GPS Co-sponsored by the Pacific Century Institute. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3201 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. Permits must be purchased on the top level. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy, GPS classroom 3201, International Lane, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Jun 08, 2017
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Brazil’s Future as an Energy Superpower
Join us for a lively discussion on Brazil’s energy future followed by a reception and global music performance by Sonic Impact. Even though Brazil has the potential to be one of the world’s largest energy suppliers, political uncertainties have long scared investors and hobbled the nation. In this conversation, Mauricio Tolmasquim, professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and GPS Professor David Victor will lay out where Brazil stands today, what the country’s energy future may look like, and what role Brazil will play globally in tackling energy challenges such as limiting emissions that cause global warming. This event is sponsored by GPS's Center on Global Transformation. The event will take place in The Great Hall (directions). There will be limited number of parking spaces at the Pangea Parking Structure on a first come, first serve basis. Once those are full, purchasing permits at the pay stations will be required. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to the Great Hall.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall, International Lane, San Diego, CA 92093
Event Date: May 31, 2017
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Housing Across Borders: Mexican and U.S. Housing in Perspective
Mexican and U.S. housing markets are traditionally understood to operate as discrete units, but recent housing crises on both sides of the border highlight how the people and processes that constitute these markets are actually intertwined. This conference interrogates how the U.S. and Mexican housing sectors are connected by the movement of people, money, policies, and ideas. Taking into consideration their shared histories, we propose thinking about the United States and Mexico together as a provocation that can lead us to testing our ideas about what housing and city mean. How have housing models originating in the U.S. shaped assumptions about and policy implementation in Mexico? How are the two markets linked through the movement of people and investments? Most of all, we ask the question of what can be learned by considering the connectedness of these housing markets, and through the experiences of planners, politicians, and residents in each country? This conference explores these connections by putting practitioners and interdisciplinary scholars of the U.S. and Mexico into conversation. To this end, the conference will be composed of: two traditional panels in which scholars share their work in presentation form, two roundtable discussions dealing with the panel themes, and one roundtable discussion among planners, developers, and practitioners from the San Diego-Tijuana region. The potential for connections and comparisons will be drawn out in roundtables and in informal discussions during the conference.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Malamud Conference Room 10111, N. Torrey Pines Road La Jolla, CA 920937
Event Date: May 26, 2017
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China's Ideological Spectrum
Using data from large-scale surveys in China, Jennifer Pan of Stanford University will share her findings that public preferences in ideology are not simply split along a pro-regime or anti-regime divide in authoritarian contexts. Her research indicates a possible link between China’s market reform and social divisions, and their correlations with preferences for nationalism, state intervention in the economy and social values. To understand the consequences of ideology, Pan also tested whether the expression of ideological loyalty and disloyalty among job applicants affects employment prospects among government, SOE, private and foreign firms. A reception will be held following the talk. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3201 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: GPS classroom, 3201 International Lane, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: May 25, 2017
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IT Innovations for Improving Governance in Afghanistan
Presenters Joshua Blumenstock, School of Information, UC Berkeley Michael Callen, Rady School of Management, UC San Diego The use of mobile phones and mobile money is revolutionizing finance and governance in some of the world’s poorest and most unstable countries. In this PDEL Innovations Workshop, Blumenstock and Callen will describe three projects they have been conducting in Afghanistan over the past five years that investigate ways in which development engineering can be brought to bear to improve governance: Using mobile money to pay government salaries in order to reduce corruption and promote financial inclusion Using cell phone data to get real-time measures of economic activity Adapting behavioral finance innovations to mobile platforms to promote financial inclusion The presentation will highlight the ways in which the confluence of mobile technology, financial service innovation, and big data analytics are opening up exciting new frontiers in the struggle to improve the welfare of citizens and government employees in the developing world. Free and open to the public. There will a reception following the event. FAQ What are my transportation/parking options for getting to and from the event? The SDSC Auditorium is on the campus of UC San Diego. Parking is available in the Hopkins Parking Structure and at other locations on campus. All visitors must display a valid parking permit. See http://transportation.ucsd.edu/parking/index.html for more information.

Location: San Diego Supercomputer Center Auditorium UC San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92103
Event Date: May 22, 2017
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Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy
In his newly released book "Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy,” Council on Foreign Relations Bernard L. Schwartz Senior Fellow Edward Alden explains why the political consensus in support of trade liberalization has collapsed, and how to correct the course. The U.S. has contributed more than any other nation to writing the rules that created the competitive global economy of today, helping support stronger growth in much of the world. Yet successive U.S. administrations have done far too little to help Americans succeed under those rules. Join Edward Alden as he explains more and talks about his newly released book with GPS Acting Dean Gordon Hanson, followed by a short question and answer portion and reception. This event is sponsored by GPS's Center on Global Transformation.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy, GPS Gardner Room, International Lane La Jolla, CA 92037
Event Date: May 11, 2017
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San Diego Global Forum: The Intensifying Battle for the Chinese Market
The Intensifying Battle for the Chinese Market: Emerging Opportunities and the Challenges Threatening American Businesses For decades, the world has witnessed the incredible rise of the Chinese economy and more recently, the rise of an affluent Chinese middle class, drawing investment from all corners of the world. Recently however, rising labor costs and a slowdown in economic growth are exacerbating long-standing regulatory issues, causing a shift in strategy for American businesses. Alan Beebe, President of the American Chamber of Commerce in China comes to San Diego to provide insight on the obstacles American firms continue to face in China, and what opportunities need to be taken advantage of to remain competitive in the world’s most populous country. Jack Bell, founder & CEO at Pantek Partners, will lead a Q&A session with Beebe. 5:00 PM - Registration 5:30 PM - Program and Q&A 6:30 PM - Reception

Location: Tom Ham's Lighthouse (Harbor View room), 2150 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101
Event Date: May 09, 2017
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Phantom Services: Deflecting Migrant Workers in China
As China continues to urbanize, more migrants need and expect public services. Many municipalities, however, deflect demands for benefits instead of meeting them or denying them outright, for both political and practical reasons. UC Berkeley Professor Kevin O'Brien describes how "phantom services" are politically appealing at a time when the central government is calling for greater benefits for non-locals and urging people to move to small cities while migrants continue to appear in large numbers in the biggest, most desirable cities. Presentation and Q&A will be followed by a reception. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3201 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy GPS classroom 3201 International Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: May 04, 2017
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California & Climate Change
David Hults, assistant chief counsel for the Air Resources Board of the California Environmental Protection Agency, will give a talk on "California & Climate Change: Global Leadership in the Face of National Uncertainty." He will be joined by GPS Professor David Victor. With the Trump Administration now in power, California has said it will take the lead in advancing important policy goals even if the federal government doesn’t act. This is now reflected in a range of topics — from immigration to civil rights to marijuana. Nowhere is this effort more visible than on global climate change — an area where CA has its own aggressive laws and policies and, increasingly, a global leadership role as it tries to get the rest of the world to reduce emissions. This talk will discuss what California is doing at home, the tricky legal issues that arise as one state moves in ways that may differ from federal policy and how it could affect the global picture as more nations try to implement the Paris accord. Agenda: 5–5:10 p.m. Welcome and Introductions 5:10-5:40 p.m. Presentation 5:40-6 p.m. Q&A 6-6:30 p.m. Networking Mixer

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy, GPS classroom 3201 International Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Apr 27, 2017
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Barbarians at the Gate: Corporate Takeovers & the Rise of Shadow Banking
Veteran journalist WANG Shuo and managing editor of Caixin chronicles a hostile corporate takeover war of Vanke, the largest property developer in China, that sent waves of deep shock to the entire capital market and opened eyes for those who had thought they already understood everything about the dynamics of China's financial industry. Behind the emergent corporate raiders is a seismic shift of China's financial sector, a giant shadow banking system has arisen. No one is prepared. GPS Professor Barry Naughton will moderate a discussion followed by a reception. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3201 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy GPS classroom 3201 International Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Apr 25, 2017
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QI April 2017 Monthly Mixer
Members of Calit2's Qualcomm Institute community at UC San Diego are invited to the April 2017 QI Happy Hour and Monthly Mixer on Tuesday, April 25 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in the Calit2 Theater (aka Black Box/VROOM). Meet and get to know fellow collaborators, staff, building residents and QI-affiliated researchers from across campus. At the April Mixer, you'll hear from Falko Kuester and Dominique Rissolo of the QI Cultural Heritage Engineering Initiative (CHEI) about their Bermuda 100 Challenge, an ambitious project to digitally document 100 shipwrecks and artifacts as well as culturally and naturally significant sites in Bermuda's shallow reefs. QI Program Manager (and former Mixer host) Alexandra Hubenko will also lead us through a 'guided tour' of the many QI projects she's worked on over the years. For more information or to suggest future speakers for the monthly series, contact Tiffany Fox at tfox@ucsd.edu.

Location: Calit2 Theater - Atkinson Hall
Event Date: Apr 25, 2017
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The Global Forum at International House
Join us for Spring Quarterly Conversations in Global Health Global Forum Event focusing on Climate Change from a Global and Local Perspective. Brought to you by: Global Forum, UCSD Students for Global Health, The Global Health Program and the UCSD Global Health Institute.

Location: The Great Hall
Event Date: Apr 19, 2017
Photo By UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy
San Diego Global Forum: Europe Between Brexit and the Migration Crisis
Former Prime Minister of Italy Enrico Letta, current dean of the Paris School of International Affairs at Sciences Po, will share his views on the changing priorities of the European Union with regard to the migration crisis and its shift toward foreign policy. The event will start with a talk at 5 p.m., followed by a reception at 6 p.m. It will be held in the Atkinson Pavilion at the UC San Diego Faculty Club (directions). This event is a part of the San Diego Global Forum, brought to you by GPS's Center on Global Transformation with support from Bank of America and the World Trade Center San Diego.

Location: UC San Diego Faculty Club, Atkinson Pavilion, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Apr 12, 2017
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Digital Cultural Heritage in Greece and Beyond
Date: 2017-03-27 Time: 5pm - 7pm Location: Calit2 Auditorium, Atkinson Hall, UC San Diego Guest Speaker: George Pavlidis, ATHENA Research Center (Greece) Research Director Host: CCAS Director Thomas E. Levy DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT: This special lecture by Greek engineer and research director George Pavlidis is organized by the Center for Cyber-Archaeology and Sustainability (CCAS) in the Qualcomm Institute, in which Pavlidis is an International Partner. For more than 15 years, Dr. George Pavlidis and his team at the ATHENA Research and Innovation Center in Information, Communication and Knowledge Technologies in Greece have been digitally recording, measuring, analyzing, studying and disseminating Greek cultural heritage, from antiquity to the present day. In collaboration with professor Tom Levy in the UC San Diego Department of Anthropology at UC San Diego and the UC CCAS, Pavlidis has been studying the sanctuary at Delphi, one of the most famous ancient sites in Greece. He will present the results of his research in this talk on Greece's cultural heritage. Among the questions that Pavlidis will try to answer: What is cultural heritage? Why is it important and what do we do to preserve it? How can modern digital technologies help us study, conserve, preserve and disseminate cultural heritage: and How can we all gain from digital cultural heritage, whether we are scientists, researchers, teachers or perpetual learners. This special seminar is co-organized by CCAS, the UC San Diego Division of Arts and Humanities, and the Center for Hellenic Studies in the UC San Diego Department of History. Come celebrate Greek Independence Day! SPEAKER BIO: Dr. George Pavlidis received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Democritus University of Thrace in 2005, with a dissertation on digital image processing, which earned him an Ericsson Award of Excellence in Telecommunications. Since 2001, he has worked on many R&D projects with an emphasis on multimedia systems in culture and education. Pavlidis is currently Research Director at the ATHENA Research Center, where he heads the Multimedia Research Group and the Clepsydra Cultural Heritage Digitization Center. Pavlides is also an adjunct faculty member at TEI of East Macedonia and ThraceHis research interests involve 2D/3D imaging, CBIR, multimedia technologies, human-computer interaction, intelligent user interfaces, multi-sensory environments and ambient intelligence, 3D digitization and reconstruction, 3D-GIS and mixed/augmented/virtual reality.

Location: Calit2 Auditorium, Atkinson Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: Mar 27, 2017
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Global Health challenges in the transition from infectious to non-communicable diseases
Dr. William Hancock "Global Health challenges in the transition from infectious to non-communicable diseases in low-and-middle income countries with insulin as an illustrative example" Bradstreet Chair in Bioanalytical Chemistry, Barnett Institute, and Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 12:00 – 1:00 pm Skaggs School of Pharmacy: Room 1186

Location: Skaggs School of Pharmacy: Room 1186
Event Date: Mar 23, 2017
Photo By Mark A. Rothstein
Regulation of International Direct-to-Participant Research
Date: 2017-03-21 Time: 4:30pm - 6:00pm Location: Medical Education-Telemedicine (Bldg #845)., School of Medicine, UC San Diego Guest Speaker: Mark A. Rothstein, University of Louisville Director, Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law, School of Medicine *Registration is Required. Host: UC San Diego Research Ethics Program DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT: This seminar with University of Louisville bioethicist Mark A. Rothstein is part of the Research Integrity Series at UC San Diego, supported by the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Research Ethics Program. On March 21st, the Research Ethics Program invites you to attend the fifth seminar in our Research Integrity Series, “Regulation of International Direct-to-Participant Research,” with guest speaker Mark A. Rothstein, J.D., Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Dr. Rothstein will discuss how the Direct-to-Participant (DTP) research is a novel strategy using the internet to recruit, consent, and enroll individuals. This technique is especially valuable for research on rare disorders. It can be more expeditious, generate more representative and diverse samples, be more participatory and democratic, and lead to discoveries of greater relevance for heterogeneous populations. The main impediments stem from legal, ethical, and cultural concerns about possible exploitation by foreign researchers. This talk will address whether it is possible to use DTP research in a legal and ethical manner around the world. To learn more visit the Research Integrity Series web page. The Research Ethics Program serves as a resource for the entire UC San Diego campus to identify and address ethical challenges intrinsic to the conduct of science, engineering, and other forms of academic scholarship, foster learning about research ethics, and meet federal funding requirements for education in research ethics. The Program seeks to maintain and sustain UC San Diego's success and identification as an international leader in fostering integrity in research. SPEAKER BIO: Professor Mark A. Rothstein, J.D., holds the Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine in the University of Louisville School of Medcine. He has concentrated his research on health privacy, research ethics, genetics, and public health. He serves as Department Editor for Public Health Ethics of the American Journal of Public Health and he writes a regular column on bioethics for the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics. Rothstein is Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. MORE INFORMATION: Light refreshments will be served. Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit available. *Registration is Required

Location: Medical Education-Telemedicine (Bldg #845)., School of Medicine, UC San Diego
Event Date: Mar 21, 2017
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2017 Kyoto Prize Symposium
Renowned medical scientist and recipient of the 2016 Kyoto Prize in “Basic Sciences,” Tasuku Honjo, M.D., Ph.D. will speak at UC San Diego on March 15 as part of the 2017 Kyoto Prize Symposium. Dr. Honjo has elucidated the mechanism for the functional diversification of antibodies by clarifying Class Switch Recombination and its responsible enzyme, AID. He also identified several important immunoregulatory molecules, including PD-1, whose function has led to the development of effective cancer immunotherapy. As reported by “New Scientist” magazine, Dr. Honjo’s work has initiated a historic turning point—a so-called “penicillin moment”—in the fight against cancer. The Kyoto Prize—Japan’s highest private award for global achievement—was established by the Inamori Foundation in 1985 to honor significant contributions to the scientific, cultural and spiritual betterment of humankind. The prize is presented annually in three categories: Advanced Technology, Basic Sciences, and Arts and Philosophy. For more information and to register for the free symposium, visit http://kyotoprize-us.org/.

Location: Price Center East Ballroom
Event Date: Mar 15, 2017
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Crisis of South Korean Politics and Prospects for Foreign Policy
South Korea is mired in President Park Geun Hye’s impeachment and, as a result, the 2017 presidential race has begun. Meanwhile, South Korea’s foreign policy is in disarray. The "Trump shock" has produced an uncertain future for the ROK-U.S. alliance, while inter-Korean relations have hit rock bottom. China-South Korean relations have also soured over the issue of deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD). Against this backdrop, this symposium will look into Park’s impeachment process, prospects for the presidential election, and the impacts on South Korea’s foreign policy and inter-Korean relations. Panelists: Chung-in Moon, Yonsei University Seong-ho Sheen, Seoul National University Lynn Turk, Pacific Century Institute Moderator: Tai Ming Cheung, UC San Diego It will be held in the Malamud Conference Room at the Institute of the Americas (directions). This event is hosted by the Korea-Pacific Program at GPS and the Pacific Century Institute. Co-sponsors include: East Asia Foundation, Kommon Society and Mannam.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Malamud Conference Room 10111 N. Torrey Pines Road La Jolla, CA 92037
Event Date: Mar 14, 2017
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China’s Growing Protectionism and the U.S. Response
In the Fifth Annual Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture, Ambassador Charlene Barshefsky will address China’s growing protectionism and how the U.S. is responding. China’s historic reform and opening has been the global economic story of our lifetimes, catapulting China’s economy, fueling global growth and opening vast opportunity to foreign enterprises. But in recent years, China’s economy has slowed markedly due to serious structural and social impediments, necessitating a shift in its growth model. Rather than embark upon further reform and opening as a means of recharging its economy, China has instead implemented a series of discriminatory, zero-sum policies that put foreign companies at a sharp competitive disadvantage. This approach is increasingly generating tensions with China’s trading partners – raising the question of how the U.S. and the international business community should respond. Schedule: 4:30 p.m. Reception 5 p.m. Lecture and Q&A This event is sponsored by GPS's 21st Century China Center. It is co-sponsored by the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. The event will take place in The Great Hall (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall, International Lane, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Mar 07, 2017
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Conversations on the Future of the North American Economic Partnership
Join us for a day-long set of conversations with thought leaders from policy circles, industry and academia on the future of the North American partnership. Sessions will focus on: The Future of the North American Economy The Spillovers of NAFTA: Diplomacy and Security The Road Ahead Confirmed speakers include: Alan Bersin Michael Camuñez, ManattJones Thomas d'Aquino, North American Forum Jeffrey Davidow, The Cohen Group Gerardo Esquivel, COLMEX Rafael Fernandez de Castro, ITAM Gordon Hanson, UC San Diego Beatriz Leycegui, SAI Consulting Lindsay Oldenski, Georgetown University Antonio Ortiz Mena, Albright Stonebridge Group Jaana Remes, McKinsey Global Institute Armando Ríos Piter, Movimiento Monarca Luis Rubio, COMEXI Harley Shaiken, UC Berkeley David Shirk, USD Guillermo Valdes, GEA Gustavo Vega, COLMEX This event is hosted in collaboration with Procopio, San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, Smart Border Coalition and World Trade Center San Diego. It will be held in the Malamud Conference Room at the Institute of the Americas (directions).

Location: Institute of the Americas, Malamud Conference Room 10111 N. Torrey Pines Road La Jolla, CA 92037
Event Date: Feb 27, 2017
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San Diego Global Forum: Japan-U.S. Relations Going Forward
Former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Environment in Japan, the Honorable Professor Yoriko Kawaguchi will share her views on Japanese-U.S. diplomatic relations with regard to the economy, the environment, and geopolitics and Asia going forward. Following her presentation, Professor Ulrike Schaede will lead a conversation on how these matters affect global trade and San Diego. The event will start at 4:30 p.m. with a reception and the talk will start at 5:30 p.m. It will be held in the Large Conference Room at Green Acre at Campus Pointe (directions). This event is a part of the San Diego Global Forum. It is sponsored by Bank of America. It is supported by GPS's Center on Global Transformation and Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology, as well as the World Trade Center San Diego.

Location: Green Acre Campus Pointe 10300 Campus Point Drive San Diego, CA 92121
Event Date: Feb 15, 2017
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How Should the U.S. Approach China? Bipartisan Report Launch
With a new administration in the White House, maintaining what is perhaps the country’s most crucial bilateral relationship remains a critical issue. Members of a high-level Task Force on U.S.-China Policy, organized by the 21st Century China Center at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy and Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations, will discuss their expert recommendations for the Trump administration. The event will start at 4 p.m. with a reception, and the panel and discussion will start at 4:30 p.m. It will be held in the Atkinson Pavilion at UC San Diego's Faculty Club (directions). About the report: The Task Force comprises a group of 20 prominent China specialists that include former U.S. government officials, scholars, and think tank researchers, many of whom served under both political parties and every U.S. president since the Nixon administration. The goal has been to reflect on how the U.S.-China relationship has evolved and to draft a set of recommendations for the incoming presidential administration on how the United States can best advance U.S. interests given the current political climate. We hope this report can provide the starting point for a public conversation on these vitally important questions. The report will be published and available on the Asia Society website Feb. 7, 2017. Speakers: Winston Lord was U.S. Ambassador to China 1985-89 under President Reagan. He served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs 1993-97 under President Clinton. In the 1970s he was Special Assistant to National Security Advisor Kissinger and then Director of the State Department Policy Planning Staff. During this period, he was on every China trip and attended every meeting that Presidents Nixon and Ford and Dr. Kissinger had with Mao, Zhou and Deng, and was one of two American drafters of the Shanghai Communique. Outside of government his service has included President of the Council on Foreign Relations, Co-Chairman of the International Rescue Committee and Chairman of the National Endowment for Democracy. Orville Schell is the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at Asia Society. He is a former professor and dean at the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Schell is the author of 15 books, ten of them about China, and a contributor to numerous edited volumes, including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Nation and The New York Review of Books. His most recent book is "Wealth and Power, China’s Long March to the 21st Century" with John Delury (Random House, 2013). Schell worked for the Ford Foundation in Indonesia, covered the war in Indochina as a journalist and has traveled widely in China since the mid-70s. Susan L. Shirk is Chair of the 21st Century China Center and Research Professor at UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy. She previously served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State (1997-2000) where she was responsible for U.S. policy toward China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Mongolia. She founded and continues to lead the Northeast Asia Cooperation Dialogue, an unofficial forum for discussions of security issues. Her book "China: Fragile Superpower" helped frame the policy debate on China policy in the U.S. and other countries. Her most recent book "Changing Media, Changing China" was published in 2010 by Oxford University Press.

Location: Atkinson Pavilion, UC San Diego Faculty Club San Diego, CA 92161
Event Date: Feb 13, 2017
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The Origins and Dynamics of Crony Capitalism in China
Minxin Pei is the Tom and Margot Pritzker '72 Professor of Government and directs the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at Claremont McKenna College. In this talk, he reveals compelling insights from over two hundred corruption cases involving multiple officials and businessmen from his new book “China’s Crony Capitalism.” Pei traces the origins of China’s present-day troubles to the series of incomplete reforms from the post-Tiananmen era that decentralized the control of public property without clarifying its ownership. It created a legacy of criminality and entrenched privilege that he believes will make any movement toward democracy difficult and disorderly. Schedule: 4 p.m. Lecture and Q&A 5:15 p.m. Reception This event is sponsored by GPS's 21st Century China Center. It is co-sponsored by the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3203 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy, GPS classroom 3203, International Lane, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Feb 09, 2017
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Kakehashi: Student Panel on U.S.-Japan Economic and Social Ties
Hear students’ perspectives on U.S.-Japan relations and business ties after spending eight days in Japan as part of the Kakehashi Project. The Japanese government created the Kakehashi Project to strengthen the bonds between Japan and the U.S. through personal connections, business exchange and mutual understanding. The School was fortunate to be chosen in 2016 to participate in the annual program, permitting around 20 students to travel from the U.S. to Japan. At this event, a handful of those participating students will present their experiences, impressions and ideas for the future of U.S.-Japan relations. They will particularly focus on the economic bridges that citizens of each country can build. For anyone interested in Japan or international relations, this presentation and discussion will highlight many important facets of building constructive relationships with people and businesses abroad, in Japan and elsewhere. The event will take place in the GPS Robinson Auditorium (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure.

Location: UC San Diego GPS Robinson Auditorium International Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Feb 08, 2017
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Very Close Encounters: Modern China at the Grassroots
Join us to celebrate the retirement of UC San Diego's Distinguished Professor of History and Chinese Studies Paul Pickowicz. He will recount lessons from decades of on-the-ground research on Chinese society, including gripping filmed interviews he conducted in rural China in the 1980s. Pickowicz is one of the country’s leading historians of modern China with 15 books to his credit. A true interdisciplinary scholar, his work has investigated the impact of the Cultural Revolution on Chinese peasants, the history of Chinese cinema, Cold War propaganda strategies, rural protest and Chinese soft-power initiatives. His book “Chinese Village, Socialist State” (co-authored with Edward Friedman and Mark Selden) was called “by far the best book on the impact of the Chinese Communist Party on peasant life” by The New York Review of Books. Schedule: 3 p.m. Program and Lecture by Paul Pickowicz 4 p.m. Q&A 4:30 p.m. Catered Reception This event is sponsored by UC San Diego’s Office of the Chancellor, Department of History, Institute of Arts and Humanities, Chinese Studies Program, GPS’s 21st Century China Center and the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. The event will take place at the UC San Diego Ida and Cecil Green Faculty Club's Atkinson Pavilion (directions). Registration is strongly recommended but not required.

Location: Ida and Cecil Green Faculty Club's Atkinson Pavilion, UC San Diego San Diego, CA 92093
Event Date: Jan 18, 2017
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Book talk on “La Cuarta Socialdemocracia”
Opening up about his book, “La Cuarta Socialdemocracia,” Agustin Basave will be using the USMEX stage to underscore the manuscript’s coverage of social democracy in Europe and the New Deal in the U.S., as well as the crisis of democratic representation at the time. Join the center as he draws from these developments to reflect on current events such as Brexit, U.S. elections and U.S.-Mexico relations. Agustin Basave is a congressman and former chairman of the Party of the Democratic Revolution in Mexico. He was a professor and a researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Basave previously served as an editor for the newspapers Excelsior and Reforma, while also occasionally collaborating with the magazine Nexos and the newspaper El Universal. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Oxford.

Location: Institute of the Americas' Deutz Conference Room 10111 North Torrey Pines Road San Diego, CA 92037
Event Date: Jan 18, 2017
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The Impact of Tsai and Trump on Cross-Strait Relations
Tsai Ing-wen came to power in Taiwan, pledging to pursue stability and continuity in cross-Strait relations. Beijing has responded with a cold shoulder and a cold peace. President-elect Trump broke with precedent through a phone call with Tsai and comments casting doubt on the U.S.’s long-standing “one China policy.” In this talk, Jacques deLisle, the Stephen A. Cozen Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses what do these developments imply for Taiwan’s status and security, Beijing’s and Washington’s Taiwan policies, and U.S.-China relations? Schedule: 4 p.m. Lecture 4:45 p.m. Q&A 5:15 p.m. Refreshments This event is sponsored by GPS's 21st Century China Center. It is co-sponsored by the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3203 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy, GPS classroom 3203, International Lane, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Jan 10, 2017
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China’s Energy & Environmental Challenges: Fact vs. Fiction, Moving Forward
Julio Friedmann, senior adviser for energy innovation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will share his extensive experience in collaborations and engagement in China, especially carbon capture and storage, followed by a conversation with David Victor, GPS professor and co-director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, on the future of U.S.-China collaboration on climate change mitigation and clean energy innovation. China remains the world’s largest energy user, largest emitter, largest market and largest cleantech enterprise. Following ratification of Paris, they have undertaken an ambitious set of commitments to dramatically change their energy supply, infrastructure, use and efficiency. These large efforts and commitments are backed by substantial actions and investments. At the same time, they are undercut by retractions, shifting targets, a government reform agenda and complex geopolitical forces — converting these investments into both deep decarbonization and economic growth is contingent on technological, financial and human forces. Deep reduction of pollution and GHG emissions will only be achieved through innovation, sustained government action and triumph of this agenda in a complex national context. The chance of success is hard to assess, but required for the global climate accords to have any chance of success Schedule: 4:00 p.m. Presentation by Julio Friedmann 4:45 p.m. Conversation with David Victor 5:30 p.m. Reception This event is sponsored by GPS's 21st Century China Center. It is co-sponsored by GPS's Laboratory on International Law and Regulation and the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3201 (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS. Questions? Contact Samuel Tsoi.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy GPS classroom 3201 International Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Dec 01, 2016
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Mr. Deng Goes to Washington
This riveting documentary tells the story of Deng Xiaoping's historic visit to the U.S. in 1979 that changed the trajectory of U.S.-China relations and the world. The full screening will be followed by a conversation about the historical role of Deng and U.S.-China relations post-election. Schedule: 2:30 p.m. Film Screening (bilingual narration and subtitles) 4 p.m. Panel Discussion (with English/Chinese translation) 5 p.m. Reception Panelists: Fu Hongxing, filmmaker of Mr. Den Goes to Washington, is one of the most successful documentary film directors in China. He is the former director of China’s Film Archive as well as the former deputy director of China Central Newsreel Documentary Film Studio. He is a professor and doctoral supervisor at Beijing Normal University and the executive dean of Academy for International Communication of Chinese Culture at Beijing Normal University. Zhou Zhixin, founder and publisher of Leadership ??? and 21ccom.net ???, is also the chair of newly established U.S.-China Consensus Foundation (??????). Zhou began his career at the Central Party Literature Research Office and was the leading force behind the establishment of its Central Documents Publishing House. Susan Shirk, chair of the 21st Century China Center, is one of the most influential experts working on U.S.-China relations and Chinese politics. Shirk’s book “China: Fragile Superpower” helped frame the policy debate on China in the U.S. and other countries. This event is sponsored by the GPS's 21st Century China Center. It is co-sponsored by the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China, China Focus and Chinese Students & Scholars Association. The event will take place in GPS Robinson Auditorium (directions). Closest parking will be at the Pangea Parking Structure, which will be free on Sunday. There will be signage to direct you from Pangea to GPS. All registered attendees are invited to reception following screening and panel discussion.

Location: School of Global Policy and Strategy Robinson Auditorium International Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Nov 20, 2016
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New Insights from the Brain Mapping Project in Japan
Please join Professor Hideyuki Okano, dean of Keio University School of Medicine and Dr. David Brenner, vice chancellor for Health Sciences and dean of the School of Medicine at UC San Diego for a talk on “New Insights from the Brain Mapping Project in Japan: Modeling Human Diseases with iPS cells and Transgenic Non-Human Primates.” Following the talk will be a question and answer session, and light refreshments will be served. The event is located on the UC San Diego campus in the Medical Education and Telemedicine Building, Learning Center, 1st Floor, Room 143 (directions). This event is sponsored by the UC San Diego School of Medicine and the GPS Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology and Center on Global Transformation. Questions? Contact vchsoffice@ucsd.edu.

Location: Medical Ed. & Telemed Bldg Learning Cntr, 1st Floor, Room 143, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Nov 16, 2016
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Global Warming: Current Science, Future Policy


Location: Sanford Consortium Roth Auditorium 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive La Jolla, CA
Event Date: Nov 15, 2016
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Dia de los Muertos
On Nov. 2, the center will be celebrating Día de los Muertos. Join us for altars, pan de muerto and Mexican hot chocolate! The Day of the Dead (El Día de los Muertos or All Souls' Day) is a holiday celebrated in Mexico and Latin America. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for, and remember, friends and family members who have died. Traditions include building private altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. Event is open to the public for free, but registration is required. For more information please contact usmex@ucsd.edu.

Location: Institute of the Americas Plaza 10111 North Torrey Pines Road San Diego, CA 92037
Event Date: Nov 02, 2016
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UC San Diego China Partnerships: Looking Back, Looking Forward
Paul Pickowicz, UC San Diego’s Distinguished Professor of History and Chinese Studies, presents a rare short film about UC San Diego's inaugural visit to China in 1979, just months after the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between the U.S. and the People's Republic of China. After the screening, members of the 1979 delegation will share their remembrances, followed by a look at the university’s recent collaborations with Chinese universities. The event will start at 5 p.m. with a short program and film screening in the Seuss Room at the Geisel Library (directions). At 6:30 p.m. the discussion and question-and-answer portion will begin, and conclude with a reception. Paul Pickowicz is one of the country’s leading historians of modern China with 15 books to his credit. A true interdisciplinary scholar, his work has investigated the impact of the Cultural Revolution on Chinese peasants, the history of Chinese cinema, Cold War propaganda strategies, rural protest and Chinese soft-power initiatives. His book “Chinese Village, Socialist State” (co-authored with Edward Friedman and Mark Selden) was called “by far the best book on the impact of the Chinese Communist Party on peasant life” by The New York Review of Books. Read bio online here. This event is sponsored by the UC San Diego Library and 21st Century China Center at the School of Global Policy and Strategy. Questions? Contact Samuel Tsoi.

Location: UC San Diego Geisel Library Seuss Room 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA
Event Date: Nov 01, 2016
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CHINA Town Hall: Sino-American Relations
China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of just about everyone in the U.S.. CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming designed to provide Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts. Henry A. Kissinger will be the national webcast speaker. He was the U.S. national security advisor (1969-1975) and secretary of state (1973-1977), when he played a crucial role in arranging President Nixon’s 1972 groundbreaking visit to China, which opened the door to the re-establishment of U.S.-China relations. Melanie Hart, UC San Diego alumna and director of China Policy at the Center for American Progress, will be our local speaker. She focuses on U.S. foreign policy toward China and works to identify new opportunities for bilateral cooperation, particularly on energy, climate change and cross-border investment. This event is sponsored by the 21st Century China Center. It is cosponsored by the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China and The Bishop's School.

Location: The Bishop's School - 7607 La Jolla Boulevard, San Diego, CA 92037
Event Date: Oct 18, 2016
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Sokwanlok Distinguished Lecture: “China’s Governance in Transition"
In the second Sokwanlok Distinguished Lecture on China, YU Keping, a renowned scholar and advocate of reform in China will address the great changes in governance since the economic reform. He will trace the principal lines of governance reform in China since the 18th Party Congress and assess the main challenges going forward. The event will start at 4:30 p.m. with a reception at the patio of Bella Vista Cafe. At 5 p.m. the lecture and question and answer portion will be at the Sanford Consortium Auditorium. Pacific Leadership Fellow YU Keping is the dean of the School of Government at Peking University. He has continued to be a stable voice in Chinese academia, as well as a strong advocate for democratization and rule of law from within the establishment—his book “Democracy is a Good Thing (2009)” relaunched an intellectual debate on the future of China’s political system and democratization. This event is sponsored by the 21st Century China Center. It is cosponsored by the Center for Global Transformation and Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. Reserved parking available at Sanford Consortium at first-come first-serve basis.

Location: Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine - 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, San Diego, CA 92037
Event Date: Oct 10, 2016
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Biomedical Research: Lessons from Global Health
Sir Tadataka Yamada, the former director of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Global Health Program, will discuss key global health issues and current trends of biomedical research and its impact. The event will start at 5 p.m. with a reception at the patio of Bella Vista Cafe. At 6 p.m. the talk and question and answer portion will be at the Sanford Consortium Auditorium. Sir Tadataka Yamada guides and advises portfolio management and company creation in the life sciences at Frazier Healthcare Partners. Before his current role, Sir Yamada was the chairman of research and development at GlaxoSmithKline, the director of Global Health at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, as well as chief scientific officer at Takeda Pharmaceuticals in Tokyo. Sir Yamada has emphasized the power of partnerships in health care between large pharmaceutical companies and philanthropic foundations. While at the Gates Foundation, he oversaw massive development in infectious disease immunization as well as in maternal-child healthcare. Read bio online here. Discussant: Ulrike Schaede is director of the Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology, executive director of the Center on Global Transformation, and professor of Japanese Business and head of the International Management Track at GPS. As a Japan expert, her research interests are Japan’s corporate strategy, business organization and management, regulation, financial markets, HR practices and entrepreneurship. Read bio online here. Parking is provided for event guests at the East lot of Sanford Consortium. There will be signage from North Torrey Pines Road to direct you. Please find the part of the lot that is designated as Event Parking. No validation or permit for event guests will be required. This event is sponsored by the Center on Global Transformation and cosponsored by the Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology. Questions? Contact Lisa Lee.

Location: Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive San Diego, CA
Event Date: Oct 05, 2016
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U.S.-Japan-Korea Relations: Looking Forward
The U.S., Japan and Korea share a number of common strategic interests, including security challenges posed by North Korea and the changing landscape associated with China’s rise. Yet the two American allies also have faced stresses related to a variety of issues, from history to territorial questions and divergent views of the regional landscape. In this panel, three well-known experts discuss the future of the triangular relations between the U.S. and its two Northeast Asian allies in the wake of the fifth North Korean nuclear test. Speakers: T. J. Pempel is Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science in UC Berkeley's Department of Political Science. Pempel's research and teaching focus on comparative politics, political economy, contemporary Japan and Asian regional ties. Myung-hwan Yu is a former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade of South Korea. He served as Korea's Ambassador to Israel, Japan and the Philippines. Akihiko Tanaka is a professor of international politics at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia (IASA) at the University of Tokyo. Tanaka's specialties include theories of international politics, contemporary international relations in East Asia and Japan’s foreign policy. Moderator: Stephan Haggard is the Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, director of the Korea-Pacific Program and distinguished professor of political science at the School. The event will take place in GPS classroom 3201 (directions). Questions? Contact Lisa Lee. This event is sponsored by the Korea-Pacific Program at GPS and the Asia Research Fund and the Pacific Century Institute. WHEN Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 5:00 PM to 6:30 PM (PDT) WHERE UC San Diego - School of Global Policy and Strategy Classroom 3201, La Jolla, CA 92093

Location: UC San Diego - School of Global Policy and Strategy Classroom 3201, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Sep 22, 2016
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San Diego and the Trans-Pacific Partnership: Partners in Prosperity
World Trade Center San Diego and Qualcomm invite the public to attend a special event to learn how the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) will impact the San Diego economy.

Location: Qualcomm Theater - 5775 Morehouse Drive, San Diego, CA 92121
Event Date: Aug 03, 2016
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Christianity in China: Globalization and Localization
Date: July 12, 2016 Time: 4-5:30 p.m. Location: Village West, Building 1, Meeting Rooms on Fifteen, Room A, UC San Diego A panel of experts from the People's Republic of China and the U.S. will discuss the Chinese government's new regulations on religion and their implications for Christian communities, focusing on the interplay between the globalization and localization processes of Christianity in China. It will be moderated by Professor Richard Madsen, a pioneering sociologist on the study of religion in China and director of the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China. Panelists include: • Dr. Zhuo Xinping, Institute of World Religion, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences • Fr. John Zhang, Beifang Jinde Catholic Service Center • Ms. Amy Lillis, Secretary's Office of Religion and Global Affairs, U.S. Department of State • Fr. Rob Carbonneau, United States Catholic China Bureau Organized by: Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China, UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS); Center on Globalization and Religious Studies, Fudan University; 21st Century China Program, GPS; with co-sponsorship from the Asia Research Center

Location: Village West, Building 1, Meeting Rooms on Fifteen, Room A
Event Date: Jul 12, 2016
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How Arab Oil Exporters And Importers Can Benefit From Low Oil Prices
Shantayanan Devarajan, Chief Economist, World Bank’s Middle East and North Africa Region presents “How Arab Oil Exporters And Importers Can Benefit From Low Oil Prices”, at 7:30 am Thursday, July 7 at the UC San Diego Faculty Club. Discounts are available for UCSD Faculty, Staff, Students, and Alumni. Shantayanan Devarajan is the Chief Economist of the World Bank’s Middle East and North Africa Region. Since joining the World Bank in 1991, he has been a Principal Economist and Research Manager for Public Economics in the Development Research Group, and the Chief Economist of the Human Development Network, South Asia, and Africa Region. He was the director of the World Development Report 2004, Making Services Work for Poor People. Before 1991, he was on the faculty of Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. The author or co-author of over 100 publications, Mr. Devarajan's research covers public economics, trade policy, natural resources and the environment, and general equilibrium modeling of developing countries. Born in Sri Lanka, Mr. Devarajan received his B.A. in mathematics from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Location: UC San Diego Faculty Club
Event Date: Jul 07, 2016
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Rethinking the Informal Economy: An analysis of the Tianguis in Mexico City
Seminar: Rethinking the Informal Economy: An analysis of the Tianguis in Mexico City Thursday, 6/2/2016, 2-3:30 PM, Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas, UCSD The concept of “informal economy” was created in the 1970’s, and since then debates about its definition, measurement, origin, causes and solutions has never ceased. This phenomenon of “informality” has become a normal reality all around the world. In Mexico the Tianguis, an open-air market that can be traced back to pre-Columbia times, is one of the most important economic and sociocultural activities of the informal sector. A Tianguis in Mexico City usually has a self-organized system that, distinct from our stereotypes of the informal economy, creates order out of chaos. Whether that self-organization is forced by circumstances or develops on its own initiative, how people engage and conduct their daily life to make a living in this Tianguis reflects the reality of Mexican society and provides us with insights on how to approach the nature of the informal economy. Speaker: Visiting Graduate Student, Yin Li of Tsinghua, University in Beijing Sponsored by the Center for Iberian & Latin American Studies (CILAS)

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Jun 02, 2016
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Living with the Holocaust: Featuring Tom Segev
Presented by the UC San Diego Holocaust Living History Workshop Sponsored by William & Michelle Lerach & Jeffrey & Marcy Krinsk Please join us for a presentation with prominent Israeli historian Tom Segev on Wednesday, June 1, 2016 from 5:30 - 7:00 PM in the Atkinson Hall Auditorium on the UC San Diego campus. Refreshments will be served prior to the presentation starting at 4:30 PM. This event is free and open to the public. Tom Segev, a prominent Israeli historian, author, and journalist and a leading figure among the so-called New Historians, has challenged many of the country’s traditional narratives or “founding myths.” Born in Jerusalem to parents who fled Nazi Germany, Segev has been praised for his unflinching look at Israel’s history and tortured attempt to come to terms with the Holocaust. His books include: The Seventh Million: The Israelis and the Holocaust (2000); One Palestine, Complete: Jews and Arabs Under the British Mandate (2000); 1967: Israel, the War, and the Year That Transformed the Middle East (2006); and Simon Wiesenthal: The Life and Legends (2010). For more information about historian Tom Segev, other events in the Holocaust Living History Workshop, and parking for this event please click here.

Location: Atkinson Hall Auditorium - UC San Diego Campus 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0175
Event Date: Jun 01, 2016
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Global Drug Decriminalization & Tijuana’s HIV/AIDS Epidemic
Join UC San Diego’s Global Health Institute and the Open Society Foundation as we welcome Sir Richard Branson. Sir Branson is a world-renowned business magnate, investor, and philanthropist. Recently, he has turned his creative energy on the decriminalization of drugs worldwide, teaming up with the United Nations and the Global Commission on Drug Policy to revise the current harmful policies. We invite you to participate in the screening of the documentary “Breaking the Taboo,” followed by a panel exploring how decriminalization would affect the spread of HIV in Tijuana with critical dialogue surrounding this issue. Introduction by UC San Diego’s Health Sciences Vice Chancellor, Dr. David Brenner Sir Richard Branson, Global Commission on Drug Policy and founder, Virgin Group Jon Cohen, Author, Tomorrow is a Long Time Dr. Steffanie Strathdee, Director of the Global Health Institute and an infectious disease epidemiologist; Moderator Dr. Patricia Gonzalez-Zuniga, Research Coordinator for El Cuete *all proceeds from the event will go to the free clinics in Tijuana. **Attendance limited to 150 registrants. WHEN Wednesday, June 1, 2016 from 11:30 AM to 2:00 PM (PDT) WHERE UC San Diego's Great Hall - 9500 Gilman Drive #0550, La Jolla, CA 92093

Location: UC San Diego's Great Hall - 9500 Gilman Drive #0550, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Jun 01, 2016
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Running a Bank in China
Date: May 26, 2016 Time: 5-6:30 p.m. Speaker: Ken Wilcox, emeritus chairman, Silicon Valley Bank How is Chinese economic growth financed? GPS Associate Professor Victor Shih will host a conversation with Wilcox to get an inside look at how banking practices have evolved in a state-dominated financial system and firms' adaptiveness to recent financial crises. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsor: Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China

Location: GPS room 3201, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 26, 2016
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Sea-Level Rise in Public Science Writing: History, Science, and Reductionism
THE TRANSDISCIPLINARY ECOCRITICISM REASEARCH GROUP presents A Talk by SUSANNA LINDSTROM In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain the threat of rising seas to the public. In this talk Susanna Lidstrom critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favor of fast-paced but de-contextualized events. Lidstrom’s presentation argues that both these frames de-politicize sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant social, cultural and ethical considerations. As examples of climate reductionism, these depictions may obstruct rather than facilitate appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise. Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Department of Literature

Location: De Certeau Room 155 Department of Literature
Event Date: May 26, 2016
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Barrio Redevelopment from an Asian Perspective: The Case of Barrio Logan
Numerous ethnic enclaves have thrived for a long time in the United States. However, in recent decades, many of them have suffered an inexorable decline and have become neighborhoods of nostalgia, losing their original identity as the consequence of modern gentrification and the creation of middle-class enclaves. The local Chicano community in Barrio Logan has struggled constantly to maintain a vibrant ethnic neighborhood for almost a hundred years. But the ongoing redevelopment and expansion of downtown San Diego has brought many changes to the barrio, and the community is now rising against the gentrification. This talk seeks to explore how the Mexican-American community in Barrio Logan preserves the barrio identity and survives the impacts of contemporary urban progress. Speaker: Visiting Scholar, Yuening Hu of the Central Compilation and Translation Bureau of the Central Committee in China Sponsored by the Center for Iberian & Latin American Studies (CILAS)

Location: Deutz Room Institute of the Americas, UCSD
Event Date: May 19, 2016
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Will the Latino Vote Choose the Next President?
Speakers: Dan Restrepo, senior fellow, Center for American Progress; Ruben Barrales, president and CEO, Grow Elect; and Sandra Pérez, national director of civic engagement, NALEO Educational Fund; Moderator: Thad Kousser, professor, UC San Diego As the election for the most powerful office on the planet draws near, suspense heightens over how the Latino vote will sway the occupancy of the next president of the U.S. In this panel discussion, Dan Restrepo, Ruben Barrales and Sandra Pérez will provide an analysis of the projected election outcomes, including how the Latino population will vote in California and nationwide, and offer a fresh examination of the role of Latinos in this election. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsor: Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies

Location: Roth Auditorium, Sanford Consortium
Event Date: May 18, 2016
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Thinking Locally: An Alternative Perspective of Public Security in Mexico
The Center on Global Transformation at the School of Global Policy and Strategy is hosting an event titled “Thinking Locally: An Alternative Perspective of Public Security in Mexico.” When: May 17 at 5 p.m. Where: Malamud Conference Room at Weaver Center, Institute of the Americas Speaker: Pacific Leadership Fellow Edna Jaime, Director General, México Evalúa; Moderator: Professor Craig McIntosh Mexico needs a cutting-edge generation of security policies driven by a “local” rationale, comprising accurate information, evidence-based diagnostics and targeted to design territorially delimited policy interventions. Edna Jaime, Director General of México Evalúa, will elaborate on this topic during her talk, followed by a discussion moderated by GPS Professor Craig McIntosh. A reception will be held following the talk. For speaker bios, more information and registration, please visit https://thinking-locally.eventbrite.com

Location: Malamud Conference Room at Weaver Center, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: May 17, 2016
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Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Japan
The Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology at the School of Global Policy and Strategy is hosting a two-day research conference titled “Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Japan.” When: May 5 – 6 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Where: Malamud Conference Room at Weaver Center, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego This joint two-day research conference between JFIT, Santa Clara University, The University of Tokyo, and Stanford University, focuses on Japan’s current innovation dynamics. The conference convenes academics and practitioners to explore, analyze and evaluate the current situation of venture capital, entrepreneurship and corporate renewal and reorganization in Japan. How is innovation in large and small companies evolving in Japan, and what are the biggest differences in regulatory and institutional parameters between Japan and the U.S. in fostering innovation? It is open to the public to attend. Speakers include faculty from UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, Santa Clara University, The University of Tokyo, Hitotsubashi University, Hosei University, Tohoku University, Boston University and Arizona State University, as well as representatives from Japanese companies and Silicon-Valley and San Diego-based angel and venture investors.

Location: Malamud Conference Room at Weaver Center, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: May 05, 2016
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A Tale of Secrecy and Democracy: Civilians and the Management of Military Documents in Brazil
What are the thresholds of transparency in defense in Brazil? It is always challenging to analyze defense transparency and security matters since in many cases secrecy is needed to undertake some policies. However, this is exactly the reason why we should deeper analyze this topic: the need for secrecy can be easily used to hide inefficiency and illegal behaviors. The challenges of achieving an appropriate level of transparency in these matters are especially daunting in Latin America. The general interest of politicians in defense has historically been low, either because of the legacy of dictatorships, or because of the region’s perceived lack of external threats. This seminar analyzes the de jure possibilities of civilian access to military records in Brazil in contrast with some de facto practices, and illustrates how the illusions of transparency take place in this labyrinth of regulations. Speaker: Visiting Graduate Student, Karina Rodrigues of the Getulio Vargas Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Sponsored by the Center for Iberian & Latin American Studies (CILAS)

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas, UCSD
Event Date: May 05, 2016
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Asian Internet companies and the global IT industry dynamics: A conversation between Eric Gan and Peter Cowhey
Asian IT and Internet firms, as well as Internet-based consumer-oriented services, now dwarf the U.S. market. This has created a new competitive dynamic in the global IT industry and its associated providers, producers and startup activities in the software, shopping, games, social media and other industries. Meanwhile, regulatory restrictions as well as privacy concerns loom large. How is this industry shaping up, and what do we need to know to understand its dynamics? In this presentation, Pacific Leadership Fellow Eric Gan, executive vice president and director of SoftBank Corp., meets with GPS Dean Peter Cowhey for answers. A reception will be held following the talk. Co-sponsors: Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology and The Global Forum at International House

Location: The Great Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 04, 2016
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Foucault, Spirituality and the Perils of Universal History: The Arab Spring through the Prism of the Iranian Revolution
Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi is Associate Professor of Sociology and History and the Interim Director of the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of “Islam and Dissent in Postrevolutionary Iran” (2008) and a book of stories entitled “Remembering Akbar: Inside the Iranian Revolution” (O/R Books, April 2016). His forthcoming book, “Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment,” will be released in August 2016 by the University of Minnesota Press. Sponsored by UC San Diego Department of Literature, Third World Studies, Religion, Persianate Lecture Series, Middle East Program, and Revolutions and their Aftermaths – Center for the Humanities research group.

Location: Literature Bldg., Room 155
Event Date: Apr 21, 2016
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Unsettled: The Refugee in the Hyperghetto
Scholar-activist Eric Tang will explore themes from his new book, Unsettled: Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto, including the relationship between immigrant communities and African Americans as they experience common and distinct forms of state violence taking shape in America’s inner cities. Tang’s research sits at the intersection of two issues that define the current moment: the international refugee crisis and the resurgent movement against police violence in the urban United States. This event is co-sponsored by: UC San Diego Center for the Humanities, Ethnic Studies Department, History Department, and the Sociology Department

Location: Cross Cultural Center, Comunidad Room
Event Date: Apr 07, 2016
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Do Bad Times Make Good Economic Policy?
Date: April 6, 2016 Time: 5 – 6:30 p.m. Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall Presenter: Pacific Leadership Fellow Muhamad Chatib Basri, Former Minister of Finance, Indonesia In 2013, the Indonesian economy was hit by series of global shocks, including the tapering of U.S. Quantitative Easing, China's economic slowdown and the end of the commodity super-cycle. This pushed Indonesia to launch policy measures that were not easy politically. It also raised the perplexing question: Why do technocrats play an important role only when an economic crisis strikes? This presentation will examine internal debates regarding the political economy of managing Indonesia's economy in a difficult global context, as well as their relevance for other countries facing similar challenges. A reception will be held following the talk. Co-sponsor: The Global Forum at International House

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall
Event Date: Apr 06, 2016
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What Does NAFTA Have to Teach Us about the Trans-Pacific Partnership?
Presenter: Antonio Ortiz-Mena, Senior Advisor at Albright Stonebridge Group and and Pacific Leadership Fellow at the Center on Global Transformation (CGT); Moderator: Gordon Hanson, Director, CGT The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was a pioneering treaty, marking the first time a developing country and two developed countries had agreed to undertake intensive market integration. Two decades later, the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) would deepen commitments under NAFTA and break new ground in how countries manage trade. In this lecture, Ortiz-Mena will discuss the lessons that NAFTA holds for the implementation of TPP. Recognizing that trade agreements generate both winners and losers, he will address how government, business and civil society can work together to maximize the gains and minimize the losses from expanding trade. A reception will be held following the talk. Organized by: Center on Global Transformation (CGT); Hosted by DLA Piper LLP.

Location: DLA Piper LLP: 401 B Street, Suite 1700, San Diego, CA 92101
Event Date: Mar 30, 2016
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"The Changing Geopolitics of East Asia" The Fourth Annual Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture
Speaker: Ambassador J. Stapleton (Stape) Roy, Distinguished Scholar and Founding Director Emeritus, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Stapleton Roy's ambassadorial assignments included Singapore, China and Indonesia. In this talk, he will discuss the implications for the U.S. of the gradual erosion in its air and sea dominance in the Western Pacific caused by China's rapid military modernization. He will also examine the factors that limit China's ability to dominate the region, including the difficulties China's leaders encounter in seeking to preserve the essentials of an authoritarian system in a country that is too open to the outside world, both politically and economically, to make this feasible over time. This event is co-sponsored with the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China.

Location: Atkinson Pavilion, UC San Diego Faculty Club
Event Date: Mar 28, 2016
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Kyoto Prize Symposium featuring Michel Mayor
Prominent astrophysicist Michel Mayor received the 2015 Kyoto Prize--Japan's highest private award for global achievement--in the area of "Basic Sciences" for his pivotal contributions in astrophysics, including the discovery of the first extrasolar planet orbiting a Sun-like star. He will speak about his accomplishments and answer questions as part of the special Kyoto Prize Symposium presentation.

Location: Price Center West
Event Date: Mar 16, 2016
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UC San Diego - Kyoto University Joint Symposium
The 2nd UC San Diego – Kyoto University Joint Symposium will convene in La Jolla, California on March 14-15, 2016. The Program will consist of a Plenary Session during the first day followed, on the second day, by three breakout sessions. These breakout sessions will focus on Regenerative Medicine and Biology; Cancer & Drug Development; and Advanced Energy Research. The highlight of the meeting will be keynote presentations by Professor Shinya Yamanaka, the 2012 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine, and Professor Roger Y. Tsien, the 2008 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. Join us at the 2nd UC San Diego – Kyoto University Joint Symposium to learn about the cutting-edge research and translational endeavors at the two prominent universities and network with eminent investigators in the fields of regenerative medicine and biology, cancer, drug development, and advanced energy research.

Location: UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Event Date: Mar 14, 2016
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International Women's Day 2016
Each year on March 8th, thousands of events are held throughout the world to inspire women and celebrate achievements. A global web of rich and diverse local activity connects women from all around the world ranging from political rallies, business conferences, government activities and networking events through to local women's craft markets, theatric performances, fashion parades and more. Year over year IWD is certainly increasing in status. So make a difference, think globally and act locally!!

Location: Student Services Center, Multipurpose Room
Event Date: Mar 08, 2016
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South Korea, China and the U.S.: Moving Forward
Panelists: Sung-Hwan Kim, former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade for the Republic of Korea; Kathleen Stephens, former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea; Chung-in Moon, distinguished professor at Yonsei University and member of South Korea’s Presidential Committee on Unification Preparation Moderator: Stephan Haggard, director of the Korea-Pacific Program at GPS South Korea has complementary strategic and economic interests with both China and the U.S. However, it also faces difficult political choices with the two countries on a range of issues, including economic integration to North Korea, ballistic missile defenses and human rights. Join this discussion of evolving trilateral relations between the U.S., China and South Korea co-hosted by the Korea-Pacific Program at the UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS) and the East Asia Foundation in collaboration with the 21st Century China Program and the Pacific Century Institute.

Location: GPS Auditorium, UC San Diego
Event Date: Mar 03, 2016
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COP21 Paris and Beyond
"COP21 Paris and Beyond: Outcomes and Future Directions" Date: March 2, 2016 Time: 4 – 6 p.m. Location: Sumner Auditorium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego Join us for presentations and a discussion with David Victor, professor of international relations at the UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS), and student delegates from GPS and Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) who attended the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). They will comment on outcomes from the Paris climate negotiations and the road ahead. This event is sponsored by The Environmental Policy and Business Forum, a GPS graduate student program of Net Impact. It is cosponsored by the SIO Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, the UC San Diego Center for the Humanities and El Colegio de la Frontera Norte.

Location: Sumner Auditorium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego
Event Date: Mar 02, 2016
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Reporting from China
Speaker: David Barboza, Shanghai-based correspondent for The New York Times In this talk, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Barboza from The New York Times will share the fascinating story of how he does investigative reporting inside China. Bio: David Barboza has been a Shanghai-based correspondent for The New York Times since November 2004. He was a freelance writer and a research assistant for The New York Times before being hired in 1997 as a staff writer. For five years, he was the Midwest business correspondent based in Chicago. Since 2008, he has served as the paper’s Shanghai bureau chief. In 2013, Barboza was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting “for his striking exposure of corruption at high levels of the Chinese government, including billions in secret wealth owned by relatives of the prime minister, well documented work published in the face of heavy pressure from the Chinese officials.” He was also part of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. Barboza has won numerous other awards in his journalistic career, including The Times’s internal business award, the Nathaniel Nash Award, and the Gerald Loeb Award for business reporting. Parking: Please be advised that there will be limited parking for this event in the EAST parking lot at Sanford Auditorium. No permit will be required in the designated event spots. All other spots will require attendees to purchase permit. There will be pedestrian signage from the parking lot to the auditorium.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Roth Auditorium
Event Date: Mar 01, 2016
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The Center for Iberian & Latin American Studies, UCSD
The opening of the Brazilian Amazon to colonization in the 1970s brought cattle, land conflict, and widespread deforestation. In the remote state of Acre, Brazil, rubber tappers fought against migrant ranchers to preserve the forest they relied on, and in the process, these “forest guardians” showed the world that it was possible to unite forest livelihoods and environmental preservation.

Location: 3 PM, Deutz Room, Copley Building, Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Dec 10, 2015
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Understanding China's New Normal
Speaker: Qian Yingyi (???), Professor, Department of Economics and Dean, School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University As China's economic growth rate has declined to 7.5% in 2014 from its recent historic average of 9.8%, the once unstoppable economy is said to have entered a “new normal.” This new paradigm is forcing China's leaders to face a series of new and vexing questions: How to increase the quality of growth and make substantive reforms to the growth model? What will be the spillover effects of this slower growth? Yingyi, one of China's foremost economists, will help navigate the future of China's economy during this talk. A reception will be held prior to the talk.

Location: UC San Diego Faculty Club, Atkinson Pavilion
Event Date: Dec 08, 2015
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The Prospects for Unification on the Korean Peninsula
In 2014, South Korean President Park Geun-hye established a Presidential Committee for Unification Preparation (PCUP). In this public event, three members of the Committee will provide their views on the status of President Park's Trustpolitik, the future of North-South relations and the current state of the North Korean economy.

Location: GPS Auditorium 4:30pm
Event Date: Dec 07, 2015
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Why the China Model Works
Westerners tend to divide the political world into “good” democracies and “bad” authoritarian regimes. But the Chinese political model does not fit neatly in either category. Over the past three decades, China has evolved a political system that can best be described as “political meritocracy.”

Location: UC San Diego Social Sciences Building Room 107
Event Date: Dec 01, 2015
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Ecological Civilization and Eco-social Transformation in China
Chen Kegong (???) is a professor of glaciology and cryopedology and president of Northwest Normal University. From 2008 – 2013, he served as mayor of the Municipal Government of Zhangye City.

Location: UC San Diego, Village West, Building 1, Meeting Rooms on Fifteen, Room A
Event Date: Nov 17, 2015
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Are the U.S. and China Headed Toward a New Cold War?
In the wake of Xi Jinping's visit to the U.S., three of the world's preeminent experts on China and the U.S.-China relationship will offer an in-depth analysis of what ails relations between the two countries

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Nov 13, 2015
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San Diego Global Forum
With new leadership, U.S.-China relations are at a critical juncture. From military ties to the business environment for U.S. companies operating in China, many are concerned that the status quo has now changed for the worse. To make sense of where the U.S.-China relationship is heading – and why that matters for our region’s competitiveness – a panel of world-renowned experts from the UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy will explain the causes for worsening relations and suggest ways that the two sides can overcome these frictions.

Location: San Diego Public Library Auditorium
Event Date: Nov 10, 2015
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Faculty Research Lectures
Critical Refugee Studies: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refuge(es) Yen-Le Espiritu, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies November 4, 2015, 2:00 - 4:00 pm The Ida & Cecil Green Faculty Club

Location: The Ida & Cecil Green Faculty Club
Event Date: Nov 05, 2015
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Singapore's Emerging Role as Asia's Innovation Hub
World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report and Global Innovation Index have consistently ranked Singapore as one of the most competitive and innovative economies in the world. A large part of Singapore's high innovative capacity can be attributed to the country's ability to attract foreign firms and superior talent, and to leverage its business-friendly and intellectual property-protective environment.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Roth Auditorium
Event Date: Nov 04, 2015
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Recapturing the Mexico Moment
An occasion for business leaders, civil society, scholars and policymakers to discuss Mexico’s progress and future direction, this year’s symposium will include three breakout sessions. The sessions will cover topics from recapturing the “Mexico Moment” to the progress and pitfalls of structural reforms and the transformation of civil society.

Location: 9500 Gilman Drive #0519 La Jolla, CA 92093-0519
Event Date: Oct 30, 2015
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Capital in the Twenty-First Century with Thomas Piketty
Listen to experts from several fields at UC San Diego and other leading universities discuss the issues this book raises about the causes of economic inequality over time and across different countries. They will explore the concentration of wealth, the consequences for economic growth, the implications for social mobility and the effects on public policy and politics. Join us as they answer the most pressing questions raised by this research, including should we be troubled by these developments and what can we do about them?

Location: Multipurpose Room, Student Services Center UC San Diego Rupertus Lane San Diego, CA 92161
Event Date: Oct 22, 2015
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“Climate Change and U.S. Energy Consumption”
Climate change is a phenomenon that has acquired great relevance in recent decades, mainly due to its negative impact on the entire international community. This phenomenon has intensified as a result of significant emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), primarily from the excessive use of fossil fuels that are necessary for contemporary development and progress. It is a problem that demands a prompt and comprehensive response from all political, economic and social sectors globally, especially by the United States, the current hegemon. The U.S. has to carry out efficient international actions to mitigate this problem, because this country is one of the two main consumers of fossil fuels and polluters worldwide. The U.S. still has an energy policy that relies heavily on hydrocarbons. There are also governmental and non-governmental actors involved in the formulation of the U.S. climate change policy that have interests which have influenced the U.S. to not ratify international agreements seeking to mitigate this global problem. It is also important to examine the 2014 U.S. bilateral agreement with China that seeks to mitigate climate change, and its meaning for the COP21 agreement to be determined this December in Paris, France.

Location: Deutz Room in the Copley International Conference Center, Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Oct 20, 2015
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Aporia of Ethnicity and the State
Modern China, like other multi-ethnic nation-states, faces the aporia of the state and ethnicity. By treating the contestation between the state and ethnicity as a global cultural issue, the speakers intend to diachronically discuss the evolution of Chinese state’s policy on ethnic diversity.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Oct 19, 2015
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"Rodney Ludema: U.S. Implications of the TPP"
On the heels of the U.S., along with 11 other Pacific Rim countries, concluding negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), GPS is pleased to offer some insider perspective on the agreement from Rodney Ludema, chief economist at the U.S. Department of State. October 15, 2015 5-6:30pm No registration is required for this event.

Location: UC San Diego, GPS Robinson Auditorium
Event Date: Oct 15, 2015
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The Emergence of the PRI
Mexico's Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) was central to one of the longest-lived regimes of the twentieth century. Yet, the PRI’s emergence remains severely understudied in a body of work devoted mostly to explaining how the party maintained power once it was consolidated. In his research, Ackerman examines why the PRI formed as a mass party in some regions, but not others despite attempts to do so and similarity in conditions. In doing so, he tests prevailing approaches to the understanding of party formation that conceive mass parties as reflections of pre-constituted social sectors or as an after-effect of modernizing states.

Location: 10111 North Torrey Pines Road San Diego, CA 92093
Event Date: Oct 14, 2015
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2015 Day of the Girl Child
Our keynote speaker is Judge Najla Ayuoubi - who is a member of the 2015 cohort of Women PeaceMakers at the Joan Kroc Institute of Peace and Justice. Judge Najla Ayoubi of Afghanistan is a firm believer that there can be no peace without justice. She first took the bench in the late 80s in her native Parwan Province, before being forced out of her profession and public life during the rule of the Taliban. Unwilling to accept her fate, Ayoubi was soon organizing clandestine schools and sewing classes in bunkers, hidden from the Taliban’s religious police that forbade work for women or education for girls older than 8 years old. Raised in a family that prized education for both boys and girls, Ayoubi herself has two MA degrees: one in law and politics from the State University of Tajikistan and another on post-war recovery and development studies from the University of York in the United Kingdom.

Location: Great Hall- International House, UC San Diego
Event Date: Oct 10, 2015
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Japanese Business Strategies under Abenomics
"Abenomics” – a new policy regime under Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe – aims to revive the Japanese economy by addressing macroeconomic challenges and pushing Japanese companies to a new level of global competitiveness. Even as some observers remain critical, Japan has in fact introduced a large number of measures that change the incentives and pressures faced by Japanese CEOs. How have they responded? What is happening in the business strategy realm in Japan as of 2015, and what are the truly important developments that should not be overlooked?

Location: UC San Diego Campus, The Great Hall
Event Date: Oct 07, 2015
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China Town Hall: Chinese Investment in the United States
The 21st Century China Program is pleased to partner with the Global Education Initiative at The Bishop’s School to host the eighth annual CHINA Town Hall by the National Committee on United States-China Relations. CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming on China involving 70 cities throughout the United States.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Oct 05, 2015
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Catlonia, a new European State?
Come see the new documentary about the future of Catalonia, "l'Endema" (The Day After). The screening will be followed by a discussion and a FREE lunch.

Location: 6/8, 12:00pm, Hojel Auditorium, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego
Event Date: Jun 08, 2015
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Economic Impact of Mobile Technologies in China and India
Mobile technology has had an enormous impact on the global economy. The Boston Consulting Group and Qualcomm, Inc. have recently made an in-depth study at this impact, and during this event they will discuss their research, putting a spotlight on China and India as two case study markets.

Location: UC San Diego, Village West, Building 1, Meeting Rooms on Fifteen, Room A
Event Date: Jun 02, 2015
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Negotiating Denuclearization: Iran and North Korea
What are the prospects for achieving an international agreement on Iran’s nuclear program? Why did the Obama administration press forward on Iran but not on North Korea? What are the similarities and differences in the Iran and North Korea situations? How might an Iran agreement impact North Korea’s interest in a negotiated deal?

Location: Malamud Room, Insitute of the Americas, UC San Diego
Event Date: Jun 02, 2015
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China's Coming Water Crisis
One dilemma shared by both China and California is the increased scarcity of water owing to poor resource management and climate change. Dai Qing, one of China's most remarkable public intellectuals and a long-time activist on environmental issues, will explore how China's coming water crisis will affect its economic and political future.

Location: UC San Diego, Robinson Building Complex, Room 3201
Event Date: May 26, 2015
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Bordofarms: An Innovative Approach to Mexican Deportation
Speaker: Miguel Marshall, Kauffman Fellow as an Entrepreneur in Residence with Angel Ventures Mexico

Location: UC San Diego, Robinson Building Complex, Dean's conference room
Event Date: May 21, 2015
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China's Powerful Patriots: Nationalist Protest in China's Foreign Relations
How do public opinion and nationalist sentiment affect the foreign policy of China and other non-democratic states? Can authoritarian states like China utilize domestic politics to their advantage in international bargaining?

Location: Robinson Building Complex, Room 3201, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 20, 2015
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China's New Agenda: National Governance and Development
This special event will feature a dialogue between two of the most observant and experienced observers of Chinese politics, Susan Shirk and Lin Shangli. Their discussion will explore the new paradigm of Xi Jinping's governance model as well as the future of U.S.-China relations.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Roth Auditorium, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Dr San Diego, CA 92037
Event Date: May 19, 2015
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New Perspectives on Innovation and Intellectual Property Policy in China: What Does the Evidence Say?
China’s intellectual property regime is undergoing rapid change, although it is not always clear what this means for protection for foreign firms. This workshop, jointly organized by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and UC San Diego, brings together leading U.S. and Chinese IP, innovation, and economic experts from government, academia, and industry to explore the latest developments in the Chinese intellectual property domain and examine what the evidence means on issues ranging from Chinese patenting data to anti-trust enforcement activities and its implications for U.S. and Chinese businesses.

Location: San Diego Supercomputer Center Auditorium, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 19, 2015
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New Approaches for the Promotion of Innovation, Science and Technology: Bridging Japan and San Diego
UC San Diego's School of International Relations and Pacific Studies invites you to an evening of "Art and Science" on May 18 when we will launch our new "Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology" (JFIT) and The Fujiwara Fund, which will bring Japanese investments to San Diego's Internet of Things (IoT), biotech and wireless health industries

Location: Village Fifteen, Room A, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 19, 2015
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Japan and San Diego: An Evening of Art and Science
UC San Diego's School of International Relations and Pacific Studies invites you to an evening of "Art and Science" on May 18 when we will launch our new "Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology" (JFIT) and The Fujiwara Fund, which will bring Japanese investments to San Diego's Internet of Things (IoT), biotech and wireless health industries.

Location: The Great Hall, International House, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 18, 2015
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Bolivian Post-neoliberalism: An Alternative Development Model?
The Bolivian government represents a success story of a transformation from a social movement into a political party that captures the government. The government’s key agenda is defined as social justice and anti-neoliberalism, with communitarian socialism as the ultimate goal for Bolivian society. The New Economic, Social, Communitarian and Productive Model, behind Evo Morales’ government is the product of conflicting interests among the social groups supporting the government forces and the predominance of populists in power. I determine that Bolivia is at a stage of Andean-Amazonian capitalism. The result of the new development model, unfortunately, is the deepening of neo-extractivism, which is incapable of altering the existing economic structure inherited from the neoliberal era. The only significant difference in the new model is the stronger role of the state, and the lesson we draw from Bolivia’s experience is that extraction-based growth has a limited multiplier effect. Though the macroeconomic strength of the country is unprecedented, its economic path dependency is hindering further structural change in Bolivia.

Location: 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 14, 2015
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China's Economic Strategy in the Midst of the 'New Normal
Since the global financial crisis of 2008, economic growth rates in China have slowed such that many are wondering if the country will be able to maintain the stability is has achieved over the past two decades. The Chinese government is calling this new era of lowered growth rates the "New Normal," and to help us make sense of what this means, we are delighted to welcome one of China's most influential economists, Zhang Xiaojing.

Location: Social Sciences Building, Room 107, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 28, 2015
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Mexico in Crisis as Reflected through its Cinematic Lens
Speaker: David R. Maciel, professor emeritus, University of New Mexico and professor and division head, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Apr 20, 2015
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Book Discussion- The Revolution is for the Children: The Politics of Childhood in Havana and Miami, 1959-1962
The Revolution is for the Children examines how morally and emotionally charged understandings, practices and representations of childhood propelled the radicalization of the 1959 Cuban Revolution and the subsequent formation of the south Florida exile community. In it, Casavantes Bradford draws upon archival research conducted in both Havana and Miami to argue that Fidel Castro and senior revolutionary officials made deliberate use of children and images of childhood to steer an originally nationalist and reformist Revolution towards socialism and the USSR. At the same time, she argues that government interventions in the lives of children threatened Cuban middle class values and traditions, provoking deeply felt resistance to the new regime and sparking a massive exodus of former revolutionary supporters to southern Florida by 1961. By the conclusion of the 1962 October Missile Crisis, struggles to define, control and make symbolic use of Cuban childhood had become inextricably intertwined with the collective structures of feeling of the island and exilic Cuban communities. The Revolution is for the Children reveals for the first time the centrality of children to Cuban politics and national

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 17, 2015
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Valuing Dance: The Politics of Patronage in the Cuban Republic
In spite of longstanding economic straits, Cuba boasts a world renowned dance establishment that has played an important role within Cuban society and in Cuban international relations. This study explains why. It examines the development of Cuban dance from 1930 to 1990, particularly the connection between dance and politics over the decades and how this relationship changed over time. The seminar will begin with an overview of this larger project and then focus in on materials regarding the politics of dance patronage in the Cuban Republic. Starting in the 1930s and continuing through the 1950s, dancers, supporters, and government officials debated the social and cultural value of dance and the ideal scheme to financially support its growth. As the 1950s drew to a close, questions remained regarding these issues and uncertainties informed the improvised and contradictory approach to dance funding after 1959.

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 16, 2015
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Global Suburbs: Urban Sprawl from the Rio Grande to Rio de Janeiro
Speaker: Lawrence A. Herzog, professor, Graduate Program in City Planning, School of Public Affairs, San Diego State University

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Apr 15, 2015
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Civility, Victimhood and Citizenship in Post-dictatorship Chile
In the paper I explore civility in relation to victimhood and citizenship in post-dictatorial Chile. The analysis comes about as a dialogue between different sets of ethnographic material generated over the past 10 years, focusing on civil insecurity and crime protection among Santiago's lower and middle classes, and more recently on political action in intergenerational perspective. Juxtaposing these ethnographies I argue that since the return of democracy the hegemonic framework for civil society has been that of victimhood, and that a citizen-as-victim figure has been enforced in liaison with (global) discourses on post-conflict reconciliation combined with omnipresent attention to crime and civil security.

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 15, 2015
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Asian Economies in 2015: Prospect, Opportunities and Challenges
Wei Shang-Jin is the chief economist of the Asian Development Bank and a professor of finance and economics at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business. Prior to Columbia, Wei was an assistant director and chief of division at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), where he led the Fund’s policy research and advised on issues in international trade, investment and globalization. He was IMF chief of mission to Myanmar in 2004. Wei earned a Ph.D. in economics and a master’s degree in finance from UC Berkeley. He also holds a master’s degree in economics from Pennsylvania State University and a bachelor’s degree in world economy from Fudan University, China.

Location: UC San Diego, Malamud Conference Room at the Weaver Center
Event Date: Apr 14, 2015
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Compañeras: Zapatista Women’s Stories
Speaker: Hilary Klein, author and chief of staff at Make the Road New York.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Apr 08, 2015
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Nahuatl Across Borders (El Nahuatl Cruzando Fronteras)
Join us for a colloquium on the Nahuatl language and cultural revitalization in Mexico and the U.S., with participation from American and Mexican scholars, educators, activists and community organizers.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Gardner Room International Lane and Thurgood Marshall Lane La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Apr 04, 2015
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Visioning a Transit City: Transit Planning and Citizen Participation in Quito, Ecuador
Latin America is currently the most urbanized continent in the world after North America, with 80% of the population living in urban areas (UN 2014). As a result, Latin American cities are in pursuit of transformation on the one hand, through innovative transit solutions like, bus rapid transit, cable cars, and bicycles, and, on the other, urbanization marked by car-dependency. This seminar will begin by looking at two recent ideas that constitute these deep and contradictory changes to the urban landscape: deliberative democracy and sustainability in the context of Quito, Ecuador. Then, it will go on to discuss ongoing transit interventions in Quito, and in doing so, simultaneously question their current implications on public transport. This discussion will rely on accounts from public transit users in Quito to suggest an alternative approach to transit development amidst planning for a justice-oriented city.

Location: Deutz Room, Copley International Conference Room, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 02, 2015
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China's Military Development and the U.S.-Japan Alliance
As the world tries to make sense of China's rise - both militarily and economically - many questions remain about the country's regional strategy. This two-panel discussion with Japanese and United States experts will explore the development of China's regional military strategy, as well as what this means for the future of the U.S.-Japan joint alliance.

Location: UC San Diego, Malamud Conference Room at the Weaver Center
Event Date: Mar 24, 2015
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2015 Pacific Conference for Development Economics (PacDev)
The goal of PacDev is to bring together graduate students, faculty and practitioners to present and discuss various issues facing developing economies. The main session will be a panel discussion led by Paul Gertler, the Li Ka Shing Professor of Economics at UC Berkeley, where he holds appointments in the Haas School of Business and the School of Public Health. He is also the scientific director of the UC Center for Effective Global Action. The session is titled “Integrating the Adaptive Design Philosophy into Randomized Controlled Trials: Can We Combine Flexibility and Rigor in Studying Technology for Development?”

Location: Various campus locations including IR/PS, Institute of Americas and the Great Hall
Event Date: Mar 21, 2015
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Cultural Memory as Official Memory: Historical Narratives among Xavante Indians, Pioneers and Gauchos in Nova Xavantina, Brazil
In this seminar, I will analyze the symbolic struggles due to politics of migration in the town of Nova Xavantina, Brazil, in order to study the construction of cultural memory as official memory in the context of the occupation of the Brazilian Legal Amazon region. This town was created by the official colonization of politics and inhabited by indigenous populations before the expansion of the agricultural frontier in Brazil. The actors affected in this process are the Xavante Indians, known as angry warriors; the Pioneers, who came from northeastern Brazil through the March to the West political project; and lastly the Gauchos, who moved from southern Brazil during the Brazilian military dictatorship.

Location: Deutz Room, Copley International Conference Center, Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: Mar 05, 2015
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U.S.-China Economic Relationship The Third Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture
The third annual Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture will feature a discussion of United States-China relations with Robert D. Hormats, currently the vice chair of Kissinger Associates Inc. and former under secretary of state for Economic, Energy and Environmental Affairs. Mr. Hormats has worked extensively in Western Europe, China, India, Russia, the Middle East and South East Asia. His areas of expertise and experience include international trade and investment, intellectual property, foreign investment in the U.S., protection of trade secrets and global energy issues. In his lecture, he will be discussing China's foreign policy under Xi Jinping, as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by the U.S. as China's influence abroad continues to expand.

Location: The Great Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: Mar 02, 2015
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Oil and Regime Type in Venezuela: Reversing the Causal Arrow
In the 2000s, researchers became interested in the connection between oil and politics. Most of the propositions in the literature posit that oil dependence influences both the state and regime type. This talk proposes the reverse view. Venezuela under Chavismo (1999 to the present) shows how regime type affects the oil industry. That is, Venezuela's semi-authoritarian, populist regime has affected the type of petro-state that Venezuela has become and consequently the type of governance crisis that Venezuela is now confronting.

Location: Deutz Room, Copley International Conference Center, Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: Feb 26, 2015
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China's Incursion into Latin America: Myths and Realities
Speaker: Jorge Guajardo, former Mexican ambassador to China EmPac Pacific Leadership Fellow Jorge Guajardo will talk about the myths and realities of a new Chinese presence in Latin America, illustrating what is real and what is a misconceived perception in the West.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall International House, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Feb 19, 2015
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Spirituality that is good: Research, public policy, and clinical practice for the promotion of spirituality as a dimension of human health.
In this seminar I will analyze the production of spirituality as a dimension of human health within the medical sciences, public health policies, and clinical practice. I will discuss the interest of medical science in spirituality, or in some of the ways in which spirituality has been recognized by researchers and practitioners who respond to an agenda of research and concern with maintaining human health. For this, I will show the intensified use of the concept of spirituality in medical sciences since the 1970s. Subsequently, I will explore how the terms spirituality and holism have been used as principles of justification for a National Policy on Integrative and Complementary Practices, which provides the incorporation of alternative therapies into Brazil’s public health system.

Location: Cramb Library in the Gildred/LAS Building, Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: Feb 19, 2015
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The Internet with Chinese Characteristics
With more than 648 million Chinese now regularly going online, the growth of the Internet in China is one of the most remarkable stories of the past decade, with the development of the mobile web fueling an explosion of online entrepreneurship. Pacific Leadership Fellow James Ding’s talk will explore how the Internet developed in China, and how it will further disrupt all sectors of the economy and continue to foster entrepreneurship.

Location: Meeting Rooms on Fifteen, Village West Building 1 (15th floor), UC San Diego
Event Date: Feb 11, 2015
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The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race
Mass migration from Latin America and Asia is dramatically changing the racial landscape of our nation. In California, Latinos and Asians already collectively constitute the majority in large metropolitan areas, a demographic shift that is reshaping the way children of immigrants are racially incorporated into American society. To date, race scholars treat Latinos and Asians as two distinct pan-ethnic categories. In this presentation, Professor Ocampo examines how Filipino Americans, the largest Asian group in the state, disrupt this conventional divide and negotiate their racial identity within an emerging Latino-Asian racial spectrum. Drawing on interviews and survey data of Filipino Americans in Southern California, he demonstrates how multi-ethnic contexts interact with historical factors to influence Filipino racial formation. Professor Ocampo argues that the cultural residuals of Spanish and U.S. colonialism affect how Filipinos racially position themselves vis-à-vis Latinos and Asians, the two fastest growing pan-ethnic groups in the country. These findings have implications for better understanding how the racialization process is evolving as the United States moves beyond a black-white racial paradigm.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building, Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Feb 09, 2015
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How Innovation Works in California and Shanghai
Panelists: Jin Li, Fudan University vice president; David Michael, Boston Consulting Group senior partner & managing director San Francisco; and Jim Wunderman, Bay Area Council president and CEO Moderator: Peter Cowhey, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies dean

Location: Institute of the Americas, Hojel Auditorium, UC San Diego
Event Date: Feb 05, 2015
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Chicanas & the 1970 Moratorium
Hear from Chicana and Chicano leaders who were instrumental in the Chicano Moratorium. Organized by Chicano/a Latino/a Arts & Humanities.

Location: UC San Diego Malamud Conference Room at the Weaver Center, 10111 North Torrey Pines Road
Event Date: Feb 03, 2015
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Metaphysical Odyssey Into the Mexican Revolution
In a blend of personal essay and deeply researched metaphysical and Mexican history that reads like a novel, award-winning writer and noted literary translator C.M. Mayo provides a rich introduction and the first English translation of “Spiritist Manual,” the secret book by Francisco I. Madero. Madero was the leader of Mexico's 1910 Revolution and president of Mexico from 1911 - 1913.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Dean's Conference Room
Event Date: Jan 29, 2015
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The success and failure of indigenous organizations to influence land and natural resources policies and their implementation in the Andes
Indigenous peoples’ organizations have surged as international actors ever since the 1990s, establishing ties with a broad network of actors on the local, national, and transnational levels. Their efforts to influence policies on those distinct levels have been manifold and targeted on different policy subareas with the idea to create policies sensitive to their demands. While some advocacy efforts have been particular fruitful resulting in the adoption of international legal norms and the recognition of ethnic diversity, studies point towards an implementation gap of those rights on the local and national levels. Differences among indigenous and peasant organizations have also become more pronounced showing varying levels of influence. The seminar will explore how some of these organizations are more successful than others to introduce their demands with regard to land and natural resource projects in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. Possible explanations will be discussed as well as the shortcomings of dominant theoretical approaches.

Location: Deutz Room, Copley International Conference Center, Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: Jan 29, 2015
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Democracy and Cultural Expression: Confronting Modernization in the Philippines
Alternately hailed as a beacon of democracy in Southeast Asia and yet also seen as a place of corruption and human rights abuses, the Philippines continues to be an often-baffling cradle of contradictions. This modernizing society seems ever on the verge of great political and economic transformation, but almost just as inevitably keeps getting held back by age-old realities and complexities. EmPac Pacific Leadership Fellow Jose Dalisay explores how culture mediates this divide and offers reflection, relief and hope to the otherwise disempowered.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Roth Auditorium
Event Date: Jan 28, 2015
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Hukou Reform and Rural Dispossession in China
Since the 1950s, the Chinese government has allocated resources through a household registration system, called “hukou,” dividing the population into urban and rural residents with different — and very unequal — sets of entitlements. For decades urban residents were guaranteed employment and an array of social services, while rural residents were guaranteed access to land, but little else. In recent decades hukou reforms, together with other market reforms, broke down exclusionary mechanisms that underpin the old system. Early hukou reforms opened urban labor markets, giving rural migrants access to city jobs, while more recent reforms have opened rural land markets. These recent reforms facilitated land concentration and provided access to real estate developers and agribusiness companies, in line with the government’s current agenda of promoting rapid urbanization and large-scale agriculture. Because most scholarship on hukou reform has focused on urban entitlements, it has missed this fundamental shift, which has turned the reform into a weapon of rural dispossession. In his talk, professor Joel Andreas will reexamine the evolution of the hukou system, focusing on access to rural land and considering the implications for the rural population of the current shift from hukou-based to market-based land rights.

Location: UC San Diego, Robinson Building Complex, Room 3201
Event Date: Jan 20, 2015
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Citizenship, Security & Human Rights in Mexico and Central America
Mexico and Central America are facing an unprecedented wave of violence, making everyday life increasingly more precarious and insecure. In this two-day conference, we examine the consequences of insecurity, as well as citizen and policymaker reaction to violence.

Location: UC San Diego Malamud Conference Room at the Weaver Center, 10111 North Torrey Pines Road
Event Date: Jan 15, 2015
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The Rule of Law in China: Prospects & Challenges
The resolution that emerged from last October's Fourth Plenary session of the 18th Communist Party of China Central Committee promised aggressive and far-reaching legal reforms. But are these realistic? In this panel discussion, experts on China's legal system will discuss the challenges to the rule of law in China.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Weaver Center
Event Date: Jan 14, 2015
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Fourth Annual Herb York Memorial Lecture featuring Dr. Irwin Jacobs
Dr. Jacobs will speak on “The Relationship Between Research Universities, Industry, and Innovation.” He will provide insights on his success in turning Qualcomm into one of the global leaders of the information technology age and the enabling factors, especially the role of UC San Diego, which led to this success. The annual event is generously sponsored by the York familyand honors Dr. Herbert York. A distinguished nuclear physicist and Manhattan Project participant, Dr. York was the founding chancellor of UC San Diego, first director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, founder of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, as well as the founding director of IGCC.

Location: JR Beyster Auditorium, Rady School of Management, UC San Diego
Event Date: Dec 16, 2014
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Inside Cuba Policy Trip
The Institute will lead a discovery program in Havana and surrounding areas from December 7th to 14th, 2014. The trip is a week of immersion in Cuban governance, business, society, art and culture as legally licensed educational travelers. Participants will meet with high-ranking government officials, chat with entrepreneurs in the emerging Cuban private sector, enjoy the work of professional artists and musicians, hear from renowned historians and convene with diplomats and economists familiar with the intricacies of the island. Few in our generation have been inside Cuba, and even fewer have had the inside access being offered to you by the Institute. The Institute offers an insider’s perspective to a host of topics, including social issues, economic realities, prospects for the island’s future, the unique US-Cuba relationship and everyday life in Cuba. Don’t miss this opportunity to study Cuban policy through the lens of the people and places that make it so intriguing.

Location:
Event Date: Dec 07, 2014
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Reflections of a Foreign Correspondent with National Book Award winner Evan Osnos
Foreign correspondent Evan Osnos is widely considered one of the most incisive and productive journalists of his generation. In this public lecture, he will discuss his 2014 National Book Award winner “Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China” — based on eight years of living in Beijing — as well as his reflections on the pitfalls and challenges of being a foreign correspondent.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall International House, La Jolla, CA 92093
Event Date: Dec 04, 2014
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Diabetes and the Latino Community
Diabetes is a daunting public health issue in the U.S.: more than 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with the disease and another 79 million are estimated to have pre-diabetes. The problem is particularly worrisome in the Latino community, where disease rates are nearly double those of non-Hispanic whites. San Diego, with its large Hispanic population as well as its proximity to the border, experiences this issue in unique ways. Public health agencies and local organizations have developed innovative approaches to address the community’s needs. Please join us for a breakfast conversation with health care practitioners on the forefront of diabetes care as we discuss care delivery in the local Hispanic and cross-border community. We’ll look at successful programs, models of care, technologies and educational outreach to culturally diverse populations in our area. Our panelists join us from the Family Health Centers of San Diego and the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute .

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: Dec 03, 2014
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Over Here: WWI and the "American Century"
Speaker: Professor Rebecca Plant of UCSD's History department will discuss the "American Centry" in the final talk of the lecture series "World War 1 and the Birth of the Modern World." Rebecca Jo Plant is an associate professor of history. Her research interests focus on women’s, gender and family history; the history of therapeutic culture and the psychological professions; and the social and psychological impact of war in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. She received her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University and has taught at UC San Diego since 2002.

Location: Great Hall of the International House, Eleanor Roosevelt College, UC San Diego
Event Date: Dec 02, 2014
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Registering the Violence of Law: Judicial Irony in Gujarat since 2002
Justice is scalar, and in multiple ways. While legal cases might be tracked through the lower to upper courts, legal action also inhabits what geographers call scale-jumping: the efforts of local actors to move a set of events out of the domestic and into a larger domain of debate or adjudication. What happens when the terrain of rights shifts from the local to the national, regional, or international? What ironies emerge between the struggle for justice at the local level and the articulation of rights violations at the national or international level? Kamala Visweswaran, Associate Professor at the Department of Anthropology at UT Austin, will address some of the issues that followed from pursuing the Gujarat violence cases of 2002 in the national arena in contrast to local strategies of documentation.

Location: The School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, Robinson Building Complex, Suite 4200
Event Date: Nov 20, 2014
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Investigative Journalism at Institute of the Americas
This five-day professional workshop will offer training sessions on investigating financial/white-collar crime stories, organized crime, high-profile political figures and environmental abuses, as well as in-depth reporting on breaking, competitive stories. The instructors will be working journalists whose presentations focus on ways to access sensitive information, on interview techniques and presenting investigative data that is both informative and compelling. The workshop will include journalism exercises that are designed as interactive sessions between the participants and the speakers.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Nov 10, 2014
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Defining Mexico’s Role in the Global Economy
Twenty years after the signing of NAFTA, Mexico is now Latin America’s second largest economy. However, economic growth in Mexico remains sluggish and there is continued debate on the extent to which the agreement has helped the country integrate into the global economy. Will President Pena Nieto’s ambitious package of reforms in energy, telecommunications, security and education put Mexico on the path to prosperity? Will these reforms increase Mexico’s stature in the global marketplace? EmPac Director Gordon Hanson joins Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan in a lively discussion to help answer these questions and more. A reception will be held after the talk

Location: The Global Forum at the International House, UC San Diego
Event Date: Nov 05, 2014
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Firms and the Economics of Skilled Immigration w/ William Kerr and discussant Gordon Hanson
Firms play a central role in the selection, sponsorship, and employment of skilled immigrants entering the United States for work through programs like the H-1B visa. This chapter discusses the evidence that has been assembled to date in understanding the impact of high skilled immigration from the perspective of the firm and the open areas that call for more research.

Location: UC San Diego, Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building, Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Oct 20, 2014
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Asylum in the United States: A Tour of Latin America and the Continent’s Claims
Yvette Lopez-Cooper is an immigration attorney in San Diego, California and has dedicated her career to representing immigrants from all over the world. Her deportation defense practice focuses on applications for asylum, lawful permanent residents, cancellation of removal for nonresidents, and naturalization cases.

Location: UC San Diego, Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building, Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Oct 16, 2014
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Sports Medicine at the Winter Olympics with Dr. Gloria Beim
Did you know that a UC San Diego School of Medicine alumna was at the forefront of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia? Dr. Gloria Beim, SOM ’90, was chosen to be chief medical officer for Team USA at this year’s games. Since graduating from the UC San Diego School of Medicine Dr. Beim has also served as team physician for the U.S. Cycling Team during two previous Olympic games, acted as chief medical officer at the World University Games in 2005 and the Pan Am Games in 2011, and founded her own practice located on the western slope of the Colorado Rockies where she is as an accomplished orthopedic surgeon specializing in shoulder surgery, knee surgery, arthroscopy, and sports medicine Please join Dr. Beim for a thrilling presentation on sports medicine and her experience as chief medical officer at the Olympic Games. Dr. Beim has appeared on The Today Show and is an accomplished author with nearly fifteen published books and articles to her credit.

Location: Medical Education and Telemedicine Building
Event Date: Sep 19, 2014
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Seeking Asylum in North America with Judge Rico Bartolomei
Thursday, September 18 at 12:10pm 350 Cedar Street Building, California Western School of Law Judge Rico Bartolomei, the third highest ranking judge in the U.S. Immigration Court, will be the lead off speaker for the twelve annual joint speakers series, co-sponsored by California Western School of Law’s International Legal Studies Program and the Institute of International, Comparative and Area Studies at UC San Diego. The speakers series title is Seeking Asylum in North America.

Location: 350 Cedar Street Building, California Western School of Law
Event Date: Sep 18, 2014
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Implications of Deportation on Health & Well Being
The United States has expelled nearly 2 million persons since 2009. Relatively little research exists on the potential ramifications of this unprecedented event on health and well being. This talk will highlight notable findings relating to understanding deportation in the context of the northern US-Mexico border and southern Mexico-Guatemala border regions. Research is being conducted by three leading researchers in the field of migration and health and it features the potential health vulnerabilities that deported migrants may experience in the context of converging social forces including drug trafficking, sex tourism and poverty. Victoria Ojeda is an Associate Professor in the Division of Global Public Health in the Department of Medicine at UCSD. She conducts qualitative and quantitative research on substance use, HIV/AIDS, and mental health issues, with a focus on Latino deportees, and injection drug users. Kimberly Brouwer is an Associate Professor in the Division of Global Public Health in the Department of Medicine at UCSD. She researches the spatial and molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases, studying the dynamic between the host and environment, and how this relates to susceptibility to and spread of infections. Shira Goldenberg is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Gender and Sexual Health Initiative of the Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and the Division of AIDS in the Department of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. She conducts qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research on social and structural factors shaping HIV/STI risk among mobile, vulnerable populations in Canada and Latin America.

Location: Biomedical Research Facility, School of Medicine Conference Room 5A03
Event Date: Sep 10, 2014
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IDEAS Performance: Epic of Gilgamesh - A Tale of Love and Revenge
This talk and screening by UCSD MFA-Visual Arts candidate Elmira Mohebali is the seventh in the 2014 IDEAS performance series. The Epic of Gilgamesh is a long-term video project based on extensive and continuous research of the original mythology, believed to be the oldest literary text discovered in human history, dating to the first Ancient Mesopotamian civilization. There are several ongoing paintings, photographs, and short videos being made based on the research as well as personal and professional interviews. In her art practice, Elmira Mohebali considers raising questions to be a crucial aspect. In her work, she does not necessarily propose solutions or answers, but she finds these worth addressing. Each of her videos highlights a certain questionable approach toward gender and sexuality within our society. In A Tale of Love and Revenge, Mohebali examines many issues that repeated through the years since ancient times. The orientalist exoticization of the eastern female body in the postcolonial era, binary gender constructions and power struggles between these constructed genders are a few of the issues addressed in this work.

Location: Calit2 Theater, Atkinson Hall
Event Date: Aug 21, 2014
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WEBINAR: Mexico’s New Energy Regulatory Landscape and the Role of CRE
Mexico’s energy reform process continues to dominate the headlines. The constitutional amendments and secondary legislation aim to overhaul every aspect of Mexico’s energy value chain, with widespread implications beyond the nation’s energy sector accompanied by the promise of economic growth and prosperity for the nation. We are delighted to be joined by Francisco Xavier Salazar, President of Mexico’s Energy Regulatory Commission (CRE), for a webinar discussion on the role of CRE in shaping Mexico’s energy future and the impact of the energy reform process on the country’s regulatory framework. Salazar will analyze what the profound reforms mean for the nation’s energy sector but specifically the expanded role set forth for CRE. Salazar will also discuss the impact of the reforms on energy transportation, infrastructure, and the electric sector. Salazar’s presentation will be followed by an interactive question and answer session with the audience, moderated by the Institute of the Americas. If you are unable to attend but are interested in the discussion, please register anyway and we will send you a copy of the recording.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Aug 20, 2014
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Executive Roundtable: Mexico's Economic Outlook
While Mexico receives continual accolades in the international press for strides made in the national reform agenda and for the growth of its manufacturing sector, many analysts have misgivings about the nation’s outlook. Do the optimistic headlines belie a more troubled reality? What lies behind the veneer of the “rising star”? We are honored to host Luis Maizel for a frank assessment of the country’s economic performance, business environment and investment landscape. Maizel, an investment strategist born and raised in Mexico City, has been named one of the 100 most influential Latinos in the United States. He is co-founder of LM Capital Group, which manages over $5 billion in assets. His experience includes serving as Vice President of Finance for Grupoventas, S.A.; faculty member at the Harvard Business School; and President of Industrial Kuick, S.A.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Aug 19, 2014
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IR/PS Open House
Learn how our unique and challenging programs can help you pursue your passion in international affairs and advance your career. The August Open House includes an information session with representatives from IR/PS career services, student affairs and admissions. Immediately following the Open House attendees are invited to join current students, alumni, staff and faculty at our annual social event celebrating IR/PS. You can find out more about this event here: IR/PS Summer Celebrations - San Diego. All Open House attendees will be automatically registered for Summer Celebrations.

Location: IR/PS Complex
Event Date: Aug 14, 2014
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WEBINAR: SHALE IN MEXICO – SEPARATING FACT FROM FICTION
Join us on July 23 at 11am San Diego time for a virtual panel as we seek to separate fact from fiction in the Mexico shale debate. In May, The Economist ran a headline that said Mexico’s shale outlook is on shaky ground. Since that article, Forbes, Bloomberg and Reuters ran stories similarly dashing the outlook for development of shale in Mexico. Forbes asked whether Mexico's water scarcity would render self-defeat. Bloomberg reported from the shale frontlines and asserted that the security issues that have plagued northern Mexico are real threats to shale prospects. Reuters looked at the “big potential, many obstacles” for shale in Mexico. We are delighted to be joined by Carlos Garcia, International Business Development Manager at Lewis Energy and Montserrat Ramiro of Centro Mario Molina in Mexico. Other panelists will be confirmed shortly. Panelists’ remarks will be followed by a question and answer session. If you’re interested but unable to attend, please register anyway and we will send you the link.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Jul 23, 2014
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Tequila Talk: Transparency in the Mexican Educational System
Mexico spends more per student than most industrialized nations and yet exhibits the lowest levels of academic achievement, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (2013). To discuss the causes of this gap, we are honored to host Alexandra Zapata for a discussion on transparency and accountability in the Mexican educational system. Zapata, coordinator of the Mejora Tu Escuela initiative at the Mexican think tank IMCO, led a widely-circulated report published in May that uncovered extreme payroll irregularities, such as teachers 105 years of age, “phantom schools” and teachers earning more than the president of Mexico. She will address the political response to the data compiled in this staggering report, as well as efforts to improve transparency in the educational system, particularly in the context of national educational reform. She will also cover how open data initiatives such as this one can lead to greater accountability in Mexico. Mejora Tu Escuela has been lauded as one of the two most advanced projects of open data in the country.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Jul 23, 2014
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Campamento de Verano en Ciencia e Innovacion
The Institute of the Americas Science and Innovation Summer Camp for Latin American high school students (14-18 years old) will be held July 2014 on the University of California, San Diego campus. The fifth annual Science and Innovation Summer Camp will host up to 40 high school students from countries throughout Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada, and the U.S. who will be selected based on their desire to conduct scientific research on the environment and climate change once they graduate from college. During the two-week residential camp at the Institute of the Americas, students will receive classroom and field instruction from accredited Spanish-speaking community college teachers, with projects designed to help them understand the controversies and test scientific principles in the lab. The camp will also focus on innovation as students create and evaluate scientific and technological responses to climate change. Students will conduct experiments on ocean science, climate change and energy conservation. They will test water samples – which they will bring from their own countries – for arsenic and coliform bacteria. They will build solar cars and investigate advanced informatics. And they will focus on how science can serve society, especially through innovation in Latin America in the areas of environment, climate change and alternative energy. Tuition is $4,400 and includes 13 nights’ lodging in La Jolla, three meals a day, local transportation (including airport pickup and drop off), field trips, social events and medical insurance.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Jul 14, 2014
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WEBINAR: NATURAL GAS IN PERU – CAMISEA AND BEYOND
Peru’s energy matrix has changed markedly in the decade since the Camisea natural gas project began production. Camisea now provides all natural gas consumed in Lima and accounts for 50 percent of power generation across the country. The Humala administration has plans to further expand the role for natural gas in Peru and the requisite infrastructure. But as domestic demand rises, Peru’s energy producers may need to look beyond Camisea to ensure supplies and maintain growth in one of Latin America’s best performing economies. Join us for a webinar discussion with Emilio Weber, New Business Development Manager at Pluspetrol Resources Corporation. Weber will reflect on the significance of the natural gas project for Peru, and comment on the outlook for Camisea as well as the role of natural gas in Peru’s energy matrix. Weber’s presentation will be followed by an interactive question and answer session with the audience. If you are interested but unable to attend the live event, please register anyway and we will send you the recording.

Location: https://www.iamericas.org/en/events/events-registration?task=individual_registration&event_id=60
Event Date: Jul 08, 2014
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CHILE ENERGY ROUNDTABLE
The topic of energy figured prominently in Chile’s election last year. Chile currently imports 97 percent of its fossil fuels and depends on hydropower for 42 percent of its electricity generation. Given her previous term, Ms. Bachelet arrived at La Moneda fairly well-versed in the issues surrounding the country’s energy woes. But with the country’s economic growth in recent years, the need to address the problem has become ever more urgent. Indeed, according to the Chilean Electric Power Association, power consumption in Chile will double by 2025. During the campaign, Ms. Bachelet indicated that in her first 100 days the Energy Ministry will be tasked with establishing an “energy agenda” and during the course of 2014 developing a National Energy Policy. This forum is set to coincide with the Bachelet government’s announcement of its “energy agenda.” Panels will assess the concrete steps for action being proposed, the need to move past diagnosis, finding areas for dialogue between the government, NGO’s and private sector, incentivizing competition in the electric generation market, and where sources such as natural gas/LNG, coal, and renewables fit for Chile’s energy matrix.

Location: Hotel Intercontinental Las Condes
Event Date: Jun 24, 2014
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Documentary and Memory
Beijing-based filmmaker Wu Wenguang (???), one of China’s best-known and most-accomplished independent documentary filmmakers, joins us for a special public talk and film screening of “I Want to Be a People’s Representative” (???????). Wu is an active promoter of the unofficial visual documentation of memory and reality movement in contemporary China. His recent work includes experimental dance and theater, which is integral to his multi-year Memory Project that documents Chinese villagers’ recollections of the famine that claimed over 30 million lives in 1958-60. In 2013’s "I Want to Be a People’s Representative,” filmmaker Jia Zhitan (???) uses his camera to confront local government authorities in China's Hunan Province, ignoring their insistence for off-camera interviews. The result is an intriguing tale of occasional power reversal where the ruler is afraid of the ruled… in front of the camera. A reception featuring Wu will be held before the lecture and film screening.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Auditorium
Event Date: Jun 17, 2014
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TEQUILA TALK WITH AGUASCALIENTES GOVERNOR CARLOS LOZANO DE LA TORRE
Long known for its agriculture and natural landscapes, the state of Aguascalientes is becoming increasingly lauded for its high-tech manufacturing sectors and automotive cluster. In 2013, Nissan invested USD $2 billion on a new plant in Aguascalientes and CEO Carlos Ghosn declared that the plant will produce 1 million cars in Mexico by 2016, a feat that will cement Aguascalientes’ role as export hub for Nissan to the Americas. Bolstered by growth in the automotive sector and as a result of a diversified economy, the state has proven itself to be among the most resilient regions of the country, boasting economic growth rates of 3.0% over the last 5 years compared to the rest of Mexico’s GDP growth of 1.9%. Analysts have predicted that Aguascalientes will continue to figure strongly in Mexican economic growth in upcoming years.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Jun 10, 2014
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MEXICO’S MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT JUAN JOSE GUERRA ABUD TALKS ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE IMPACT ON THE AMERICAS
Mexico is taking a leading role in confronting the impacts of climate change. Last year, the Mexican government established a National Climate Change Strategy that sets achievable goals over the next 40 years to develop clean energies, generate jobs in clean energy, promote sustainable development and improve public health and the quality of life. This strategy focuses mainly on cross-sectoral climate policy and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Jun 09, 2014
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We are Adivasis: Aspiration in an Indian Scheduled Tribe
Megan Moodie is an Anthropology Professor at University of California, Santa Cruz. Her interests include South Asian studies, feminist theory, reproductive and population politics, kinship, development, legal identities, and tribal communities.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Jun 05, 2014
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Fragile Landscapes of Contemporary Yucatan: Time-share resorts, Pink Flamingos, Colonial Tastes and Pulverized Maquilas
Matilde Cordoba Azcarate's recent research explores tourism as a neoliberal project, space production and community development in Southern Mexico where she is currently exploring the production of spatially and politically diverse landscapes of consumption and hybrid governance structures from the perspective of those who cater for tourism.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Jun 05, 2014
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Immigration Policy: A Transatlantic Comparison
Martin A. Schain is Professor of Politics at New York University. Among other books, he is the author of The Politics of Immigration in France, Britain and the United States: A Comparative Study (Palgrave, 2008), French Communism and Local Power (St. Martin's, 1985), and co-author of Politics in France (Harper-Collins, 1992). He is co-editor and author of Comparative Federalism: The US and EU in Comparative Perspective (Oxford, 2006) and Shadows Over Europe: The Development and Impact of the Extreme Right in Europe (Palgrave, 2002). Professor Schain is the founder and former director of the Center for European Studies at NYU and former chair of the European Union Studies Association. He is co-editor of the transatlantic scholarly journal, Comparative European Politics.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Jun 04, 2014
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Does California have a fracking future?
Shale oil and gas production is changing the US energy landscape. But how states have managed policies dealing with hydraulic fracturing or fracking is far from uniform. North Dakota and Pennsylvania have embraced it while in New York a moratorium on fracking has restricted shale production. California has arrived at a similar crossroads. The state sits atop some of the country’s largest shale reserves – in the Monterey formation. There are strong arguments in favor of the possible economic benefits of shale production but also valid environmental and community concerns.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Malamud Room
Event Date: Jun 04, 2014
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‘Assignment China: Tiananmen Square’ A documentary screening and discussion
Twenty-five years ago, a large-scale, mass protest erupted at the center of China’s political symbolism, Tiananmen Square in Beijing. The protest lasted for nearly two months and spread to over 100 cities across the country. Millions of people from all walks of society took part, before the government brought in the People’s Liberation Army to suppress it June 3-4. The protest and its bloody crackdown became a defining moment, not just in contemporary China, but also in world-media history. It was the first time in decades when a sizable group of foreign journalists were in Beijing, most to cover the first Sino-Soviet summit in 30 years. Several quickly refocused their attention on the protests, with some broadcasting live from the square. Their work that spring affected foreign perception and state policies towards China’s government in many countries around the world. Assignment China is a documentary series produced by University of Southern California’s US-China Institute (USCI), examining American news coverage of China since 1945, as well as the function and contribution of media and journalism in the two countries’ unfolding relationship. This episode focuses on coverage of the 1989 demonstrations and their suppression. USCI senior fellow Mike Chinoy, then CNN Beijing bureau chief, wrote and narrates the episode.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 3201
Event Date: Jun 03, 2014
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Virtual Experience, Collective Memory and the Constitution of Public Space Through the Mass Media: The Example of Ex-Yugoslavia
Jeffrey Barash has published extensively on the problem of historical meaning in relation to memory, myth, personal experience, and political identity in studies of Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Hannah Arendt, and Ernst Cassirer. His talk will discuss his work on collective memory, the mass media and ex-Yugoslavia.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Jun 02, 2014
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Horizons of Global Health First Annual UCSD Global Health Student Research Symposium
Join us to celebrate the launch of UCSD'S NEW BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GLOBAL HEALTH (BAGH)! Global Health is a dynamic new field aimed at understanding the many processes of illness and healing across the globe and achieving equity in health for people worldwide. It is a synthesis of population-based prevention, individual-level clinical care, and cross-cultural understanding of variations and commonalities in the experiences of illness, the process of becoming and staying well, and the practices of healing.

Location: Great Hall ERC
Event Date: May 30, 2014
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How did China Borrow So Much, So Fast? Sources of Financial Weakness
Carl Walter worked in China and its financial sector for over 20 years and actively participated in many of the country’s financial-reform efforts. While at Credit Suisse First Boston, he played a major role in China’s groundbreaking first overseas IPO in 1992. Later at Morgan Stanley, he was a member of senior management at China International Capital Corporation, China’s first and most successful investment bank. While there, he supported a number of groundbreaking domestic and international stock and bond under writings for major Chinese corporations. More recently, at JPMorgan he was China chief operating officer and CEO of its China banking subsidiary. During this time, Walter helped build a pioneering domestic security, risk and currency trading-operation. A previous long-time resident of Beijing, Walter is fluent in Mandarin and holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a graduate certificate from Peking University. He is the co-author of “Red Capitalism: The Fragile Financial Foundation of China’s Extraordinary Rise,” which has been published in Chinese in China. His earlier book “Privatizing China: Inside China’s Stock Markets” was also published in China and, like “Red Capitalism,” contributed to the government’s policy debate.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 3201
Event Date: May 29, 2014
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What can International Relations Learn from International Law?
The emerging field of international law and international relations (IL/IR) is nominally interdisciplinary, but the intellectual terms of trade have been one-sided, consisting largely of the application of IR as a discipline to IL as a subject. IR scholars generally view IL scholarship as naïvely formalist and methodologically suspect, and have largely ignored it. Ironically, in doing so IR scholars often embrace a type of unwitting formalism that narrowly equates international law with the black-letter rules of treaties, interpretation with the rulings of international courts, and impact with formal compliance with ratified treaties. This paper attempts to “reverse field,” exploring what IR scholars can learn from IL scholarship. We offer a brief primer on leading IL theories, demonstrating that the image of IL scholarship as formalistic and blind to political realities is obsolete. We then identify how international legal writings can advance IR thinking with respect to law-making (more fine-grained theories of design, greater attention to customary law), interpretation (examining interpretive strategies, as well as interpretation outside of courts), and application (a focus on the uses of indeterminate laws by political actors, and the impact of law “beyond compliance”).

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: May 29, 2014
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Territorial and Cultural Inclusion: Comparing Citizenship Policies in Europe
Rainer Bauböck holds a chair in social and political theory at the Department of Political and Social Sciences of the European University Institute. He is on leave from the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna. From 1986 to 1999 Rainer Bauböck was a researcher and associate professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna. He has taught regularly at the Universities of Vienna and Innsbruck and was a recurrent visiting professor at Central European University Budapest. He was also a visiting researcher/guest professor at the Bellagio Rockefeller Foundation (June-July 2006), at Yale University (Jan-May 2005), the University Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona (2003), the University of Bristol (April-June 2002), University of Malmö (September 2000-February 2001); the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton and Princeton University (September 1998-June 1999); and the University of Warwick (1990-91). In 2003-2005, Rainer Bauböck was President of the Austrian Association of Political Science. In November 2006, he was awarded the Latsis Prize of the European Science Foundation for his work on immigration and social cohesion in modern societies. In April 2013 Rainer Bauböck was elected corresponding member abroad of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. In October 2013 he was awarded a doctor honoris causa by Malmö University, Sweden. From October 2012 Rainer Bauböck is Dean of Graduate Studies at the European University Institute

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: May 28, 2014
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Structural Reforms and Long-Term Economic Growth in Mexico
Speaker: Alejandro Diaz-Bautista, professor of International Economics, researcher and economic consultant

Location: Institute of the Americas CILAS library
Event Date: May 28, 2014
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A tale of two Mexicos: Growth and prosperity in a two-speed economy
In the 20 years since the North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect, Mexico has become a global manufacturing leader and a prime destination for investors and multinationals around the world. Yet the country’s economic growth continues to disappoint, and the rise in living standards has stalled. The root cause is a chronic productivity problem that stems from the economy’s two-speed nature. A modern, fast-growing Mexico, with globally competitive multinationals and cutting-edge manufacturing plants, exists amid a far larger group of traditional Mexican enterprises that do not contribute to growth. These two Mexicos are moving in opposite directions. Read more about the report. Jaana Remes is a partner at the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), McKinsey & Company’s business and economics research arm. Since 2003, Dr. Remes has led MGI's research on productivity, urbanization, competitiveness and growth. Her most recent research looks at the cities and the shifting global company landscape, the rising urban consuming class and shifting economic power of cities, as well as the patterns of urban growth and renewal across the Americas. Other recent work sheds light on the changing global manufacturing landscape through case studies of diverse industries and draws implications for companies and policy makers. Her previous research includes an in-depth analysis of how different policies have contributed to industry competitiveness and growth, the impact of multinational companies on emerging economies, and in-depth assessments of the barriers to competitiveness and growth across a range of economies, including the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Finland, Sweden, Brazil and South Korea.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 3202
Event Date: May 28, 2014
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Rethinking Sovereignty at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919
Leonard V. Smith is the author of: The Embattled Self: French Soldiers' Testimony of the Great War (Cornell University Press, 2007); France and the Great War, 1914-1918 (with Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau and Annette Becker, Cambridge University Press, 2003); and Between Mutiny and Obedience: The Case of the French Fifth Infantry Division During World War I (Princeton University Press, 1994).He is also working on an extended review essay on the historiography of France and World War I in honor of the 2014 centennial for the Journal of Modern History. In 2013-14, he will teach an upper-level course on international relations theory for historians, the Modern Europe survey, and will direct the Senior Projects course.

Location: Ruiz Room, Humanities & Social Sciences Building (H&SS), Room 5086
Event Date: May 27, 2014
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Tax reforms and political interests in the early nineteenth century and twenty-first century in Colombia, Chile and Mexico.
The seminar will be presented by Visiting Scholar, Pedro Pérez-Herrero.

Location: Deutz room, Copley Building, at the Institute of the Americas
Event Date: May 27, 2014
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2014 CUBA EDUCATIONAL AND POLICY TRIP
From May 24th to 31st, 2014, the Institute will convene a delegation to explore policy in Havana and surrounding areas. The trip is a week of immersion in Cuban government, business, art, and culture as legally licensed educational travelers. The program will be led by Ambassador Charles Shapiro, President of the Institute and formerly Coordinator of Cuban Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. Few in our generation have been inside Cuba, and even fewer have had the inside access now being offered to you by the Institute. The Institute is offering an insider’s perspective to life in Cuba and the Cuba-US relationship. Participants will meet with high-ranking government officials, hear from entrepreneurs in the Cuban private sector, learn from professional Cuban artists and musicians and convene with diplomats and economists familiar with the intricacies of the island. Don’t miss this opportunity to study Cuban policy through the lens of the people and places that make it unique. Visits will be conducted in English or will have interpretation available.

Location:
Event Date: May 24, 2014
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The role of Remittances of Mexican Migrants in Mexico’s Economy: Support and factor of development
The seminar will be presented by Visiting Scholar, Andrés Guzman

Location: Deutz room, Copley Building, at the Institute of the Americas
Event Date: May 22, 2014
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XXIII La Jolla Energy Conference
The Western Hemisphere's top thought leaders present policy updates and outlooks on the year’s key energy trends, including North America’s unconventional resource revolution; the Golden Era of natural gas; Peru’s Camisea project turns 10; energy reform in Mexico;and electric power and upstream hydrocarbon investment updates from across the region.

Location: Institute of the Americas Plaza
Event Date: May 21, 2014
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Survival and the Undercommons of Terror
Junaid Rana is an Associate Professor of Asian American Studies with appointments in the Department of Anthropology, the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory. His interests include transnational cultural studies, diaspora studies; community organizing and social movements; critical and comparative race studies, political economy, the postcolonial state; South Asia/Pakistan/US.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: May 21, 2014
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A Public of Two Minds: Social Norms, Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties in Britain and Germany
Scott Blinder is Director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford. His research focuses on public opinion toward migration, multiculturalism, and related political issues. He has a PhD in Political Science from the University of Chicago. Prior to coming to COMPAS, he spent five years as a member of the sub-faculty of the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford. His primary line of research examines attitudes of native European majority-group populations toward immigration and multicultural policies. A particular interest is in investigating the extent, strength, and impact of social norms against racial and ethnic prejudice, how politicians can either use or circumvent such norms to pursue their electoral aims and influence public opinion about immigration. He has also conducted research on the politics of race and gender in the US.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: May 19, 2014
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Project on International Affairs (PIA) International Relations Speaker Series: Jessica Weeks, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jessica Weeks' research and teaching interests focus on the domestic politics of foreign policy, the domestic and international politics of authoritarian regimes, and public opinion about foreign policy. Her research has appeared in or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and International Organization. Her book, Dictators at War and Peace, explores the domestic politics of international conflict in dictatorships, and is forthcoming (2014) in the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs Series at Cornell University Press. Professor Weeks received her B.A. in political science from The Ohio State University in 2001, a Master’s degree in international history from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in 2003, and a PhD in political science from Stanford University in 2009. Prior to joining the Wisconsin faculty, Professor Weeks was an Assistant Professor of Government at Cornell University .

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: May 15, 2014
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Beyond 2014: U.S.-Pakistani Relations
Ambassador Munter will address the difficulties of the bilateral relationship between the United States and Pakistan, how these difficulties came to a head in 2011 during the Raymond Allen Davis incident and Osama bin Laden Abbottabad raid, and how, despite all the challenges, a fresh approach to Pakistan and the region is possible in years to come. IR/PS Dean Peter Cowhey will open the event. Professor of political science Barbara Walter will introduce Ambassador Munter and lead a Q&A. Now a current professor of international relations at Pomona College and fellow at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, Ambassador Cameron Munter spent three decades as a career diplomat in the U.S. Foreign Service. His last posting was as the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan from 2010 to 2012. During this period he guided U.S.-Pakistani relations through a succession of crises while leading a 2,500-employee embassy. He previously served as U.S. Ambassador to Serbia, where he negotiated Serbian domestic consensus for European integration and managed the Kosovo independence crisis. He is the recipient of the Gold Medal of the Polish Army and the Czech Republic’s Masaryk Medal. He earned a Distinguished Honor award, four Superior Honor awards and seven Senior Performance Pay awards from the Department of State. He has advised the Diplomatic Academy in Vienna and was Dean Rusk Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University in Washington. Before joining the foreign service, Ambassador Munter taught European history at the University of California, Los Angeles and directed European studies at the Twentieth Century Fund (now The Century Foundation) in New York City. Barbara Walter has been a fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, the War and Peace Institute at Columbia University and the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University. She is an expert on international security, with an emphasis on internal wars, bargaining and cooperation, and terrorism/counter-terrorism. Breakfast will accompany the discussion.

Location: Faculty Club
Event Date: May 14, 2014
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High and Low Tech Solutions that Improve Health and Combat Climate Change in South Asia
Project Surya has been studying the climate and health impacts of improved cookstoves in Rural India over the last 5 years. Field studies are identifying the impacts of improved cookstoves on air pollutants such as black carbon both indoors and outdoors, uncovering behavioral components of adoption, and looking to evaluate new stove technologies that may be more user friendly while still adhering to rigorous pollution reduction standards. In this talk, I will provide an overview of Project Surya's work, and discuss how low-cost wireless sensors are being used to both study and improve adoption. The sensors provide detailed measurements of usage, fuel consumption, and air quality improvements when switching from traditional mud stoves to improved cookstoves. This data is now being used to connect individual households to a carbon market. Micro-payments, transferred from a carbon market to an individual household on the basis of data from the sensors, can be used by households to finance improved cookstoves and sustain maintenance of these cleaner burning appliances. Nithya Ramanathan is a Co-Founder and President of Nexleaf Analytics, an Assistant Research Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and a Co-PI for Project Surya. Ramanathan began developing mobile phone sensing applications after joining UCLA as a research faculty member, where she received one of the highly competitive NIH Challenge Grants to develop mobile platforms to improve the cardiovascular health of women. At Nexleaf Analytics, Ramanathan leads the strategy, vision, and partnerships to develop and evaluate the use of low-cost mobile phone sensors in global health and environmental applications. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA and holds a BS degree from University of California at Berkeley in Electrical Engineering. Alex Zahnd has a mechanical engineering degree (BSc) from Switzerland, a Masters (MSc) in Renewable Energy and a PhD in Renewable Energy with the thesis topic: "The Role of Renewable Energy Technology in Holistic Community Development" from Murdoch University in Western Australia. His industrial experience ranges from development projects in extrusion technology for the food and plastic industry, to pharmaceutical production plants. He has lived and worked off and on since 1983 in Nepal and since 1996 in the remotest and poorest mountain communities in the Himalayas. Since 2002, he combined his extensive field project experience and applied academic research projects by developing and leading a long-term holistic community development project and a High Altitude Research Station, in the very remote and impoverished north-western district of Humla, through the established non-profit NGO RIDS-Nepal (www.rids-nepal.org). From 2001-2011 he has been teaching a Renewable Energy course at the Kathmandu University as well as being active in applied research and application of renewable energy technologies for communities and industries in developing countries. Through his engagement and dedication in the field of applied HCD in remote Nepalese villages and his involvement in academic education of engineers in Nepal, he was elected as a member of the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences (SATW) in 2007. Since 2012. he is a Visiting Scholar at UCSD in California USA. Co-sponsored by UCSD Center on Global Justice and the Department of Anthropology

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: May 14, 2014
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Green Economy in China: Actions, Effects and Challenges
After three decades of rapid economic growth with unchecked environmental pollution, the Chinese government has recently started to promote “green economy" to achieve sustainable development. For example, the Third Plenum of the 18th Chinese Communist Party Congress in the last year raised the lofty goal of “ecological civilization.” Although China has made progress to slow environmental degradation, it still faces mounting challenges to maintain a clean environment while keeping its economy growing. Dr. Xia's talk will discuss the policy instruments and obstacles on developing a green economy. Dr. Xia Guang is the director general and senior research fellow at the Policy Research Center for Environment and Economy, part of China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP). He is a member of the Science and Technology Committee of MEP and a member of the High Level Intergovernmental Advisory Panel for the Global Environmental Outlook of the United Nations Environment Programme. He is also engaged as a governmental member of the China Public Diplomacy Association, member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese Society of Environmental Sciences, and professor at Renmin University of China and Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. He has published seven books, more than 200 journal articles and led more than 60 research projects, and was awarded the Scientific and Technological Award from MEP and the Excellent Doctoral Dissertation award at Renmin University.

Location: Sanford Consortium Roth Auditorium
Event Date: May 14, 2014
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Pesos to Pasos, Dihrams to Dingies: The Role of Export Processing Wages in Migration from Mexico and Morocco
Kathy Kopinak is a Canadian sociologist who began formal research on northern Mexico in the early 1980s when North America's old industrial heartland started to dramatically transfer production to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Sandwiches available on a first come, first served basis. Please contact Lisa Lee with questions.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: May 14, 2014
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TEQUILA TALK WITH DR. DAVID SHIRK: ORGANIZED CRIME, CITIZEN SECURITY AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
Mexico’s security crisis and high levels of criminal violence pose a threat to the Mexican state and to citizens. For the last decade, numerous public opinion surveys have demonstrated that the proliferation of violence has made “inseguridad” the nation’s top concern, with broad swaths of the population believing that the government has neither the will nor the ability to control the violence. In the absence of a satisfactory state response, citizens and business groups have joined together in a number of civic initiatives. While some have been armed, such as the self-defense groups in Apatzingán, countless others are non-violent collaborative efforts to seek justice, push for accountability and promote a culture of lawfulness. Please join us for a conversation with Dr. Shirk as we discuss the range of civic responses to violence. What ways have citizens and communities fought back against organized crime? What opportunities exist for these groups to engage with authorities? Have any of them been able to move the needle on public policy? And how can US policy bolster Mexico’s efforts?

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: May 14, 2014
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Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered
Ruth Klüger was eleven years old when she and her mother were deported from her native Vienna to Theresienstadt, the Nazis' "model ghetto." Twelve grueling months later, she was deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Klüger emigrated to the United States where she became a professor of German literature. In 1992 she published her memoir Still Alive, one of the most successful and unconventional Holocaust memoirs ever written. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards, Klüger lives in Irvine, California, where she continues to write. At this event, she will be introduced by history professor Frank Biess.

Location: Great Hall: International House
Event Date: May 14, 2014
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Human Rights and Racism in Latin America, Revisited: Guatemala
Human Rights and Racism in Latin America, Revisited: Guatemala

Location: Deutz Room in the Copley Conference Center at the Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: May 13, 2014
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International Center World Forum / Issues Binding Seven Billion: Oil, Blood and Water
The International Center's World Forum announces the spring quarter date for "Issues Binding Seven Billion: Oil, Blood, & Water" on Tuesday at noon: May 13 Water/Climate. How has your community been shaped by this issue? Join the discussion over a free light lunch in the International Center Courtyard. This participatory discussion series supports the exchange of ideas and viewpoints among students from around the globe. No need to register. If you are willing to help start the event with your perspective, please contact Martin Lahtov at mlahtov@ucsd.edu.

Location: International Center, Patio
Event Date: May 13, 2014
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Project on International Affairs (PIA) International Relations Speaker Series: Scott Sagan, Stanford
Scott D. Sagan is the Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science, the Mimi and Peter Haas University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University. He also serves as the co-chair of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Global Nuclear Future Initiative. Before joining the Stanford faculty, Sagan was a lecturer in the Department of Government at Harvard University and served as a special assistant to the director of the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Pentagon. He has served as a consultant to the office of the Secretary of Defense and at the Sandia National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Sagan was the recipient of the International Studies Association's International Security Studies Section Distinguished Scholar Award in 2013. He has also won four teaching awards: the Monterey Institute for International Studies’ Nonproliferation Education Award in 2009; the International Studies Association’s 2008 Innovative Teaching Award; Stanford University’s 1998-99 Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching; and Stanford's 1996 Hoagland Prize for Undergraduate Teaching.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: May 08, 2014
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The World Diplomatic Forum Conference 2014
The World Diplomatic Forum Conference 2014, the Ambassadorial Roundtable’s annual conference, will bring together over 200 International and US Ambassadors, Diplomats, Business Leaders, Academics and Investors with vast economic and political networks. Participants will work closely together to advance international initiatives in cybersecurity, healthcare, education, defense, diplomacy, clean-tech, and bio-pharma. Valuable business contacts and friendships will be formed while impacting key global diplomatic issues and fostering cooperation between established and emerging powers Diplomats and subject matter experts will chair daily track dialogs, which will take place in a roundtable forum. Attendees are invited to partake in track discussions as we seek to advance international initiatives relative to each field: International Diplomacy Business Investment Capital Academia Government

Location: Rady School of Management
Event Date: May 08, 2014
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Atomic Aversion and Just War Doctrine: Evidence from Survey Experiments
Scott D. Sagan is the Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science, the Mimi and Peter Haas University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University. He also serves as the co-chair of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Global Nuclear Future Initiative. Before joining the Stanford faculty, Sagan was a lecturer in the Department of Government at Harvard University and served as a special assistant to the director of the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Pentagon. He has served as a consultant to the office of the Secretary of Defense and at the Sandia National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Sagan was the recipient of the International Studies Association's International Security Studies Section Distinguished Scholar Award in 2013. He has also won four teaching awards: the Monterey Institute for International Studies’ Nonproliferation Education Award in 2009; the International Studies Association’s 2008 Innovative Teaching Award; Stanford University’s 1998-99 Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching; and Stanford's 1996 Hoagland Prize for Undergraduate Teaching.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: May 08, 2014
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The Role of the PRI in Mexico’s Emergence from Feudalism and Mercantilism after the Revolution
Before being known as a modern-day traveler, Irving Tragen taught courses on comparative labor law, Latin American social and labor history, and development strategies at several colleges and universities, including Mexico City College, American University, University of Chile and the Universidad Autonoma of El Salvador. He studied Article 123 and the Mexican Labor Code with Dr. Mario de las Cuevas, the principal drafter of both documents. Sandwiches available on a first come, first served basis.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: May 07, 2014
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Can e-payments fix India's social safety net?
Professors Muralidharan and Niehaus will discuss their current research on the impact of using biometric smartcard payments in India to improve the implementation and efficiency of anti-poverty programs. This research was conducted in partnership with the government using one of the largest randomized controlled trials ever done, and is directly relevant to understanding the likely impacts of India's ambitious initiative to provide all residents with a biometric Unique ID linked to a bank account. Karthik Muralidharan is an assistant professor of economics at UC San Diego, where he has been on the faculty since 2008. He is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, junior affiliate at the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, member of the Jameel Poverty Action Lab network, affiliate at the Center for Effective Global Action and research affiliate with Innovations for Poverty Action. Read his complete bio. Paul Niehaus is also an assistant professor at UC San Diego, as well as faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, junior affiliate at the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, affiliate of the Jameel Poverty Action Lab and affiliate at the Center for Effective Global Action. He is also co-founder and president of the nonprofit GiveDirectly. In 2013, Foreign Policy named him one of its leading 100 "Global Thinkers." Read his complete bio.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Divisible Conference Room
Event Date: May 07, 2014
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Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture: "China's Current Challenges & U.S. China Relations"
China and its new leadership are at an important domestic policy crossroads just as the risk profile of their neighborhood in Northeast Asia is spiking. Ambassador Clark T. Randt, Jr. will discuss these challenges and risks, and their importance for United States-China relations. Ambassador Randt is the longest-serving United States Ambassador to the People’s Republic of China. He is a diplomat, lawyer and businessperson with more than 30 years of direct experience in Asia. Randt was nominated by President George W. Bush, confirmed by the Senate and sworn into office as ambassador in July 2001. He served in the post until January 2009. Randt graduated from Yale University with a bachelor’s degree in 1968 and received his law degree from the University of Michigan in 1975. He also attended Harvard Law School where he was awarded the East Asia Legal Studies Traveling Fellowship to China. Randt serves on the boards of UPS and Qualcomm, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. The Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture is named after Ambassador Robert "Bob" Ellsworth (1926-2011), a highly respected public servant, a patriot and a national treasure. He had a diverse and illustrious career as a lawyer, politician, statesman, diplomat, strategist and investor. He was also a scholar who fought for the advancement of American leadership, security and principles. A reception will follow Randt’s talk. Note: Recording, taping or Tweeting during the talk, Q&A and reception will not be allowed.

Location: The Great Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: May 06, 2014
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Deadly Implications: The Recent Rise of Sectarianism in Syria
The growth in the number and frequency of sectarian incidents and conflict, particularly in Iraq, Lebanon and Syria (as well as in such disparate states as Egypt, Indonesia and Malaysia) has been accompanied by the growth of increasingly violent forms of Sunni fundamentalism. Given that most contemporary manifestations of ‘sectarianism’ are also forms of ‘anti-Shi‘ism’, it is not surprising that the two phenomena have gone hand in hand. The rise of what may be called ‘political Shi‘ism’ since the Iranian revolution, buttressed by developments in Iraq and Lebanon, evidently troubles regimes and individuals in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf, the principal backers of Sunni extremism. Jabhat al-Nusra and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant are the main exemplars of this tendency in Syria. Peter Sluglett’s paper will attempt to chronicle and analyse these developments, with a particular focus on Syria since the beginning of the uprising, but also in the context of the ‘religious policy’ of the Syrian government since the 1980s, and events in neighbouring states. In general, as observers of Iraq since 2003 are well aware, it is extremely difficult to force the sectarian genie back into the bottle once it has been released, which does not bode well for the future peace and stability of Syria (or of Iraq, or of Lebanon, for that matter). Peter Sluglett is a historian of the 19th and 20th century Arab Middle East, of the area which is now Iraq, Syria and Lebanon. He is interested in 'straight' political and socio-economic history, as well as in the urban social history of a somewhat wider area (the Arab Mashreq as a whole, i.e. Egypt, 'Greater Syria' and ‘Iraq'), the realities and the legacy of colonial rule in the region, especially between about 1920 and 1948, and dictatorship, opposition and the possibilities for democracy.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: May 06, 2014
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Asian/Pacific Islander Council: Night at the Padres
Celebrate UC San Diego with the Triton Family—including faculty, staff, alumni and current students—from the rooftop of the historic Western Metal Building at PETCO Park. All guests will receive a "UCSD @ the Padres" T-shirt and tickets for seating directly adjacent to the reception location. You're welcome to watch the game from either location. Baseball fare will be served and is included in your registration: Rimel's Rotisserie Chicken Rimel's Stir-Fried Vegetables Rimel's Rice & Chipotle Beans Hot Dogs with Condiments 3rd Inning Snacks - Peanuts Soda Water Beer will be available for purchase

Location: Petco Park
Event Date: May 06, 2014
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Libertad Bajo Palabra: Censorship, Satire & the Press in Mexico
If a free press and a free society go hand in hand, by most accounts for most of its recent history Mexico has had neither. During the 20th century, as the story goes, the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) famously developed a panoply of tactics to produce a docile press, balancing the carrots of lucrative government advertising and cash-stuffed envelopes slipped to journalists against the cudgels of censorship and the lurking threat of violence. Most commentators tend to think of the 20th century Mexican press as something of a journalistic eunuch, self censoring and obediently toeing the party line. In recent years, almost endemic violence against journalists reporting on the drug trade has seemingly darkened the outlook for Mexico’s press. Looking beyond the headlines of Mexico City’s major papers, however, it has become increasingly clear that the relationship between the government, the press and the public was and is far more complex than previously thought and that the challenges facing journalists today are being met with courage and innovation. This conference brings together papers that will enrich our understanding of both the past and the present of Mexican journalism, from the experience of the PRI regime to the process of democratization and the contemporary specter of narcoviolence. Contributors will explore how the press has functioned as a more open space for critique than commonly believed, examining the codes, negotiations and strategies that have enabled open expression, as well as offering new discussions of the nuanced mechanisms of official control and censorship. Bringing together academics and journalists from both sides of the border, this conference seeks to expand our understanding of what a free press has meant to Mexico during the 20th and 21st centuries in four sessions: “The Press and the Public Sphere,” “The PRI and the Press,” “Perspectives on Censorship and Democratization,” and a final roundtable discussion on censorship, democracy and contemporary challenges. View the full conference agenda with schedule and speakers. On Wednesday, April 30, Alfredo Corchado, Mexico bureau chief at the Dallas Morning News and author of "Midnight in Mexico," will be giving the keynote address to open the conference.

Location: UC San Diego, The Village West (building two), Meeting Rooms on 2 (ground level)
Event Date: May 01, 2014
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A Reporter's Journey through Mexico's Drug War with Alfredo Corchado
Alfredo Corchado, Mexico bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, is a noted expert on immigration, drug violence and foreign policy between the United States and Mexico. He has reported on everything from the disappearance of women in Juarez to the exodus of Mexico’s middle class to the United States. Over the years Corchado has exposed government corruption and the reach of Mexican drug traffickers into U.S. communities. He has described the perils that journalists face and the disturbing result: an increasingly silent Mexican press. As a result of his reporting on the drug violence, Corchado has received numerous death threats that have forced him to leave Mexico for periods of time. He is a 1984 graduate of El Paso Community College and a 1987 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso. A 2009 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and a 2010 Rockefeller Fellow and Woodrow Wilson Scholar, Corchado won the Maria Moors Cabot award from Columbia Journalism School in 2007 for extraordinary bravery and enterprise. In 2010 he was awarded Colby College’s Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. Corchado’s keynote address begins the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies’ two-day conference, "Libertad Bajo Palabra: Censorship, Satire, and the Press in Mexico.” Four sessions on Thursday, May 1 bring together academics and journalists from both sides of the border in a quest to expand our understanding of what a free press has meant to Mexico during the 20th and 21st centuries. There will be a reception following Corchado’s address.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Malamud Conference Room at the Weaver Center
Event Date: Apr 30, 2014
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Webinar: The Future of Natural Gas in Brazil
In the last few years, Brazil has emerged as an important hydrocarbons player in the Western Hemisphere, largely due to the abundant oil reserves in the pre-salt basins offshore. Meanwhile, Brazil’s natural gas sector has lagged behind. Despite significant natural gas reserves, institutional and financial hurdles as well as inadequate infrastructure have limited domestic production, leaving Brazil to meet its internal demand with continued imports from Bolivia and, more recently, by way of expensive imported LNG. Join us for a webinar discussion of the future of natural gas in Brazil with Sylvie D’Apote, managing partner at Prysma Consultants and formerly managing partner at Gas Energy, Brazil. D’Apote will discuss perspectives for increasing natural gas production in Brazil, expected gas demand growth and diversification, and the evolving supply-demand balance and future of LNG imports in Brazil. D’Apote’s presentation will be followed by an interactive question and answer session with the audience. If you are interested but unable to attend the live event, please register anyway and we will send you the recording.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Apr 30, 2014
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Border Modernization and the Economy: an Inside Look
Earlier this year, the San Ysidro border modernization project received a boost of more than $200 million, a boon to the improvement of infrastructure at the busiest land border crossing in the Western Hemisphere. Inadequate infrastructure has led to delays at our ports of entry that have had a staggering effect not only on our regional economy, but also on our national economy. However, this breakthrough in federal funding for the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry Modernization and Expansion Projectwill reduce wait times and allow for more efficient movement of goods and people. Please join us for a conversation with Congressman Scott Peters to discuss the importance of the border to our competitiveness, both regional and national. Congressman Peters will be joined by experts from SANDAG and GSA to discuss the local impacts of obtaining funding for border modernization. Congressman Peters will share insights on the struggles of taking the San Diego collaborative spirit to Washington D.C. in order to shape the discussions on the border and educate our nation's lawmakers on the impacts of the border beyond the San Diego region. Institute of the Americas’ President Ambassador Charles Shapiro will moderate. This event is free and open to the public; however, we do ask that you register in advance to ensure adequate seating.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 24, 2014
Photo By Center for U.S.- Mexican Studies
Scholarship and Policy: How Academics Engage Policymakers
Denise Ducheny, former senator and current manager of the Three-Californias Program at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies.

Location: IOA Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Apr 23, 2014
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Changing Forms of Corruption in India
Akhil Gupta Professor, Anthropology UCLA

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Apr 23, 2014
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U.S Leadership in the 21st Century: The Human Rights Viewpoint
Join IAG to hear Carroll Bogert, Deputy Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, for a discussion on whether rising powers of the global south will incorporate human rights into their foreign policies, and whether China will remain a dissenting voice on human rights.

Location: The Great Hall
Event Date: Apr 21, 2014
Photo By Lynn Stephen
We are the Face of Oaxaca: Testimony and Social Movements
ynn Stephen is distinguished professor of arts and sciences, professor of anthropology, and director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies at the University of Oregon. She is the author of "Transborder Lives: Indigenous Oaxacans in Mexico, California, and Oregon" and "Zapotec Women: Gender, Class, and Ethnicity in Globalized Oaxaca." About the book: A massive uprising against the Mexican state of Oaxaca began with the emergence of the Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO) in June 2006. A coalition of more than 300 organizations, APPO disrupted the functions of Oaxaca’s government for six months. It began to develop an inclusive and participatory political vision for the state. The movement was met with violent repression. Participants were imprisoned, tortured and even killed. Lynn Stephen emphasizes the crucial role of testimony in human rights work, indigenous cultural history, community and indigenous radio, and women’s articulation of their rights to speak and be heard. She also explores transborder support for APPO, particularly among Oaxacan immigrants in Los Angeles. UC San Diego Bookstore will be on hand with Stephen's work. They are unable to accept credit cards at this event; cash, check, student accounts and UC San Diego budget index numbers are welcome.

Location: Gildred Latin American Studies Building
Event Date: Apr 17, 2014
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Choke Point: China
The water-energy-food choke point is forcing a new 21st century reckoning. Three colliding trends – declining freshwater reserves, booming energy demand and uncertain grain supplies – are disrupting economies, governments and environments around the world. China’s energy and environmental security is threatened as the country hits these choke points. How China deals with these confrontations has significant domestic and global consequences. At this talk, Jennifer Turner, director of Woodrow Wilson Center’s China Environment Forum, will dive into the major water-energy-food nexus trends in China and her work on engaging Chinese policy, research, business and NGOs to address these natural-resource choke points. Turner has been the director of the China Environment Forum for 14 years where she creates meetings, exchanges and publications focusing on a variety of energy and environmental challenges facing China, as well as environmental nongovernmental organizations, environmental journalism and environmental governance in China. She serves as editor of the Wilson Center’s journal "China Environment Series," which is distributed to over 5,000 environmental practitioners around the world. She received a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Comparative Politics in 1997 from Indiana University, Bloomington. Her dissertation examined local government innovation in implementing water policies in the China.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 3201
Event Date: Apr 17, 2014
Photo By Center for U.S.- Mexican Studies
Securing Labor, Freeing the Worker
Speaker: USMEX Visiting Fellow Casey Lurtz, University of Chicago Date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Time: 12:30 - 2 p.m. Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room Open to: Public Casey Lurtz is a doctoral candidate in Latin American history focusing on the social and economic history of Mexico in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Her current research uses the development of the coffee economy of southern Mexico to argue that local needs and efforts, not state mandate or foreign interests, dictated the shape of modernization in rural Porfirian Mexico.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Apr 16, 2014
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Creating New Connected Economies: How ICT and Mobile Technology are Rapidly Changing Emerging Economies
In this conversation, Chris Locke and Craig McIntosh will discuss how emerging economies benefit from leapfrogging to a 21st century technology industry model, as well as the opportunities and challenges this brings to governments and policy makers. They will focus on mobile money, entrepreneurship and how the Silicon Valley model of technology development is being exported to emerging countries globally. Previously the managing director of GSMA Mobile for Development, Chris Locke is the founder of Caribou Digital, working with development organizations to build digital economies in emerging markets. He helps take critical mobile services such as health, farm, money and learning tools to scale, to help countries develop at a nationwide level. Mr. Locke has spent the past 15 years working in the mobile and internet industries for companies including the Virgin Group Ltd., Three, AOL Inc. and T-Mobile. Previously, he was also the Xerox Lecturer in Electronic Communication and Publishing at University College London, and he has maintained strong links to the research community. He is coeditor of “Thumb Culture: The Meaning of Mobile Phones in Society,” an anthology of research considering the global social effect of mobile technology. Craig McIntosh is a development economist whose work focuses on program evaluation. His main research interest is the design of institutions which promote the provision of financial services to micro-entrepreneurs. He is co-director of the new UC San Diego Policy Design and Evaluation Laboratory (PDEL).

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall
Event Date: Apr 16, 2014
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Providing Culturally Responsive and Empowering Services for Latino Families
Celia Jaes Falicov, PhD is an internationally known family therapy author, teacher, and clinician. She is currently a Clinical Professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, where she is also Director of Mental Health Services at the Student-Run Free Clinic. She also maintains a private practice and provides clinical consultation, supervision and workshops. Dr. Falicov was born and raised in Argentina. She later moved to the United States where she received a PhD in Human Development from the University of Chicago. Ellen Beck, MD, clinical professor of medicine in the UC San Diego School of Medicine’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, has been named a 2011 Health Hero by WebMD Magazine. Each year, WebMD Magazine “celebrates visionary Americans who have overcome daunting health challenges to give back to others in truly inspiring ways.” The Health Heroes are announced in the November/December issue.

Location: Conference Room 115, Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building
Event Date: Apr 16, 2014
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Stories in the Ice: What Can Past Climate Tell Us about Our Future?
Drilling down thousands of meters into the ancient ice preserved on Earth’s massive continental ice sheets, scientists can extract a wealth of information about our climate history—including periods both much colder and considerably warmer than today. Ice, dust, and tiny gas bubbles in Greenland and Antarctic ice provide myriad clues into the complex workings of Earth’s climate system. Join Jeff Severinghaus as he describes how he delves into Earth’s climate past to gain insight into our climate future.

Location: Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Event Date: Apr 14, 2014
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Foreign Detachment: The Making and Unmaking of Cross-Border Ties
Roger Waldinger is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at UCLA. He has worked on international migration throughout his career, writing on a broad set of topics, including immigrant entrepreneurship, labor markets, assimilation, the second generation, high-skilled immigration, immigration policy, and public opinion. The author of six books, most recently, How the Other Half Works: Immigration and the Social Organization of Labor (University of California Press, 2003), Waldinger is a 2008 Guggenheim Fellow; his research has been supported by grants from the Ford, Haines, Mellon, National Science, Sloan and Russell Sage Foundations.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 101
Event Date: Apr 10, 2014
Photo By Center for U.S.- Mexican Studies
Mobile Technology at the Border
Speaker: Chris Locke, founder of Caribu Digital, with UC San Diego's Ganz Chockalingam and Brett Stalbaum

Location: IOA Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Apr 09, 2014
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Social Sciences Supper Club – What’s Next for U.S. Immigration Reform and Border Enforcement?
A comprehensive immigration reform bill backed by a bipartisan Senate majority and President Obama is currently causing tremendous controversy. This presentation will examine the political, demographic, and economic origins of immigration reform and the prospects for passage. Drawing on research conducted by UCSD students, we will discuss how current U.S. policies are affecting migration from Mexico to the United States. With David FitzGerald, Co-Director of CCIS and the Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations at UCSD Supper Club events include a wine reception, full dinner and Faculty Club parking in addition to the lecture. $65 per person; $50 alumni price.

Location: Faculty Club
Event Date: Apr 08, 2014
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Sex, Money & Death: Yan Lianke on Literary Creativity and Censorship
Yan Lianke is one of China’s most distinguished — and most controversial — writers. His work often pushes the envelope of the official censorship system, but two of his novels banned in China are now available in English translations. In a way more heart-wrenching and fantastic than Mo Yan, China’s latest winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Yan grounds his literary imagination on his native soil and his vivid memory of childhood hunger. His recent work, "Lenin's Kisses," delivers a series of daring, riveting, at times humorous and at times disturbing portraits of the trappings and consequences of greed and corruption at the heart of humanity. Not banned in China, it too is available in English. Yan has been awarded the Lu Xun Literary Prize and the Lao She Literary Award, two of China’s most-prestigious honors for literature, and in 2013 was shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize. He currently lives and writes in Beijing. Yan's three novels published in English translation: "Serve the People!" (Grove Press, 2008), "Dream of Ding Village" (Grove Press, 2011) and "Lenin's Kisses" (Grove Press, 2012). Copies of his work will be available for purchase, and Yan will autograph books for attendees.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Auditorium, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 08, 2014
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Reflections on Prince Rupert's Dog: Withcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War
In this talk, Mark Stoyle explores the fantastical rumors which circulated around Charles I's famous nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine, and his dog, “Boy”, during the English Civil War of 1642-46: rumors which suggested that Rupert was an occult practitioner, while his canine companion - far from being a genuine dog - was in fact a beautiful woman who had transformed herself into the shape of an animal through magical art. The paper demonstrates how these ideas were spread - by both Roundhead and Cavalier polemicists - and suggests that the story of Prince Rupert's 'necromantic dog' should not be dismissed as an amusing, but essentially trivial, side-show. Instead, the paper argues, the story of Boy has much wider ramifications, not only alerting us to the sheer skill and cunning with which both Parliamentarian and Royalist hacks strove to exploit occult motifs in support of their cause, but also providing a new perspective on the ways in which popular and elite ideas about politics and the supernatural converged and interacted with each other during the troubled 1640s. Mark Stoyle is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Southampton. He is the author of Loyalty and Locality: Popular Allegiance in Devon during the English Civil War (1994), From Deliverance to Destruction: Rebellion and Civil War in an English City (1996), West Britons: Cornish Identities and the Early Modern British State (2002), Circled with Stone: Exeter's City Walls 1485-1660 (UEP, 2003), Soldiers and Strangers: An Ethnic History of the English Civil War (2005), and The Black Legend of Prince Rupert’s Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda During the English Civil War (2011).

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Apr 08, 2014
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The Global Resource Game and the Future of Energy
As its economy flourishes, China is engaged in a far-flung quest for natural resources across the globe. Beijing’s appetite for natural resources is restructuring markets, pushing up commodity prices, transforming resource-rich economies through investment and trade, including the Western Hemisphere. But despite China’s role in the global resource game, it is far from the only player. Booming oil and gas production in the United States continues to send ripples across the Western Hemisphere and beyond. We are delighted to invite you to join us on Tuesday, April 8 at 6:30pm for a discussion on the future of energy with Michael Levi, the David M. Rubenstein Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment and Director of the Program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Levi will discuss the global implications of this changing energy landscape, and its impact on China, the United States and the Western Hemisphere more broadly. He will also inform us what China’s economic growth means for global climate change. Dr. Levi is also the author of two recent books, By All Means Necessary: How China’s Resource Quest is Changing the World (co-authored with Elizabeth Economy) and The Power Surge: Energy, Opportunity, and the Battle for America’s Future. Both books will be available for purchase and Dr. Levi will be available for a signing after the talk.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Apr 08, 2014
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Public Health in Mexico
Speaker: Gabriella Conti, assistant professor at University College London

Location: IOA Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Apr 07, 2014
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Project on International Affairs (PIA) International Relations Speaker Series: Jesse Driscoll, UCSD
Jesse Driscoll is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the UC San Diego School of International Relatoins and Pacific Studies (IR/PS). His primary area of interest is mapping the processes by which hierarchies emerge after periods of violence. His working hypothesis is that in the modern state system, national governments establish legitimate authority through a process of identifying, labeling, monitoring, and ultimately socializing unruly populations. How (and whether) third-party assistance can aid in these tasks is disputed. Driscoll's work has focused especially on theories that account for both variation in patterns of violence against civilians and variation in settlement strategies by armed groups. His forthcoming book, Exiting Anarchy: Militia Politics after the Post-Soviet Wars, examines mechanisms of civil war settlement after state failure. He is currently managing a number of research projects in Georgia and Tajikistan, mapping social networks, party formation, voter intimidation, and the range of technologies used by semi-authoritarian regimes to stay in power.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Apr 03, 2014
Photo By Center for U.S.- Mexican Studies
Policy Challenges Through Political Pragmatism, the Mexican Case
Dr. Roderic Camp will examine what the new administration of Enrique Pena Nieto has accomplished during his first 14 months in office. Camp believes the most significant political achievement of the PRI to date is the Pacto por Mexico. He argues that it has the potential for being the most influential political outcome since the 2000 election. Moreover, Camp will analyze why this is such a demarcation from past democratic politics and what these changes mean in the larger context of Mexican democracy. Camp is the Philip McKenna Professor of the Pacific Rim at Claremont McKenna College. He serves as a founding advisory board member of the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars of the Smithsonian Institution, and is an elected member of the Council on Foreign Relations, New York City. Camp is a member of the editorial board of Mexican Studies, and is a frequent consultant to national and international media, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio and the BBC. He is the author of numerous articles and 30 books on Mexico. He is the recipient of an honorary doctorate in humane letters from St. Olaf College for his scholarship and teaching on Mexico.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 1201
Event Date: Apr 02, 2014
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Who Favors Discriminating Against Immigrants' Access to Jobs?
Please join Abdeslam Marfouk for his presentation concerning European perceptions of immigration and employment rights. Utilizing data from the European Values ??Study (EVS), the seminar focuses on European attitudes towards immigrants, especially European preference for discrimination against immigrants in terms of access to jobs. On average, 67 percent of European Union citizens agree with the statement that when jobs are scarce, employers should give priority to citizens over non-naturalized immigrants. The main objective of this talk is to answer to the following question: “Who favors discriminating against immigrants’ access to jobs?” and examine the relationship between the clichés against immigration and this discrimination.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Apr 02, 2014
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Sayed Kashua: Satire and Pop-Culture in Israel
Noted as one of the most important contemporary writers in the Hebrew Language, Sayed Kashua offers fresh perspective on Israeli culture. Hillel UCSD will bring the writer and creator of the hit Israeli show, for an episode screening and discussion called “Satire & Pop Culture in Israel” on Wednesday, April 2 at 7 p.m. at the Institute of the Americas. Most recently, he is the creator of the acclaimed television show Arab Labor, a comedy about Amjad, a Palestinian journalist and Israeli citizen in search of his identity. The program is said to pierce the taboos of acceptable language and humor surrounding the prickly, long-standing status quo in which Palestinians and Israelis live side-by-side. Kashua is also the author of four books, one of which one the 2011 Bernstein Prize. He is also a frequent contributor to Ha’aretz.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, Hojel Hall
Event Date: Apr 02, 2014
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Institute President Charles Shapiro on the Unrest in Venezuela
While the world is focused on Ukraine, the unrest in Venezuela continues. Despite the Maduro government’ s crackdown on protesters, the death of at least 33 people, and 3000 arrests, protests continue across the country. The Venezuelan Attorney General conceded on Sunday that there have been abuses by the government. What began as student protests against chronic shortages and mismanagement of the economy has grown into nationwide unrest as government responses have provoked more protest. Three opposition mayors have been jailed, the Speaker of the National Assembly has brought charges of “aggravated defamation” against a newspaper, and the Assembly is in the process of stripping a deputy’s legal immunity so she can be charged with treason. The Organization of American States is unable to act and the association of South American countries, UNASUR, refuses to do so. The ongoing political upheaval in the country exposes increasing volatility and risk of violence. Please join us for a talk with Institute President Charles Shapiro, former U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela, as he discusses what the unrest might mean for Venezuela and for the United States.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Mar 25, 2014
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The Ukraine and Russia in Europe and the World
The IICAS European Lecture Series, with the support of the LLP programme of the European Union, present a panel on the current crisis in the Ukraine: Moderator: Peter Gourevitch (IR/PS, UCSD) Panelists: Amelia Glaser (Literature, UCSD): Deep Historical, Cultural, and Ideological Roots: Russians, Jews, and Ukrainians Philip Roeder (Political Science, UCSD): The Crimea: Russia and the Ukraine Christina Schneider (Political Science & Jean Monnet Chair, UCSD): The European Perspective Miles Kahler (IR/PS, UCSD): The Global Perspective

Location: SSB 107
Event Date: Mar 18, 2014
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Political Effects of Rumors & Rumor Rebuttals in China
Haifeng Huang is an assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. He obtained his Ph.D. from Duke University and was a postdoctoral fellow in formal theory and quantitative methods at Princeton University before joining UC Merced. His substantive interests include political economics, media, public opinion, and Chinese politics, and his methodological interests include formal modeling, surveys, and experiments. One of his publications, titled “Signal Left, Turn Right”, explains why China often simultaneously engages in reform on the one hand and conservative ideological and rhetorical activities on the other, which is relevant to some recent developments in the country.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 3201
Event Date: Mar 12, 2014
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Global Manufacturing and Japan's Energy Challenges
Much of the world's manufactured goods are produced in Asia, and Japan is one of the region's leading players. Japanese companies provide leading products to consumers as well as critical-input parts and materials to the global supply chain anchored in the region. But can Japan sustain this role? On the anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake and related events at Fukushima, we discuss Japan's global manufacturing system and the domestic challenges of creating a supportive setting, in particular in terms of energy policy.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Auditorium
Event Date: Mar 11, 2014
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Cuba: Raúl, Reforms and the Road Ahead
As economic reforms in Cuba gain momentum, a small yet growing private sector is emerging, Cubans can buy and sell real estate, and a growing number of citizens are taking advantage of reduced travel restrictions. The shift away from central planning toward a hybrid model brings with it questions about what Cuba will look like in the future and how the government will deal with new challenges like increasing inequality. These reforms, while seemingly protracted, will have significant implications for the island, the U.S.-Cuba relationship, U.S. business interests and the rest of Latin America. Join us March 10 for a panel discussion to explore the road ahead for Cuba economically and politically as reform measures are implemented. We will hear from Carlos Saladrigas, Chairman of the Cuba Study Group, an advocacy group aimed at promoting Cuban civil society and national reconciliation as well as Dr. Richard Feinberg, a noted scholar on Cuban issues and author of “Soft Landing in Cuba? Emerging Entrepreneurs and Middle Classes”, a Brookings report that assesses the emerging private sector. Ambassador Charles Shapiro, President of the Institute and formerly Coordinator of Cuban Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, will moderate.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Mar 10, 2014
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Rift! Geologic Clues to What’s Tearing Africa Apart
East Africa is one of the most geologically intriguing places on the planet – a place where the African continent is literally ripping apart. Deep rift valleys, active volcanoes, and hot springs are dramatic evidence for the powerful forces deep within the earth that are slowly reshaping the continent. Join geochemist David Hilton as he takes us on an adventure to the East African Rift Valley and describes how he and his colleagues utilize geologic samples to understand this dynamic region of our planet.

Location: Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Event Date: Mar 10, 2014
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Rebranding Israel - A Conversation with Ido Aharoni, Consul General of Israel in New York
As of August 2010, Ido Aharoni assumed the post of Acting Consul General at the Consulate General of Israel in New York, serving the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. He has been a member of Israel's Foreign Service since the summer of 1991. During his tenure in Israel's diplomatic corps Aharoni held two overseas positions, in Los Angeles and New York. In September 2007, Aharoni was appointed to serve as the Head of Israel's Brand Management Team in Jerusalem. In the spring of 2006, he was appointed to serve as a Senior Advisor to Israel's Foreign Minister and Vice Prime Minister, in charge of media and public affairs.

Location: Rady School of Management
Event Date: Mar 10, 2014
Photo By IICAS
Liberty and Fear: A History of Europe, 1000–2000
Constantin Fasolt’s project develops a historically grounded diagnosis of our time. By bringing Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations to bear on what we already know about European history, he tries to show that circumstances coincided twice in the past millennium (ca. 1000, ca. 1500) to launch Europe on a new phase in its historical development, leading to new extremes of liberty and fear. Each phase began with an explosive exercise of liberty when a whole archive of old truths lost meaning to rapid social change. Each phase created a new society. Each phase ended with the violent disintegration of the new society and the remains of a new archive with a forgotten meaning. The diagnosis at which Fasolt arrives is that today we face the same conjunction of old truths with rapid social change that drove Europe to extremes of liberty and fear before. The question is whether we will respond in the same way or restrain our "craving for totality" (Stanley Cavell).

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Mar 10, 2014
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China-Japan Relations and the Role of the U.S.
China’s relationship with Japan has reached a nadir in recent years with the dispute over Diaoyu/Senkaku islands and with Prime Minister Abe’s visit to Yasukuni Shrine in December 2013. Is conflict likely between the two countries? How do we assess Abe’s and Xi’s policies toward each other? What is the implication of worsening China-Japan relations for the U.S.? How do we assess the influence of domestic political and economic changes on Chinese and Japanese foreign policies? This conference brings together 14 experts from China, Japan and the U.S. to find answers to the above questions. They will discuss the history and current state of China-Japan relations and the role of the U.S. in light of the political and economic changes in both countries, against the background of maritime dispute and rising nationalism in Japan and China.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Mar 07, 2014
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Mexico Moving Forward: 20 Years of NAFTA & Beyond
Join us for a daylong symposium to engage with business leaders, policy makers and scholars in discussions on Mexico's progress and future goals 20 years after the signing of NAFTA

Location: Sanford Consortium Auditorium
Event Date: Mar 06, 2014
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Collaboration For Success: Arab-Israeli Relations & Next Generation Technology
Dr. Ayoub founded Metallo Therapy in 2010 with the help of Next Generation Technology (NGT) - a medical and life sciences business incubator funded by the Israeli Chief Scientist's Office and a committe4d group of international investors aimed at advancing the achievements of Arab-Israeli scientists and entrepreneurs. Dr. Ayoub was named by the U.S. Embassy as among the world's leading 20 women scientists in 2012. Metallo Therapy is a ground-breaking start-up immersed in research that introduces metal or gold nano-particles to detect and then weaken malignant tumors during radiation.

Location: Rady School - Rady Sky Pavillion
Event Date: Mar 06, 2014
Photo By Center for U.S.- Mexican Studies
Understanding Return Migration to Mexico: Towards a Comprehensive Policy for the Reintegration of Returning Migrants"
Dr. Miryam Hazan is the Washington Director of Mexicans and Americans Thinking Together (MATT) and a fellow with the Tower Center for Political Studies at the Southern Methodist University. She is the author of numerous blogs, journal articles and book chapters on latino politics, immigration and U.S.-Mexico issues, and is currently working on a book manuscript titled "Mexican Immigrant Politics in America" (Cambridge University Press). An expert on U.S., Mexican and Central American migration policies, and Spanish immigration policies, Dr. Hazan has held research and scholarly positions at Demos, Ideas in Action, the Migration Policy Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers, and the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute at the University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Hazan has media experience across the Americas, including working for six years at El Financiero in Mexico City. Free to attend, registration is required. Lunch provided first come, first serve. Co-sponsored with the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Mar 05, 2014
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Changes in Global Manufacturing
The China-U.S. Economic Forum on global economic transformation is an annual event organized by the Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China and the 21st Century China Program, and jointly hosted by Fudan University's Fudan Development Institute in China and IR/PS in the United States. Confirmed Participants: • Sun Lijian, Professor/Associate Dean, School of Economics, Fudan University • Yin Xingmin, Professor/Director, Center for China Economy, Fudan University • Luo Changyuan, Professor, Research Center for World Economy • Lin Shu, Professor, Comprehensive Research Institute, Fudan University • Zhu Hongfei, Research Fellow, 985 National Research Base on International Competitive Force

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Feb 28, 2014
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Toward Global Coordination of Monetary Policy
Speakers: Masaaki Shirakawa, former Bank of Japan Governor, and Gordon Hanson, EmPac Director and Professor of Economics

Location: Sanford Consortium, Auditorium
Event Date: Feb 20, 2014
Photo By IRC
Beginning Again: Refugees, San Diego and the Politics of Resettlement
You are invited to join the International Rescue Committee on February 20, 2014 at 7PM at The Great Hall. Come learn about the large refugee community here in San Diego County and how the International Rescue Committee is working to help them assimilate into American life through practical assistance. Speakers will share their unique stories of their involvement with the IRC and how you can personally get involved. Sambusas catered by RED

Location: Great Hall
Event Date: Feb 20, 2014
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Josefina Vázquez Mota, "El sueño que unió la frontera"
We are proud to host Josefina Vázquez Mota, arguably the most prominent woman in Mexican politics, the evening of Feb. 19 for a discussion of her latest book el El Sueño Que Unió La Frontera. An economist, businesswoman, journalist and author, Vázquez Mota has held multiple ministerial positions in Mexico and was the PAN candidate for president in the 2012 elections. Her most recent publication is the culmination of scores of interviews with the Mexican diaspora in the United States about their professional lives and pursuit of the American Dream. From doctors to scientists, from DREAMers to day laborers, Vázquez Mota captures the nuanced relationship that her countrymen have with the border, the opportunities they find in the U.S. and the lives they leave behind in Mexico. A cocktail reception will follow the presentation and book signing. This program will take place in Spanish. Regrettably, no interpretation is available at this time.

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Feb 19, 2014
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U.S. High Skilled Immigration: Problems, Misconceptions, and Solutions
Join Ron Hira & discussant Peter Gourevitch as they discuss reform of U.S. immigration policy, on the congressional agenda for the first time since 2007.While the most contentious elements of the policy debate surround the 11 million undocumented living in the U.S., the policy proposals for re-shaping high skilled immigration are also controversial. This talk will cover the perceived problems with current high skilled immigration policy. It will also explore common misconceptions that distort the public discussion. High skilled immigration is a source of vibrancy for the U.S., especially in technology and research sectors, so getting the policies correct is of great importance to the nation’s innovation system.Using new government data, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, Dr. Hira will present a clearer picture about how high-skill guest worker visas, such as the H-1B, and legal permanent residence visas are actually used.

Location: ERC Conference room 115
Event Date: Feb 19, 2014
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Back to Dudelsheim: Conquering the Fatherland – with Larry Greenbaum
A native of Dudelsheim, Hesse-Darmstadt, Larry Greenbaum was one of only four Jews to emigrate to the United States after Kristallnacht, the pogrom that marked the beginning of the end for Germany’s Jews. Seven years after emigration, Greenbaum returned to Germany, this time as a member of the invading Allies. The Allied advance brought him back to Dudelsheim, his old home town. At this presentation, Greenbaum recalls what it meant to grow up Jewish in Nazi Germany, his experience as a refugee in the United States, and his memorable return to his own home. He will be interviewed by Anne-Clara Schenderlein, a doctoral candidate in modern German history, with an emphasis on Jewish emigration.

Location: Geisel Library, Seuss room
Event Date: Feb 19, 2014
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Wealth and Power: China's Long March to the 21st Century
Professor Orville Schell will discuss just where China now finds itself at this critical economic and political inflection point as its new leaders head into their second year. What does their leadership style bode for U.S.-China relations and China's efforts to find a new place in the world? Professor Schell graduated Magna Cum Laude from Harvard University in Far Eastern History, was an exchange student at National Taiwan University in the 1960s. He is a former professor and Dean at the University of California, Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. Schell is the author of 14 books, nine of them about China, and a contributor to numerous edited volumes.

Location: UC San Diego, Faculty Club, Atkinson Pavilion
Event Date: Feb 13, 2014
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Webinar: Venezuela’s Energy Outlook at the Maduro Administration’s One Year Mark
Almost one year since the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and election of Nicolás Maduro, questions continue to swirl around where the country's energy sector is heading and particularly at national oil company PDVSA. Venezuela remains Latin America’s largest oil producer and exporter, but production has been trending downward and the Maduro Administration has so far been unable to reverse the backsliding trend. Meanwhile, high hopes for joint ventures with foreign companies to boost production in the Orinoco belt have been dampened by project delays, leaving many analysts less than optimistic about a turnaround in Venezuela’s oil fortunes, at least in the short term.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Feb 12, 2014
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"War! What Is It Good For? Violence And Civilization, From Primates To Robots"
Stone Age people stood a 1 in 10 or even a 1 in 5 chance of dying violently, but in the 20th century--despite two world wars, the use of nuclear weapons, and multiple genocides--the risk of violent death had fallen to between 1 in 50 and 1 in 100. The explanation is both shocking and uncomfortable: War, and war alone, has created bigger, more complex societies, ruled by governments that have stamped out internal violence. The greatest paradox in human history is that killing has made the world safer, and this safety has allowed people to make the world richer too. The patterns of the last 15,000 years suggest that the 21st century will be the most dangerous in history--but once we understand what war has been good for, we can begin to see where it will take us next. Ian Morris is Willard Professor of Classics and Archaeology at Stanford University. He has directed excavations in Italy and Greece, written six books and edited six more, and served at Stanford as Chair of Classics, Director of the Archaeology Center, and Senior Associate Dean of Humanities and Sciences. He is currently a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and his next book, War! What is it Good For? Violence and the Progress of Civilization, from Primates to Robots will be published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in April 2014. Sponsored by IICAS, the European Studies Program, Nicholas Family Endowed Chair in Modern Greek History and The State in Transformation/Center for Humanities Group.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Feb 11, 2014
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Suing Polluters in China
In a country known for tight political control and ineffectual courts, this talk will explore how environmental litigation works: how judges make decisions, why lawyers take cases and how plaintiffs win allies. The main theme is how the leadership’s mixed signals and political ambivalence play out on the ground, propelling some – such as the village doctor who fought a chemical plant for over a decade – as others back away from risk. Yet even in a country where expectations would be that law wouldn’t much matter, environmental litigation provides a sliver of space for legal professionals to explore new roles and, in so doing, probe the boundary of what is politically possible. Stern is an assistant professor of Law and Political Science at University of California, Berkeley. Her research explores the relationship between law, power, social change and globalization, particularly in Mainland China and Hong Kong. Her recent work focuses on the role courts play in authoritarian states as well as the political dynamics surrounding environmental regulation and activism in China.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Robinson Building Complex, room 3201
Event Date: Feb 10, 2014
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Understanding the Current Situation in North Korea


Location: Great Hall, I House
Event Date: Feb 10, 2014
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Project on International Affairs (PIA) International Relations Speaker Series: Julia Grey, U Penn
Julia Gray is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in international relations with a focus on international political economy. She received her PhD in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles, an MSc with distinction in International Political Economy from the London School of Economic, and a BA summa cum laude from Amherst College. Her research centers on the effects of international economic relations and economic organizations in emerging markets. Her work in international political economy and international organization has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Journal of Political Science, International Studies Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, the European Journal of Political Research, and the Review of International Organizations. Her book The Company You Keep: International Organization and Sovereign Risk in Emerging Markets is currently under contract at Cambridge University Press.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Feb 06, 2014
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From the Watergate Scandal to the Compliance Revolution: The Fight Against Corporate Corruption in the United States and Germany, 1972-2012"
Hartmut Berghoff is an economic and social historian. He has held research and teaching posts at University of Bielefeld, the University of Tübingen, Humboldt University Berlin, Beisheim Graduate School of Management Koblenz, and Harvard Business School. He is on leave from the directorship of the Institute of Economic and Social History at the University of Göttingen and became Director of the German Historical Institute in Washington D.C. in April 2008. He is currently working on the history of consumption in Nazi Germany.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Feb 05, 2014
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EmPac Fellow: Dr. Charles Zhang
Dr. Charles Zhang is the founder, board chair and CEO of Sohu. Prior to founding Sohu, Dr. Zhang worked for Internet Securities Inc. (ISI) and helped establish its China operations, and was Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) liaison officer with China. Dr. Zhang has a Ph.D. in experimental physics from MIT and a bachelor of science degree from Qinghua University in Beijing. In 1998, Dr. Zhang was named by Time Digital as one of the world's top 50 digital elite. He has also been recognized by the World Economic Forum as a Global Leader of Tomorrow and one of 25 global E-biz CEOs by BusinessWeek. Dr. Zhang co-led an executive delegation to support Beijing's successful 2008 Olympic bid at the 112th International Olympic Committee in Moscow. Additionally, he led Sohu's efforts in winning the Internet Content Service Sponsorship role for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall
Event Date: Feb 04, 2014
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IICAS European Lecture Series: "Crossing East and West: Divergence and Interdependence in the History of Europe"
Geoffrey Eley is a British-born historian of Germany. He studied history at the Balliol College of Oxford University and received his D.Phil from the University of Sussex in 1974. He has taught at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor since 1979 as professor of history and, since 1997, of German Studies, and now serves as the Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History. Eley's early work focused on the radical nationalism in Imperial Germany, but has since grown to include theoretical and methodological reflections on historiography and the history of the political left in Europe. Eley is particularly well known for his early study, The Peculiarities of German History (first published in German as Mythen deutscher Geschichtsschreibung in 1984), co-authored with David Blackbourn, which challenged the new orthodoxy in German social history known as the Sonderweg thesis. However, his most successful book is Forging Democracy: The History of the Left in Europe, 1850-2000, which has been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, Serbian, Korean, Turkish and Greek.

Location: Galbraith Conference Room, H&SS Room 4025
Event Date: Jan 31, 2014
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Fifth Annual University of California Conference on International Migration - CCIS
Fifth Annual University of California Conference on International Migration: Immigrant Integration in Comparative Perspective

Location: The Great Hall
Event Date: Jan 31, 2014
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Project on International Affairs (PIA) International Relations Speaker Series: Andrew Coe, USC
The Project on International Affairs (PIA) Seminar Series brings outside speakers to UC San Diego to discuss their research in the field of international relations. These seminars are intended for faculty members and graduate students but are open to all interested members of the academic community and the general public. The calendar is updated frequently, so please check back on this web page for the most current information on upcoming PIA speakers and other special events. The Project on International Affairs (PIA) at the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies (IICAS), and the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation (ILAR) at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS), are pleased to present the fifth annual International Relations Speaker Series. Combining PIA and ILAR efforts, the series features speakers discussing research in the field of international relations, and a wide array of issues, from environment and energy to human rights, and trade and security.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Jan 30, 2014
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Project on International Affairs (PIA) International Relations Speaker Series:"Nuclear Russian Roulette: A Model of Proliferation and Preventive War"
Andrew Coe develops a formal model of bargaining between two states, where one can invest in developing nuclear weapons and the other imperfectly observes its efforts and progress over time, and uses it to analyze the occurrence of proliferation and war and the role of intelligence-gathering and estimates in these. Surprise proliferation, sporadic crises over the uncertain progress of a proliferant's efforts, and "mistaken" preventive wars can all arise endogenously in the model. The costs of war, effects of proliferation, and technological sophistication of the proliferant influence the probabilities of war and proliferation in ways that are often counter-intuitive and non-monotonic. However, much of the variation in behavior is driven, not by these potentially policy-manipulable factors, but by chance elements such as when the proliferant's program will make progress and when the other state will discover this. In the absence of a non-proliferation agreement, the United States and proliferants like Iran are playing what amounts to a long game of Russian roulette. Andrew Coe is Assistant Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California and an adjunct at the Institute for Defense Analyses. He received his PhD in political science from Harvard University in 2012, and for 2012-13 was a Stanton Foundation Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Jan 30, 2014
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The Human Consequences of Totalitarianism
The event will be a conversation with Adam Johnson regarding his 2012 novel, "The Orphan Master's Son" about life in North Korea, that received the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in fiction. Johnson is Associate Professor of English with emphasis in creative writing at Stanford University. His work has appeared in Esquire, Harper's, Playboy, GQ, Paris Review, Granta, Tin House, The New York Times and Best American Short Stories. He is the author of "Emporium," a short-story collection, and the novel "Parasites Like Us." His books have been translated into twenty-three languages. Johnson was a 2010 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow and is a Guggenheim Fellowship for 2013-14. About the book: Pak Jun Do is the haunted son of a lost mother—a singer “stolen” to Pyongyang—and an influential father who runs a work camp for orphans. He becomes a professional kidnapper who must navigate the shifting rules, arbitrary violence, and baffling demands of his Korean overlords in order to stay alive. Driven to the absolute limit of what any human being could endure, he boldly takes on the treacherous role of rival to Kim Jong Il in an attempt to save the woman he loves.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Hojel Hall
Event Date: Jan 30, 2014
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IICAS European Lecture Series: "The Black Legend on the Nile: French Colonial Ideology During Napoleon's Occupation of Egypt
IICAS launched the European Studies Initiative in 2002 to build a focal point for faculty, students, and members of the San Diego community who share an interest in contemporary Europe. The central aim was the construction of a European Studies program, and led to the launch of the European Studies Minor at UCSD.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Jan 28, 2014
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Wu Jinglian: Voice of Reform in China
Come and hear Professor Barry Naughton and famed Chinese economist Wu Jinglian to talk about their just-released book "Wu Jinglian: Voice of Reform in China" and about China’s reform. Published by MIT press in 2013, the book includes Wu Jingnian's most important writings on the Chinese reform, accompanied by insightful introductions by Barry Naughton. This is how Naughton introduced him in the beginning of the book: "For more than thirty years, Wu Jinglian has been widely regarded as China's most celebrated and influential economist. In the late 1970s, Wu (b. 1930) was one of a small group of economic thinkers who broke with Marxist concepts and learned the principles of a market economy. Since then he has been at the center of economic reform in China, moving seamlessly as an "insider outsider" between academic and policy roles. In recent years, Wu has emerged as a prominent public intellectual fighting not just for market reform but also for a democratic society backed by the rule of law.”

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS, Robinson Auditorium
Event Date: Jan 25, 2014
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IICAS International Law Speaker Series: "NAFTA: 20 Years Later"
On January 1, 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the seminal regional trade pact among Canada, Mexico, and the United States, entered into force. On that same day, a group of indigenous peoples in Chiapas began the Zapatista uprising in Mexico, challenging the liberalization that NAFTA represented. NAFTA was designed to integrate the economies of the three countries, and it was expected to have profound implications on security, immigration patterns, and economic growth. To the concern of its critics, NAFTA has now become the template for future regional and bilateral free trade agreements. Twenty years later, NAFTA has changed the face of trade in the Americas. While it has promoted economic liberalization, NAFTA has also contributed to unprecedented social dislocation in Mexico and the United States. The 11th annual joint speakers series, co-sponsored by the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies (IICAS) at University of California, San Diego and the International Legal Studies Program at California Western School of Law (CWSL), explores the contributions of NAFTA and the challenges it faces in the future.

Location: California Western School of Law (CWSL), Lecture Hall 1
Event Date: Jan 24, 2014
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Crimes Against Humanity What Can the U.S. do about them in Syria and Elsewhere?
Beth van Schaack will discuss the evolution of the United States' approach to international criminal justice from World War I to the present. This process has culminated in our government's commitment to the prevention of atrocity crimes (genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity) and the establishment of the Atrocities Prevention Board. Full implementation remains a challenge, as evidenced by the situation in Syria. “These issues are timely and topical. That’s the number one reason to have this Dean’s Roundtable. We’re living in a world where the U.S. government is in a constant state of asking ourselves questions about interventions, not always for humanitarian purposes, but often times in the guise of doing so. Should we have intervened in Syria or not? This is precisely the area where we need clear lessons from history about how to approach future crises.” -Emilie Hafner-Burton

Location: UC San Diego, Faculty Club, Atkinson Pavilion
Event Date: Jan 24, 2014
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UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Malamud Room at the Weaver Center
The purpose of this multi-panel, daylong conference is to study the massive relocation of indigenous populations by the Spanish crown at the end of the 16th and beginning of the 17th centuries, generally known as the reducciones or congregaciones de Indios in the Americas. This conference will bring together a multidisciplinary group of archaeologists, historians, art historians, demographers and political scientists to discuss new theoretical approaches and methodological tools that can be brought to bear on the study of one of the most significant events for the surviving indigenous population in the colonial era. Most of the discussion will geographically focus on South-Central Mexico. Conference participants will offer papers that reflect on the themes of epidemics and demographic collapse, ethnic violence and resistance, territorial and urban reorganizations, Colonial politics and intrigue, and the ongoing relevance to the living descendents in contemporary Mexico.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Malamud Room at the Weaver Center
Event Date: Jan 23, 2014
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Changing Dynamics in East Asia and Korean Politics
Mr. Sohn has been an activist in the Korean democratic movement beginning as a student and as a university professor at Inha and Sogang universities. His political career started in 1993 when he joined the National Assembly, where he was elected four times. In 1996, he became the youngest Minister of Public Health and Welfare under then-President Kim Young-sam and has ran twice for his party's presidential nomination.

Location: Sanford Consortium Auditorium
Event Date: Jan 22, 2014
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Power and its Use in Chinese Foreign Policy
Professor CHEN Zhimin, Dean, School of International Relations and Public Administration (SIRPA), Fudan University, will deliver a talk to Professor Miles Kahler's class "International Relations of the Asia Pacific." There will be a limited number of seats available to the public so please register today! Dr. CHEN Zhimin is the Dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, a professor of international relations and a Jean Monnet Chair professor of European foreign policy. He serves as member of Advisory Board or editorial committee of several international journals, such as The Hague Journal of Diplomacy and Asia Europe Journal. His research interests include international relations theory, diplomacy studies, Chinese foreign policy and EU studies.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Room 3201
Event Date: Jan 22, 2014
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IICAS Middle East Lecture Series: Performing in the Middle East
The IICAS Middle East Lecture Series brings a diverse group of experts on the Middle East to UC San Diego to discuss their research on the region. These seminars supplement the Middle East Studies Minor, and are intended for UCSD faculty and students, and open to all interested members of the community.

Location: Wagner Theatre
Event Date: Jan 16, 2014
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Is China the Next Mexico?
As the Chinese Communist Party nears the 70-year mark, what can it learn from the experience of the world’s longest-ruling party, Mexico’s PRI? Will China’s leadership be able to overcome the problems of corruption, income inequality, a growing distrust of government and an increasingly vocal citizenry in order to stay in power? Jorge Guajardo, Mexico’s Ambassador to Beijing from 2007 to 2013, will discuss the parallels and differences he observes between his country in the 1980s and 90s and China today, and how studying the last decades of Mexico’s PRI rule might serve to understand the future of the Chinese Communist Party. Guajardo serves as Senior Director at McLarty Associates, where he provides strategic counsel and expertise on Latin America and China. He was Consul General of Mexico to the U.S. in Austin, Texas, and a Mexican Congressional candidate in 2003. Ambassador Guajardo also brings several years of private sector experience working in the Washington, D.C. offices of public relations firms Hill and Knowlton, and later Burson-Marsteller.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Malamud Room at the Weaver Center
Event Date: Jan 16, 2014
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IICAS European Lecture Series: "Worldwide: Global Conflicts, Transformations and Interactions in the Second Half of the 20th Century "
IICAS launched the European Studies Initiative in 2002 to build a focal point for faculty, students, and members of the San Diego community who share an interest in contemporary Europe. The central aim was the construction of a European Studies program, and led to the launch of the European Studies Minor at UCSD.

Location: SSB 107
Event Date: Jan 15, 2014
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IICAS European Lecture Series: "The Unfamiliar Karl Marx"
IICAS launched the European Studies Initiative in 2002 to build a focal point for faculty, students, and members of the San Diego community who share an interest in contemporary Europe. The central aim was the construction of a European Studies program, and led to the launch of the European Studies Minor at UCSD.

Location: Suess Room, Geisel Library
Event Date: Jan 14, 2014
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Cultural Intelligence: Adapting to an Increasingly Global Business Culture
Our lifestyles are becoming more global and our world is increasingly diverse. This rapid evolution brings greater opportunities for growth, yet most of us underestimate the subtle differences in the way people from diverse backgrounds perceive the world—and how greatly this can impact our success in communicating and doing business with them. Developing our cultural intelligence can help us interact more effectively with people from all regions of the globe—characterized by different values, customs, attitudes, behaviors, languages, and time zones. If we can effectively perceive how people think, communicate, and behave in cultures different than our own, we will learn to interact with them more successfully. Through lively, interactive discussions, role-playing, and self-assessment exercises, participants in this course will discover new ways of seeing the world and its people. Using effective tools to interpret the subtle differences between cultures across the globe, participants should walk out of the classroom with an enriched level of cultural intelligence, ready to practice at home and in the workplace.

Location: Rady School of Management
Event Date: Dec 12, 2013
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Cuba Educational and Policy Trip
From December 7th to December 14th, 2013, the Institute will convene a delegation to explore policy in Havana, Cienfuegos and Trinidad. The trip is a week of immersion in Cuban government, business, art, and culture as legally licensed educational travelers. Few in our generation have been inside Cuba, and even fewer have had the inside access now being offered to you by the Institute. The Institute is offering an insider’s perspective to life in Cuba and the Cuba-US relationship. Participants will meet with high-ranking government officials, hear from entrepreneurs in the Cuban private sector, learn from professional Cuban artists and musicians and convene with diplomats and economists. Don’t miss this opportunity to study Cuban policy through the lens of the people and places that make it unique. Visits will be conducted in English or will have interpretation available. Because of the difficulties of arranging visas and the limited number of spaces available, we advise you to secure your spot as soon as possible. A deposit of $1000 is required by September 20th, 2013. Payment in full is required by October 5th.

Location: Cuba
Event Date: Dec 07, 2013 - Dec 07, 2013
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International Cafe: Malaysia
The International Center at UC San Diego invites you to join us in celebrating the various cultures from around the globe. Join us for an authentic international lunch during our weekly celebration at the Friday Café for only $5.00 per person including dessert, drinks and seconds. Listen to traditional music, enjoy a delicious meal, and interact with more than 200 students, scholars and volunteers from around the world.

Location: International Center
Event Date: Dec 06, 2013
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Aviation Technology Transfer: An Analysis of Brazilian Embraerr
Presented by Nelson Altamirano, Associate Professor Lead Sustainability Management and SOBM Online Coordinator School of Business and Management and current Visiting Associate Research Scientist.

Location: Institute of the Americas Deutz Room
Event Date: Dec 05, 2013
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Governance of Public Health in Mexico
In this public talk, Diaz-Cayeros will discuss Mexico's massive transformation of both its political system and its public health system over the last twenty-five years. The simultaneous changes in Mexico provide scholars with the opportunity to undertake ground-breaking research to understand how democratization and public health intersect. This research can inform policy decisions and directly impact improved health outcomes in Mexico and around the world. Dr. Alberto Diaz-Cayeros joined the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies faculty at Stanford University in 2013 after serving for five years as the director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego. Read his biography here.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Dec 04, 2013
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American Values: Migrants, Money and Meaning in El Salvador and the United States
El Salvador has transformed dramatically over the past half-century. Historically reliant on cash crops like coffee and cotton, the country emerged from a civil war in 1992 to find much of its national wealth coming from money sent home by a massive emigrant workforce in the United States. In American Value, David Pedersen examines this new way of life across two places: Intipucá in El Salvador and Washington, DC in the USA. Drawing on Charles S. Peirce to craft a highly innovative semeiotic of value, he critically explains how the apparent worthiness of migrants and their money is shaping a transnational moral world with implications well beyond El Salvador and the USA.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Dec 04, 2013
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Performance Legitimacy, State Autonomy and China’s Economic Miracle
In this public talk, Dr. Zhao will discuss that the success of the Chinese economy relies not just on the Chinese state's economic policy, but also on its social policies. The Chinese state is compelled to make policy shifts quickly because performance constitutes the primary base of its legitimacy, and the Chinese state is able to make policy shifts because it enjoys a high level of autonomy inherited from China's past. China's economic development follows no fixed policies and relies on no stable institutions, and there is no 'China model' or 'Beijing consensus' that can be constructed to explain its success. Dingxin Zhao's research covers the areas of social movements, nationalism, historical sociology and economic development. His interests also extend to micro-sociology, ecological sociology, sociological theory, and methodology.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: Dec 02, 2013
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Energy Reform in Mexico
Dr. Juan E. Pardinas is the CEO of IMCO, the Mexican institute for competitiveness, a non-profit think tank with the aim to irritate political decision makers into taking action that's favorable to Mexican prosperity and development. Juan writes an op-ed column for the Mexican Newspaper Reforma and has been a correspondent for CNN en Español in India and Japan. Read his biography here. Free to attend, but registration is required. This event is co-sponsored by the IR/PS Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies.

Location: UC San Diego, Faculty Club
Event Date: Nov 21, 2013
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The Buddhas of Mes Aynak
Close to a small village called Mes Aynak, Afghanistan, one of the most stunning sites of world history is about to be destroyed. This documentary tells the story of that site, where a team of archeologists struggles to preserve whatever they can of a Buddhist history we may never know. Movie screening will be followed by a panel discussion and reception. Presented by Making of the Modern World, and co-sponsored by the Department of Literature, Program for the Study of Religion, IR/PS and IICAS.

Location: International House, Great Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: Nov 20, 2013
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The German Bundestag Election of 2013
William Chandler’s research has concentrated on comparative political analysis, with special interests in Canadian, German, French and Italian governments and the European Union. His publications include Public Policy and Provincial Politics (1979), Federalism and the Role of the State (1987) and Challenges to Federalism: Policy-Making in Canada and the Federal Republic of Germany (1989), plus numerous journal articles and book chapters on party government, Christian Democracy, party system change, European integration and immigration policy. He is a member of the editorial advisory boards of German Politics and The Journal of European Integration and has previously served as guest professor in Germany, at Tübingen and Oldenburg Universities. From 2001-03, he served as Research Director for the Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, University of California, and from 2002-04 as President of the Conference Group on German Politics, the national association of German specialists in political science. During 2004, he wrote on the U.S. presidential election and was on leave in Paris, focusing on Europe's New Populism. In 2013, Chandler served as an election observer in Berlin. A professor of political science at UC San Diego since 1997, Chandler completed his undergraduate education at Cornell University, and earned his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Location: SSB 107
Event Date: Nov 19, 2013
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Leadership in the Americas Award: His Excellency Felipe de Jesús Calderón Hinojosa
Felipe Calderón, immediate past President of Mexico, will receive The Institute of the Americas’ award for Leadership in the Americas. During his 2006-2012 term in office, President Calderón dealt with the world economic crisis and its impact on Mexico and confronted drug-related violence in Mexico. President Calderón is a Global Public Leaders Fellow at the Kennedy School at Harvard University and is heading the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. As President, Calderón hosted the 2010 Cancun Summit on Climate Change and pushed through Mexico’s first climate change law. President Calderón will be accompanied by his wife former First Lady Margarita Zavala. The Leadership in the Americas Award recognizes outstanding contributions to economic and social reforms in the Americas, and has been awarded previously to 12 heads of state.

Location: TBD
Event Date: Nov 18, 2013 - Nov 18, 2013
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Dissent and Revolution in the Digital Age: Social Media, Blogging and Activism in Eygpt
David Faris is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Roosevelt University, Chicago. In addition to his post in the Political Science & Public Administration department, he is the director of Roosevelt’s interdisciplinary International Studies Program. Farris earned his PhD in Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia in 2010. His book, Dissent and Revolution in a Digital Age: Social Media, Blogging and Activism in Egypt, published in 2013, focuses on the use of digital media by Egyptian opposition move-ments. His academic work has been published in Middle East Policy, Arab Media & Society and Politique Etrangèr, and he has published op-eds with NPR.org, the Christian Science Monitor, the Daily News Egypt, the Philadelphia Citypaper, the Philadelphia Inquirer and more.

Location: Literature Building Room 155 (de Certeau Room)
Event Date: Nov 18, 2013
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Around the World in Wines
You don’t want to miss this Happy Hour! Great wine + Great friends = Great times! Join us for a tasting of wines from around the world and light hors d'oeuvres. For those of you who studied abroad, this is your chance to visit the International Center.

Location: International Center
Event Date: Nov 15, 2013
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China's Prospect for Growth and RMB Internationalization
Two renowned economists from China will tackle important challenges facing China's economic future. Professor Weisen LI from Fudan University will share his insight on the recent economic slowdown in China and what it portends for the second largest economy in the world. Is the slowing down a short-time phenomenon or a general trend? Dr. YU Yongding will take up the issue of RMB internationalization. As China's intensifies its efforts to internationalize its currency, progress will depend increasingly on the specific nature of Chinese firms, industrial organizations, business models, types of products traded and bargaining power of Chinese firms. How will China move forward? This is a public talk. Q&A session will follow after their presentations. Speaker Bios: Weisen LI holds a BA in Economics in Shandong University, an MA of the ANU and PhD in Economics of the University of Sydney. Professor Li has wide research interests including institutional economics, comparative institutional analysis, language of economics, ethics, anthropology, jurisprudence and history of legal system, Austrian economics particularly thoughts of Hayek. A distinguished Chinese economist, YU Yongding is one of China’s leading authorities on China’s macroeconomic and international monetary issues, and is consulted regularly on matters pertaining to world capital markets and China’s Central Bank. He has served as a member of the Monetary Policy Committee of the People's Bank of China, as well as the Advisory Committee of National Planning of the Commission of National Development and Reform of the PRC.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: Nov 14, 2013
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MINING, ELECTRIC POWER AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHILE AND PERU
Grab your lunch and join us for this joint Institute of the Americas & CILAS brown bag panel discussion with David Mares, Director of CILAS & Professor of Political Science at UCSD and Baker Scholar in Energy Studies at the James A. Baker III Institute of Public Policy at Rice University, and Jeremy Martin, Energy Program Director at the Institute of the Americas. Both Chile and Peru have enjoyed strong economic growth in the last several years, in part fueled by the booming mining sector. Yet economic success has brought with it a commensurate rise in energy demand, a challenge both countries have struggled to meet. In Chile, environmental opposition to large-scale projects has become an issue of national political importance, and is likely to remain so as the country holds presidential elections November 17. Peru is in a similarly precarious position as it seeks to promote sustainable growth with social inclusion, much of which is driven by mining. Yet unlike Chile – which has limited traditional energy resources of its own – Peru has abundant hydrocarbon reserves. Instead, community opposition and institutional permitting delays mean Peru will struggle to meet rising electricity demand. In both cases, electricity shortages threaten not only the mining sector but long term economic growth.

Location: Deutz Room in the Copley International Conference Center – Institute of the Americas Complex
Event Date: Nov 14, 2013
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Film Screening of Presunto Culpable
This award-winning documentary exposes the unsettling reality of a life behind bars in Mexico City and the inhumane process that leads to it. Free to attend, but registration is required. Movie snacks will be served.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Nov 13, 2013
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Reforming Mexico's Penitentiaries
Following the film screening of Presumed Guilty, a talk will be presented the reality of Mexican jails and questions their purpose and utility in their current state of operations. The precarious state of Mexican prisons forces us to ask if they are fulfilling their goals and if it is convenient that incarceration remains the primary form of punishment for practically every crime committed in Mexico.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: Nov 13, 2013
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BLACKness Around the World
Kundum, Negra, Moreno - Have you ever thought about how the African Diaspora is viewed in countries other than the United States of America? Come and hear first-hand from students who travelled abroad. They will share their experiences and pique your interests about programs abroad. Lunch will be provided.

Location: Black Resource Center (2nd Floor Old Student Center)
Event Date: Nov 13, 2013
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STEMM Women Going Global
Given the increasingly global marketplace and likely benefits from facilitating the connection and collaboration of women in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine) around the world, Graduate Women in Science and Engineering (GradWISE) and The Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies Women Going Global (IR/PS WGG) are presenting an event to highlight the broad range of international opportunities for women in STEMM, offer guidance on how to prepare for related challenges, and show how several successful STEMM women were able to utilize their skills and expertise in various international settings. Light refreshments will be served at this moderated panel discussion and networking reception.

Location: International Center Lounge
Event Date: Nov 13, 2013
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A Talk on the 100,000 Strong in the Americas and the New Bilateral Forum on Higher Education with the State Department
Join the International Affairs Group and the U.S. State Department to learn more about the 100,000 Strong in the Americans and the New Bilateral Forum on Higher Education Nov. 13th, 2013 5:30pm at the Great Hall. In March 2011, President Barack Obama launched "100,000 Strong in the Americas," an initiative to increase international study in the Western Hemisphere. The purpose of 100,000 Strong is to foster region-wide prosperity through greater international exchange of students, who are our future leaders and innovators. Increasing understanding in the Western Hemisphere and building closer people-to-people ties will help the State Department work together with the people of the Western Hemisphere to address common challenges including citizen security, economic opportunity, social inclusion, and environmental sustainability. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by International House.

Location: I House Great Hall
Event Date: Nov 13, 2013
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WEBINAR: BP NORTH AMERICA ENERGY OUTLOOK 2030
In the last five years, unconventional resource development has dramatically changed North America’s energy outlook. In particular, the shale gas revolution in the United States has transformed the country’s production outlook in a way that is already impacting global energy markets. Join us for a discussion of North America’s energy outlook for the next two decades with Mark Finley, General Manager of Global Energy Markets & US Economics at BP America. Finley will present BP’s analysis of the trends affecting production and demand across North America, as well as global implications of North America’s rise as global energy player. Finley’s presentation will be followed by an interactive discussion with the audience. The BP Energy Outlook 2030 highlights the growing role of developing economies in global energy consumption, and the increasing share of non-fossil fuels in global energy supply. It emphasizes the importance of both improving energy efficiency and expanding energy supplies to meet the energy needs of billions of people who aspire to better lifestyles, and doing so in a way that is sustainable and secure. This year’s edition has a special focus on the role of shale gas and tight oil in supporting the growth of natural gas and oil supply. More detail can be found at www.bp.com/energyoutlook.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Nov 12, 2013
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WEBINAR: BP NORTH AMERICA ENERGY OUTLOOK 2030
In the last five years, unconventional resource development has dramatically changed North America’s energy outlook. In particular, the shale gas revolution in the United States has transformed the country’s production outlook in a way that is already impacting global energy markets. Join us for a discussion of North America’s energy outlook for the next two decades with Mark Finley, General Manager of Global Energy Markets & US Economics at BP America. Finley will present BP’s analysis of the trends affecting production and demand across North America, as well as global implications of North America’s rise as global energy player. Finley’s presentation will be followed by an interactive discussion with the audience. The BP Energy Outlook 2030 highlights the growing role of developing economies in global energy consumption, and the increasing share of non-fossil fuels in global energy supply. It emphasizes the importance of both improving energy efficiency and expanding energy supplies to meet the energy needs of billions of people who aspire to better lifestyles, and doing so in a way that is sustainable and secure. This year’s edition has a special focus on the role of shale gas and tight oil in supporting the growth of natural gas and oil supply. More detail can be found at www.bp.com/energyoutlook.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Nov 12, 2013
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Education Reform in Mexico
Dr. Marco Fernandez from Mexico City-based think tank Mexico Evalua will discuss the state of education reform in Mexico today. Co-sponsored by Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies and International House.

Location: Great Hall @I House
Event Date: Nov 12, 2013
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Protecting the Vulnerable
In this roundtable discussion, Ms. Guo Jianmei will discuss China’s rapidly growing civil society sector and the differences it can make in the lives of women, youth and others around the country. Guo is one of China’s preeminent public interest lawyer and has fought for women’s rights in China for more than 17 years. Read her biography here.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS, Room 3202
Event Date: Nov 07, 2013
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Macroeconomic Challenges in Latin America to 2020
In his public talk, Dr. Vial will discuss the issues created by demographic transitions, dependence on commodity exports and the challenges for macroeconomic policy in the region. Joaquín Vial is a member of the Board of the Central Bank of Chile and was appointed in 2012. He holds a Bachelor’s degree, has a Master’s degree in economics from the Universidad de Chile and a PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania (1988). Before his appointment, Vial was with the Research Department of Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria, BBVA, where he was Head Economist for South America (2008-2011), Head of Global Trends Unit (2006-2008) and Head Economist for Chile (2004-2006).

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall
Event Date: Nov 06, 2013
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Dia de los Muertos Celebration
On November 1, the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies will be celebrating Día de los Muertos at the Institute of the Americas Plaza. Join us for altars, pan de muerto, Mexican hot chocolate, ballet folkloric and mariachi! The Day of the Dead (El Día de los Muertos or All Souls' Day) is a holiday celebrated in Mexico and by Latin America. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for, and remember, friends and family members who have died. Traditions include building private altars honoring the deceased, using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts.

Location: Institute of the Americas Plaza
Event Date: Nov 01, 2013
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Strategic Stability in Northeast Asia
In this public talk, Roberts will discuss the changing security environment that has created interest in Northeast Asia in the role of U.S. extended deterrence and the requirements of strategic stability in the 21st century. The Obama administration is pursuing a three-part strategy to: (1) comprehensively strengthen the regional deterrence architecture, (2) preserve strategic stability with China (and Russia) and (3) cooperate with allies towards these ends. In support of this agenda, cooperation between Japan and the U.S. has developed to advance this strategy. These topics will be addressed in this roundtable discussion. Bradley Roberts has served as special advisor to the STRATCOM Strategic Advisory Group, as vice chairman of the board of the U.S. Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific, as chairman of the research advisory council of the Chemical and Biological Arms Control Institute and as member and founding chairman of the Threat Reduction Program Review Committee of Los Alamos National Laboratories.

Location: UC San Diego, Faculty Club
Event Date: Oct 31, 2013
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Third Annual Herb York Memorial Lecture
Join IGCC for the Third Annual Herb York Memorial Lecture. We are honored to have Dr. Arati Prabhakar, Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), speaking on "Driving Technological Surprise: DARPA's Mission in a Changing World." Dr. Prabhakar has spent her career investing in world-class engineers and scientists to create new technologies and businesses. Her first service to national security started in 1986 when she joined DARPA as a program manager. She initiated and managed programs in advanced semiconductor technology and flexible manufacturing, as well as demonstration projects to insert new semiconductor technologies into military systems. As the founding director of DARPA's Microelectronics Technology Office, she led a team of program managers whose efforts spanned these areas, as well as optoelectronics, infrared imaging and nanoelectronics. Read Dr. Prabhakar's bio on the DARPA website. The Herb York Lecture honors the memory of UC San Diego’s founding chancellor and the myriad contributions he made to the field of international security and arms control. Dr. York, a distinguished nuclear physicist, founded the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) as well as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Defense Research and Engineering Directorate. He was the founding chancellor of UC San Diego and the first director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (1952–1958).

Location: UC San Diego Atkinson Hall Auditorium
Event Date: Oct 30, 2013 - Oct 30, 2013
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China Town Hall: Issues in U.S.-China Relations
The seventh China Town Hall meeting, coordinated by the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations (NCUSCR) on October 28 in over 60 cities throughout China, will open with a live webcast from Washington featuring Madeleine Albright, former secretary of state, who will discuss U.S.-China relations. Secretary Albright's talk will be moderated by NCUSCR president Steve Orlins, and she will respond to questions emailed in from around the country during the Q&A period. China Focus Blog Launch will be introduced between speakers. Secretary Albright's talk will be followed by a public lecture on urbanization in China by Jeremy Wallace, visiting fellow at Yale and assistant professor of political science from Ohio State University. A reception will be held after the talk. Speakers: eMadeleine Albright is the first female secretary of state of the U.S. government. She was awarded a fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars at the Smithsonian following an international competition in which she wrote about the role of the press in political changes in Poland during the early 1980's. She also served as a Senior Fellow in Soviet and Eastern European Affairs at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, conducting research in developments and trends in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Jeremy Wallace (Ph.D., Stanford University, 2009), Assistant Professor, studies the politics of non-democracies, particularly China, as well as urbanization, development, and redistribution. He is working on a book manuscript, Cities and Stability: Urbanization, Migration, and Authoritarian Resilience in China, examining how cities represent serious threats to autocratic regimes and how the Chinese Communist Party has managed its urbanization to maintain its rule.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Auditorium
Event Date: Oct 28, 2013 - Oct 28, 2013
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Anda Union
AnDa Union’s ten singers and instrumentalists from Inner Mongolia describe themselves as music gatherers, digging deep into the Mongol traditions of Genghis Khan’s unified tribes and unearthing forgotten musical histories. The ensemble combines different musical traditions from all over Inner and Outer Mongolia to create a whole new generation of sound, performing on indigenous instruments and in the khoomii, throat-singing, style. AnDa Union’s concerts feature driving, percussive pieces like Ten Thousand Galloping Horses and Grasslands Journey, as well as the clear long notes of urinduu, or long-song. A favorite at the WOMAD world music festival, AnDa Union’s haunting harmonies and vibrant strings will take ArtPower! audiences on a rich musical journey to the furthest edges of China.

Location: Price Center Ballroom East
Event Date: Oct 27, 2013
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Trustpolitik: A Way Forward on the Korean Peninsula?
Since her inauguration, President Park Geun-hye has advanced the idea of “trustpolitik”: a process for re-engaging North Korea. This process saw setbacks in the early part of the year in the wake of the satellite launch and third nuclear test, but relations appeared to improve with the reopening of the Kaesong Industrial Complex. The administration has now issued a new document outlining its Trustpolitik strategy. Given the stalemate in the Six Party Talks, does it offer a way forward on the Korean peninsula?

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Dean's Conference Room
Event Date: Oct 23, 2013 - Oct 23, 2013
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Patang
A poetic journey to Ahmedabad, Patang (The Kite) weaves together the stories of six people transformed by the energy of India’s largest kite festival. Every year a million kites fill the skies of the old city–dueling, soaring, tumbling, and flying high above cascading rooftops and streets overflowing with people. When a successful Delhi businessman takes his daughter on a surprise trip back to his childhood home for the festival, an entire family has to confront its own fractured past and fragile dreams. [Prashant Bhargava, 2012, USA/India, 95 min]

Location: The Loft
Event Date: Oct 18, 2013 - Oct 18, 2013
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Chinese Globalization: Characteristics, Trends, and Impacts
In this public talk, Dr. SUN will be examining globalization at the individual level. He will focus on globalization in terms of characteristic, basic trend and how it impacts Chinese residents' behaviors, lifestyle and value orientation as well as the consequence of local transformation. Dr. SUN has a PhD in Sociology from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is a professor in the Department of Sociology at the School of Social Development and Public Policy at Fudan University. His research areas include globalization, urban study, civil society, youth problem and consumption culture. He has written several books and more than sixty papers in both English and Chinese. Dr. SUN taught at Fudan University for eleven years before leaving for the U.S. in 1997. He received a tenured faculty position in Texas A&M University-Commerce, USA, in 2011.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: Oct 17, 2013 - Oct 17, 2013
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U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia to Present Public Lecture
Please join us for a public lecture presented by Ambassador Cameron Hume, the U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia. Ambassador Hume will address the challenges facing Indonesia and its relationship with the United States. A question-and-answer session will follow the lecture. Afterward, students and community are invited to enjoy refreshments and to talk informally with Ambassador Hume. Ambassador Hume is a member of the Foreign Service, rank of Career Minister. His earlier assignments included Italy, Tunisia, Syria, Lebanon, the United Nations, and the Holy See. More recently he has served as Ambassador to Algeria and to South Africa, and as Chargé d'Affaires to Sudan. Hume has published three books and numerous articles on foreign policy, and he has been a fellow or guest scholar at the Council on Foreign Relations, Harvard University's Center for International Affairs, and the United States Institute for Peace. He is a lawyer and admitted to practice in New York and the District of Columbia. His foreign languages include Arabic, French, and Italian. Ambassador Hume presented his credentials as U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia on August 1, 2007.

Location: Robinson Building Complex, Room 3201
Event Date: Oct 14, 2013 - Oct 14, 2013
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China and the Future of Global Manufacturing
In his public talk, Mr. Fallows will talk about the economic, political, and technological trends in China, in the United States, and elsewhere that are shaping the prospects for the next wave of innovation, corporate success, and the growth of manufacturing jobs around the world. Former Presidential speechwriter and current national correspondent for The Atlantic, Fallows has reported from around the world for more than 30 years, including most recently three years in China. He has won both the National Book Award and the National Magazine Award plus a NY Emmy award. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio, has appeared frequently on TV, from the Charlie Rose Show to the Colbert Report, has worked on a software design team at Microsoft, and was a visiting professor at the University of Sydney in Australia. His latest book, "China Airborne," was released by Pantheon in May, 2012. His recent books include "Postcards from Tomorrow Square: Reports from China," "Breaking the News: How the Media Undermine American Democracy," and "Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq." Fallows is a licensed small plane pilot. He and his wife, Deborah Fallows, are now embarked on a “road trip by air” around the country, which is called American Futures.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall
Event Date: Oct 08, 2013 - Oct 08, 2013
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Cultural Intelligence
Our lifestyles are becoming more global and our world is increasingly diverse. This rapid evolution brings greater opportunities for growth, yet most of us underestimate the subtle differences in the way people from diverse backgrounds perceive the world – and how greatly this can impact our success in communicating and doing business with them. Developing our cultural intelligence can help us interact more effectively with people from all regions of the globe – characterized by different values, customs, attitudes, behaviors, languages, and time zones. If we can effectively perceive how people think, communicate, and behave in cultures different than our own, we will learn to interact with them more successfully. Through lively, interactive discussions, role-playing, and self-assessment exercises, participants in this course will discover new ways of seeing the world and its people. Using effective tools to interpret the subtle differences between cultures across the globe, participants should walk out of the classroom with an enriched level of cultural intelligence, ready to practice at home and in the workplace.

Location: Rady School of Management
Event Date: Oct 08, 2013 - Oct 08, 2013
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"Five Things Everyone Should Know About the Syrian Civil War"
Five eminent civil war experts will help you understand what is happening in Syria today. Why did war break out in Syria but not in Egypt? And why did the U.S. choose not to intervene? How is this war likely to end and what should the U.S. do in the meantime? These are just some of the questions that will be addressed. Chair: Barbara Walter, Professor of Political Science Panelists: Eli Berman, Professor of Economics Jesse Driscoll, Assistant Professor of Political Science Stephan Haggard, Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies Miles Kahler, Rohr Professor of Pacific International Relations

Location: IR/PS Robinson Auditorium
Event Date: Oct 02, 2013 - Oct 02, 2013
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Fukushima and the Politics of Japan’s Energy and Innovation Policy
In this public talk, Dr. Kiyoshi Kurokawa will discuss the ongoing politics of Japan's energy and innovation policy in relation to his role with Fukushima. He will further reveal his part in the independent investigation of the 2011 disaster. Dr. Kurokawa, MD, is Professor Emeritus of the University of Tokyo, Former President of the Science Council of Japan, Chairman of the Health and Global Policy Institute, and Academic Fellow of National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.

Location: Sanford Consortium, Auditorium
Event Date: Sep 20, 2013 - Sep 20, 2013
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Gangs, Youth and Demand Reduction: Protecting High-Risk Teens from Organized Crime
This workshop focuses on the correlation between the use of controlled substances, youth violence and gang activity, as well as the impact of the sales of narcotics in supporting criminal gang operations. During the week-long program, law enforcement officials, educators, treatment professionals, community leaders and journalists will study programs designed to reduce demand and keep youths from entering the criminal world. Participants will learn how gangs and cartels recruit and hold teenagers, as well as successful approaches in terms of education, community action and government support to keep adolescents from becoming lured into the world of organized crime.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Sep 09, 2013 - Sep 09, 2013
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Conversations with Ambassador Lisa Kubiske
The Institute of the Americas is honored to host an evening with Ambassador Lisa Kubiske, the United States Ambassador to Honduras. Join us for a conversation focusing on Amb. Kubiske’s experience in Honduras, security issues in Central America’s North Triangle, the fight against gangs and the implications of the drug trade on the region’s stability. This is a must attend event for those interested in international relations and diplomacy. Ambassador Kubiske’s diplomatic career has taken her to posts in the Dominican Republican, China, Mexico, Brazil, and elsewhere. Much of her work has focused on promoting international trade – she was recently awarded a Superior Honor award for her participation in the public outreach campaign on behalf of the United States-Peru Free Trade Agreement. Her work has also centered on science and agriculture, and she was instrumental in efforts toward U.S.-Brazil biofuels cooperation. Ambassador Kubiske received the State Department’s highest honor, a Valor Award. She holds a Bachelor's Degree from Brandeis University and a Masters of Science in Foreign Service degree from Georgetown University.

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas Complex
Event Date: Sep 09, 2013 - Sep 09, 2013
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ArtPower! Presents: Ólafur Arnalds
Young Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds creates shadowy, wistful chamber music layered with delicate pop harmonies and ambient effects. A whole new universe of sound inspired by his homeland's expansive, glacial imagery awaits.

Location: The Loft
Event Date: Sep 02, 2013 - Sep 02, 2013
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Tijuana, Baja and Beyond – Flavors of the Americas
• Concert by Madame Ur y sus Hombres* (cabaret-jazz vocalist) • Impromptu Dance Performances by: AIRE FLAMENCO dancer Norma Michel accompanied by guitarist Hiram Gutierrez; Tango dancers Miguel Angel Reynaga and Sandra Martinez; and, Cuban Danzón dance performance. • Baja Med hors d'oeuvres from Jorge Javier Plascencia's Romesco Restaurant; • Tasting of 6 Baja wineries including Santo Tomas winery; • Beer from Cerveza Tijuana; • Danesi coffee service by Italia Expresso Systems; and, • Art exhibit of paintings and photographs by 12 fabulous artists (silent auction).

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Aug 24, 2013 - Aug 24, 2013
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Energy Reform in Mexico 2013
Discussion of energy reform has come to dominate Mexico’s political landscape in recent weeks with much anticipation surrounding the expected submission of President Enrique Peña Nieto’s proposal later this year. Debate over the depth of the reform measures, in particular implications for private sector participation in the country’s oil industry, has intensified with proposals set forth by Mexico’s opposition parties. Faced with vast fiscal constraints, declining oil production and the enormous demand of exploiting complex oil and gas reserves, as well as challenges in the power sector, how Mexico confronts its energy challenges and the extent of reforms sought appear vital for its economic outlook. Join us for a panel discussion of these issues with: • Carlos Rodriguez, Mexico City Bureau Chief, Bloomberg News • Pedro Haas, Principal, McKinsey & Co. • Marcelo Mereles, Partner, EnergeA Structura • Jose M. Larroque, Partner, Baker & McKenzie The panel will be followed by a wine and cheese reception on the plaza at the Institute of the Americas. For those unable to join us in La Jolla, the session will be webcast.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Aug 20, 2013 - Aug 20, 2013
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Webinar: Panama Canal Expansion and Outlook for LNG
The Panama Canal expansion project has attracted much interest across the Western Hemisphere and the globe for its potential to open new trade routes and markets, in particular for liquefied natural gas or LNG. Join us for a discussion with Silvia de Marucci, Head of Bulk Liquids at the Panama Canal Authority, on the implications of the expansion project for the integration of LNG trade both regionally and globally. De Marucci will also discuss the impact of the so-called shale revolution in the United States, which has seen a massive expansion of natural gas production, and the role of the canal expansion in opening new markets for US LNG exports, in particular Asia.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Aug 14, 2013 - Aug 14, 2013
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Tequila Talk: Lessons from Mexico’s Drug War: Can the Peña Nieto Administration Change Course?
Just days after Mexican Marines arrested the brutal leader of the Zetas cartel, Ricardo Ainslie will discuss the challenges that President Enrique Peña Nieto’s administration faces in confronting Mexico’s drug cartels. Ainslie, a native of Mexico City, is a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, a psychoanalyst, a filmmaker, and an author. He completed his undergraduate work at the University of California at Berkeley and his doctoral work at the University of Michigan. Since 2008, his research has focused on the Mexican drug war. He has interviewed many members of former president Felipe Calderón’s security cabinet, as well as American law enforcement, including the DEA, FBI, and Homeland Security. In 2009 and 2010, Ainslie made more than a dozen trips to Ciudad Juárez, the epicenter of Mexico’s drug war at the time, in order to understand the impact of the violence and to study the relationship between the government’s strategy and what was actually taking place on the ground. His recent book, The Fight to Save Juárez: Life in the Heart of Mexico’s Drug War (University of Texas Press, 2013), offers an unprecedented look inside Mexico’s drug war and chronicles the three most violent years in the border city of Ciudad Juarez. A recognized expert, Ainslie gives talks all over the country on a variety of issues related to the Mexican drug war. His op-ed pieces have appeared in a variety of newspapers, including The Washington Post, the Houston Chronicle, and the Austin American Statesman. In April of 2011, Ainslie testified before the U.S. Congress’ Homeland Security Subcommittee Hearing on “The U.S. Homeland Security Role in the Mexican War Against Drug Cartels.”

Location: Malamud Room, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Aug 01, 2013 - Aug 01, 2013
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Technology, Science, and Innovation: A Pathway to Development Executive lunch with Dr. Frances Colón
The Institute of the Americas is delighted to host an executive lunch with Dr. Frances Colón. Dr. Frances Colón is the Deputy Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State at the U.S. Department of State where she promotes Science, Technology and Innovation (ST&I) dialogues; global scientific engagement for capacity-building, development and public diplomacy; S&T fellowships; women in science; and transformational technologies as tools of science diplomacy. The Office of the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary (STAS) provides scientific and technical advice and resources to bureaus and offices at the U.S. Department of State, building upon the Secretary of State’s emphasis on utilizing smart power, economic statecraft, and whole-of-society approaches. The 2010 Department of State Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review stressed that in a world of increasingly fast-paced change, “science and technology must be enlisted in an unprecedented fashion.” Join us for this executive lunch session, which will focus on the important role that The Office of the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary plays in the promotion of scientific and technological initiatives in research institutions and universities. This is a must attend forum for those interested in international relations, science, technology, and diplomacy.

Location: Deutz Room, Institute of the Americas Complex
Event Date: Jul 22, 2013 - Jul 22, 2013
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Summer Science and Innovation Camp
The Institute of the Americas Science and Innovation Summer Camp for Latin American high school students (14-18 years old) will be held July 2013 on the University of California, San Diego campus. The fourth annual Science and Innovation Summer Camp will host up to 30 high school students from countries throughout Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada, and the U.S. who will be selected based on their desire to conduct scientific research on the environment and climate change once they graduate from college. During the two-week residential camp at the Institute of the Americas, students will receive classroom and field instruction from accredited Spanish-speaking community college teachers, with projects designed to help them understand the controversies and test scientific principles in the lab. The camp will also focus on innovation as students create and evaluate scientific and technological responses to climate change. Students will conduct experiments on ocean science, climate change and energy conservation. They will test water samples – which they will bring from their own countries – for arsenic and coliform bacteria. They will build solar cars and investigate advanced informatics. And they will focus on how science can serve society, especially through innovation in Latin America in the areas of environment, climate change and alternative energy. Tuition is $4,300 and includes 13 nights’ lodging in La Jolla, three meals a day, local transportation (including airport pickup and drop off), field trips, social events and medical insurance.

Location: UC San Diego
Event Date: Jul 15, 2013 - Jul 15, 2013
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José Galicot unveils Tijuana Innovadora 2014: Unleashing the Mexican Diaspora
Since its inception, Tijuana Innovadora has proved a powerful display of the positive aspects of the city of Tijuana and what the region is capable of. As the planning for the 2014 installment gears up, join us as founder Jose Galicot unveils the theme of next year’s extravaganza and discusses the evolution of the organization. The presentation will be followed by a public reception in the Friend Plaza at the Institute of the Americas.

Location: Institute of the Americas complex
Event Date: Jul 02, 2013 - Jul 02, 2013
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Webinar: LNG in teh Americas
Join us for a webinar discussion on LNG in the Americas with Chris Goncalves, Director of the Berkeley Research Group. Countries across Latin America are increasingly interested in natural gas as a possible energy solution and for many that means importing liquefied natural gas (LNG). Meanwhile, as shale gas production has radically transformed the United States’ energy outlook, the debate around exporting LNG has divided policy makers and industry leaders. Goncalves, an LNG expert quoted in the New York Times, will discuss the implications associated with increased US natural gas production and the prospects and challenges for LNG in our hemisphere and globally.

Location:
Event Date: Jul 02, 2013 - Jul 02, 2013
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Public Lecture at Scripps Explores Darwin's Deep Connection to the Ocean
An expert on the history of science and exploration will discuss the early days of Charles Darwin’s storied career and how the ocean played an instrumental role in its launch during a public presentation at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

Location: Scripps Seaside Forum
Event Date: Jun 14, 2013 - Jun 14, 2013
Photo By 21st Century China Program
U.S. Pivot to Asia: What Does it Mean for the U.S.-China Relations?
In this public talk, moderated by Professor Susan Shirk, Chair of the 21st Century China Program, Asian foreign policy consultant and UC San Diego alumnus Kurt Campbell will discuss U.S.-China relations and America's economic engagement with the Asia-Pacific. His role as former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs at the U.S. State Department took him to every corner of the region advocating for American interests and promoting trade and investment. He was widely credited as one of the key architects of “Pivot to Asia,” a comprehensive strategy under the Obama administration aimed at advancing U.S. national interest in Asia.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, Institute of the Americas, Hojel Hall Auditorium
Event Date: Jun 07, 2013 - Jun 07, 2013
Photo By IRPS
Drug Violence Shaping Prostitution on the Border


Location: Institute of the Americas Building Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: Jun 05, 2013 - Jun 05, 2013
Photo By Blink
Chican@ Legacy Mural Re-Dedication


Location:
Event Date: May 25, 2013 - May 25, 2013
Photo By IR/PS
More than Winning: Why Governments and Parties Manipulate Elections
Why do parties and governments manipulate elections? Electoral manipulation is frequently utilized excessively and perpetrated blatantly, even when it does not contribute to winning. Widespread practice of electoral manipulation is not only a tool used to gain votes, but also a means of distorting information. In this talk, Alberto Simpser will expand upon this and argue that there’s more at stake in manipulating elections than simply winning.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, Social Sciences Building, Room 107
Event Date: May 23, 2013 - May 23, 2013
Photo By CCIS
Immigration and the ‘Republican’ Model in France
To what extent is the French republican model still viable in debates over immigration and integration in France today? Viewed from the perspective of the last thirty years, which saw the rise of a powerful anti-immigrant political movement, the Front National, one might conclude that immigration in postwar France has been raging out of control. Yet despite the remarkable showing of the Front National in recent presidential elections, France has remained a relatively open immigration country, a tradition which dates from the middle of the nineteenth century. Annual levels of immigration have not fallen much below 100,000 since the early 1950s, the right to asylum has been respected by every postwar government, and France has maintained what is arguably the most liberal naturalization policy in Western Europe. How can we explain this continuity in the midst of crisis? I argue that the continuity in the principles and outcomes of French immigration policy is closely linked to the power of the republican model and to the limits of control that are a function of rights-based politics.

Location: ERC 115
Event Date: May 22, 2013 - May 22, 2013
Photo By Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies
What Happens When a Weak Executive Branch Interacts with Decentralized Parties in Congress?
Can the Mexican congress substitute a weak executive as the main promoter of federal laws when decentralization of parties stimulates the promotion of legislative projects focused on local or particularistic jurisdictions? If so, what types of institutional arrangements can restrain this outcome? In order to answer these questions, the level of aggregation of the proposed and approved initiatives of the Chamber of Deputies in Mexico during the last three legislatures are analyzed.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
Event Date: May 22, 2013 - May 22, 2013
Photo By Center on Emerging and Pacific Economies (EmPac)
Mexico’s Future: Education, Entrepreneurship and Legal Reforms
Alejandro Poiré will argue that the future of Mexico’s prosperity lies in its capacity to simultaneously consolidate the rule of law reforms promoted in the last few years, enhance legal transformations in several areas of economic activity, and systematically open up its democratic institutions. But above and beyond these politically-driven reforms, Mexico’s future depends on its ability to unleash the entrepreneurial potential of a growing cadre of young professionals who are going through the ranks of Mexico’s higher education system.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, The Great Hall
Event Date: May 21, 2013 - May 21, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
XXII La Jolla Energy Conference
Each May, for twenty-two years, the Institute of the Americas has convened a high-level hemispheric energy summit known as “The La Jolla Conference.” Recognized as the most significant meeting of its kind, it is the Institute’s signature event.

Location: Hilton Torrey Pines
Event Date: May 20, 2013 - May 22, 2013
Photo By Global Health Initaitive
Telemedicine & International Health
Do you wonder what it's like to practice healthcare in another country? Join us for an Interactive International Telemedicine Opportunity! This is a completely participatory event where you will be able to help evaluate patients and take part in their surgeries. These Cleft Lip and Palate surgeries will be performed in Mexico, and through the clinic and OR cameras you will be able to fully interact with the patients and surgeons. It is a great opportunity to ask your questions about International Healthcare. The surgeons on the ground and the moderators at UCSD all have extensive experience practicing medicine internationally. This is a CME accredited event perfect for Physicians and Medical Students!

Location: Medical Education & Telemedicine Bldg, Rm LL154
Event Date: May 18, 2013 - May 18, 2013
Photo By Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies
Mexican Migration to the United States: Underlying Economic Factors and Possible Scenarios for Future Flows
What factors influence Mexican migration to the United States? Daniel Chiquiar will examine some economic factors that have influenced migration flows from Mexico to the U.S., for the purpose of constructing scenarios on how such flows could evolve in the near term. To understand the evolution of migration flows, he will look at three different periods in the recent history of migration and will link the behavior of such flows to change in sectoral growth in the U.S., as well as to a heterogeneous participation of Mexican workers in employment by sector.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, Institute of the Americas, Weaver Center
Event Date: May 15, 2013 - May 15, 2013
Photo By Stanford Department of History
Colonies of Humanity? Violence and Humanitarianism in the Modern French Empire
This talk will explore the extent to which commitments to the betterment of humanity influenced the way that the French understood and ruled their empire from about 1890 to 1940. By looking at acts of quotidian violence and especially the abuse of colonial laborers, it examines the way in which a host of French men and women responded to cases of brutal exploitation of non-Europeans. The talk will consider how eyewitness testimonies, bureaucratic practices, and internationalist interventions shaped both debate about the mistreatment of colonial subjects, as well as the reform of colonialism’s penchant to cause suffering.

Location: Social Science Building Room 107
Event Date: May 13, 2013 - May 13, 2013
Photo By IICAS
Israel and the Palestinians in the Second Obama Term
Dr. Ibish will look at challenges facing Israel, the Palestinians and especially the United States that are beginning to unfold in the second Obama administration. Can the United States and the parties overcome the diplomatic impasse? If not, in the short term, what stopgap measures could be taken to prevent the situation from deteriorating even further? What is Israel's vision of the short and long-term future? How can the PA proceed without Salam Fayyad as Prime Minister or institution-building as its primary focus of government? And how does the United States deal with the oxymoron of a "vital national interest" that is nonetheless subject to vetoes by the parties themselves, particularly if progress continues to be thwarted?

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Building (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: May 10, 2013 - May 10, 2013
Photo By IR/PS
The China-North Korea Relationship in Perspective
With increased tensions following North Korea’s third nuclear test, the U.S. and much of the world look to China– North Korea’s biggest ally and supporter– to rein in North Korea's behavior. Increased public Chinese criticism of North Korea and Beijing’s support for new UN Security Council Resolution 2094– designed to block North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs– may reflect China's change of tack. Our panelists will address China's response to North Korea’s drive to expand its nuclear and long-range missile capabilities, examining how the China-North Korea relationship is shaped by China’s internal dynamics and the broader context of its relations with the United States.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: May 09, 2013 - May 09, 2013
Photo By IICAS
Love and Dissolution: Toward a Gendered Ethic of Psychiatric Care in India
Critiques of psychiatry in India and, especially, of its care of women, tend to focus on notions of stigma, seeing the family as agent of either abandonment or embracing care, views that coincide with differing visions of India’s place on a global stage. This talk will consider the limits of this framework, asking how dissolutions inherent to kinship, and the ways women bear the burdens of those vulnerabilities, figure in decisions small and large surrounding the care of women with mental illnesses. Based on ethnographic research conducted in several north Indian cities, it traces the movements of several women through different sites and settings of care – homes, wards, clinics, and shrines - and asks what everyday complexities of kinship, marriage, divorce, and parenthood tell us about the stakes of mental illness for women and the place of clinical practice in intimate life. What are the implications of these forms of love and dissolution for ethics and epistemologies – for knowing and caring for others?

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Building (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: May 09, 2013 - May 09, 2013
Photo By Blink
Compadre and Kasama: Moments of Chican@ and Pin@y Solidarity
Literature professor Amanda Lee A. Solomon discusses the legacy of Filipino agricultural organizing and interethnic coalitions.

Location: Cross Cultural Center
Event Date: May 08, 2013 - May 08, 2013
Photo By Social Sciences & Humanities Library
Living the Past: in Honor of San Diego's Holocaust Survivors
Millions of holocaust victims did not survive the Nazis’ genocidal assault on the Jews and others deemed unworthy of life. Many victims did survive, however, and a significant number of survivors ended up in San Diego. To honor their invaluable work on behalf of Holocaust education, on May 8, HLHW will host two of San Diego’s Holocaust survivors, Lou Dunst and Frances Gelbart. Originally from Czechoslovakia and Poland, respectively, Dunst and Gelbart passed through several concentration camps, including Auschwitz and Mauthausen. Living the Past: in Honor of San Diego's Holocaust Survivors is dedicated to the survivors and their stories. This workshop event is sponsored by Phyllis and Dan Epstein. This event will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Seuss Room in Geisel Library. No reservations are required and refreshments are provided.

Location: Geisel Library Seuss Room
Event Date: May 08, 2013 - May 08, 2013
Photo By IRPS
U.S. Foreign Assistance for the Arab Spring


Location: UC San Diego Campus, IR/PS, Robinson Auditorium
Event Date: May 08, 2013 - May 08, 2013
Photo By Blink
Chicano Legacy: 40 Años Mural
2011 documentary film. Chronicles the back story, installation, and unveiling of the Mario Torero mural at Peterson Hall

Location: Cross-Cultural Center
Event Date: May 07, 2013 - May 07, 2013
Photo By Institute of Americas
USAID Assist. Admin. Feierstein talks about Obama’s Development Priorities in Latin America
The Institute of the Americas is delighted to host a talk with Mark Feierstein, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Assistant Administrator for Latin America and the Caribbean, who has over 25 years of experience working on development issues in the region. Assistant Administrator Feierstein’s talk will focus on President Obama’s second-term development priorities for the region and discuss the outcomes of the President’s trip to Mexico and Costa Rica.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Weaver Center
Event Date: May 07, 2013 - May 07, 2013
Photo By IRPS
How Would the Chinese Government Respond to Another Tiananmen-style Protest?
Yang Su teaches and writes about social movements and protests. He authored the book "Collective Killings in Rural China during the Cultural Revolution" (Cambridge, 2011), which won the 2012 Barrington Moore Award for the best book in the area of comparative and historical sociology presented by the American Sociological Association.

Location: UC San Diego Campus, IR/PS, Room 3202
Event Date: May 02, 2013 - May 02, 2013
Photo By Department of History
From Text to Interpretation
The Hebrew Bible was, from the beginning, the Interpreted Bible. In the third and second centuries B.C.E. – well before the last books of the Bible were written – groups of interpreters were puzzling over the stories of Abraham and Sarah, Jacob and Esau, and other ancient figures. Their interpretations were often fanciful, and sometimes wildly inventive, but their grasp of the very idea of the Bible is still with us and continues to influence today’s readers.

Location: Revelle College, York Hall 2722
Event Date: May 02, 2013 - May 02, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Canada and the Americas: A Partnership for Global Competitiveness
The Institute of the Americas will hold a conference to examine how collaboration with Canada can help us to build North American competitiveness within the hemisphere, Asia, and emerging markets. With our integrated supply chains, Canada, the United States, and Mexico manufacture together. Through our mutual strengths, resource endowments and capacities for innovation, we can re-establish North America as the leading economic engine of growth in the world. This conference will expose Southern California business leaders and academics to the latest in Canadian business and academic thinking on North America competitiveness, as well as provide a forum for Canadian businesses to network with the San Diego-Tijuana region high tech business center.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Event Date: May 01, 2013 - May 01, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Tequila Talk with Dr. Shannon O’Neil: US-Mexico Relations on the Eve of the Obama-Peña Nieto Summit
The Institute of the Americas and the Center for U.S- Mexican Studies are pleased to host a Tequila Talk with Shannon O’Neil, Senior Fellow for Latin American Studies at the renowned think-tank Council on Foreign Relations.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas Complex, Weaver Center
Event Date: Apr 30, 2013 - Apr 30, 2013
Photo By Blink
La Mission
2009 film starring Benjamin Bratt

Location: Cross Cultural Center
Event Date: Apr 30, 2013 - Apr 30, 2013
Photo By CCIS
Will Comprehensive Immigration Reform Pass? Predicting Legislative Support and Opposition to CIR
Will comprehensive immigration reform (CIR) pass in 2013? The momentum that has been building towards CIR, which accelerated with last November’s presidential election and has since grown even more with the recent introduction of the Senate ‘gang of 8's” bill, has shown no signs of slowing down. As a matter of politics, the key question is whether there are enough votes in Congress? While there are no crystal balls to tell us how legislators will ultimately vote, the recent history of immigration politics in the U.S. provides sufficient information to make informed predictions, not only about how current members of Congress are likely to vote on the final passage of CIR, but also about how they are likely to vote on the various amendments that will be introduced. By modeling voting behavior on all recent immigration – related legislation – which provides some 6,000 observations in the Senate and over 10,000 observations in the House – I provide estimates for all 535 current members of Congress of the number of yes and no votes on the final passage of CIR, as well as estimates for a number of key amendments that, if passed, could fundamentally alter the bill.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Apr 29, 2013 - Apr 29, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Cross-Border Science Journalism Workshop
A first-of-its kind workshop to create and strengthen cross-border exchanges for journalists reporting on science, environment, agriculture, health, and other issues in which the U.S. and Latin America have a shared link and vital stake. The Institute of the Americas and the National Association of Science Writers will present an interactive workshop for journalists and editors from both sides of the border who cover scientific research and science-based economic news. Panelists will discuss resources of identifying and reporting, markets on both sides of the border, cyber security and new reporters’ tools. The keynote speaker is Exequiel Ezcurra, Ph.D., director of the University of California Institute for Mexico and the United States (UC MEXUS), an academic research institute dedicated to encouraging, securing, and contributing to binational and Latino research and collaborative academic programs and exchanges.

Location: Institute of the Americas complex
Event Date: Apr 27, 2013 - Apr 27, 2013
Photo By ICenter
International Cafe - Madagascar
Café hours: 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. Every Friday during the academic year Cost: All lunches are only $5 per person. There is always a vegetarian alternative available.

Location: ICenter Plaza
Event Date: Apr 26, 2013 - Apr 26, 2013
Photo By UMayor
Conversations with Chilean legal expert Clara Szczaranski
What separates Chile from the rest of the pack when it comes to sustained economic growth? Ms. Szczaranski will discuss the changes in Chile's commercial and legal environment that have made the nation ripe for private sector-led economic development. She will also share her personal experience in financial inclusion, commercial law, law enforcement and human rights.

Location: Institute of the Americas complex
Event Date: Apr 24, 2013 - Apr 24, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Jorge López de Cárdenas (Schlumberger) on Energy and Technology in Mexico
Join us for a discussion on the role of technology in Mexico’s energy sector with Jorge López de Cárdenas, Director of Technology for Schlumberger Mexico and Central America. Mexico has entered a new era with the end of “easy" oil and an increased focus on the exploitation of abundant, yet technically difficult, reserves, including shale gas, deepwater, and mature fields, where technology will be critical to renewed production. López de Cárdenas will explore the challenges facing energy policy for the new administration, and the importance of promoting technology and knowledge transfer in Mexico.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Apr 24, 2013 - Apr 24, 2013
Photo By UCSD Literature Department
Amos Oz "Zionist Dreams and Israeli Realities"


Location: Mandeville Auditorium
Event Date: Apr 22, 2013 - Apr 22, 2013
Photo By www.kirshdem.com
Smetana Trio
Founded in the 1930s, the Smetana Trio featured some of the Czech Republic’s leading soloists of the time. The tradition of excellence has continued to this day, as cellist Jan Pálenícek continues the work of his father, Josef, an original member of the ensemble. The three current members are all distinguished Czech soloists in their own right, but together, they create a cohesive harmony celebrated throughout Europe and around the world. Jiri Vodicka, violin; Jan Pálenícek, cello; Jitka Cechova, piano.

Location: Dept. of Music's Conrad Prebys Concert Hall
Event Date: Apr 19, 2013 - Apr 19, 2013
Photo By ICenter
International Cafe - New Zealand
Café hours: 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. Every Friday during the academic year Cost: All lunches are only $5 per person. There is always a vegetarian alternative available.

Location: ICenter Plaza
Event Date: Apr 19, 2013 - Apr 19, 2013
Photo By UCSD Economics Department
Emerging Markets Perspective on the European Debt Crisis
Robert S. Koenigsberger is founder, chief investment officer and the managing partner of Gramercy. He founded Gramercy in 1998 with a vision for the firm to become a global, institutional investment management firm focused on emerging markets. Koenigsberger has more than 25 years of investment experience dedicated to emerging markets with a specialization in fixed income securities. He serves as portfolio manager for Gramercy Argentina Opportunity Fund and co-portfolio manager for Gramercy Emerging Markets Fund, Gramercy Distressed Opportunity Fund and Gramercy Distressed Opportunity Fund II. In 2010, he led Gramercy’s efforts in conceiving, organizing and facilitating the successful restructuring of Argentina’s defaulted debt, the first private sector-led restructuring of a sovereign default. Koenigsberger is head of the Investment Committee and the Asset Allocation Committee.

Location: UC San Diego Faculty Club
Event Date: Apr 18, 2013 - Apr 18, 2013
Photo By IICAS
Does Information Lead to More Active Citizenship? Evidence from an Education Intervention in Rural Kenya
We study a randomized educational intervention in 550 households in 26 matched villages in two Kenyan districts. The intervention provided parents with information about their children’s performance on literacy and numeracy tests, and materials about how to become more involved in improving their children’s learning. We find the provision of such information had no discernible impact on either private or collective action. In discussing these findings, we articulate a causal chain linking information provision to changes in citizens’ behavior, and assess the present intervention at each step. Future research on information provision should pay greater attention to this causal chain.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Apr 18, 2013 - Apr 18, 2013
Photo By ArtPwr
Mamak Khadem - Artpower!
The poet Rumi referred to “the place where everything is music.” Mamak Khadem, a classically trained Persian singer who has studied her art in both Iran and her adopted United States, helps keep that place in Iranian culture alive, vital, and growing. A lead singer of the cross-cultural fusion ensemble Axiom Of Choice and vibrant solo artist, Mamak Khadem has performed at major concert venues, including the Skirball Cultural Center, the Greek Theater, the Smithsonian Museum, and at festivals worldwide. In her recent album Jostojoo (Forever Seeking), Mamak Khadem continues her exploration of Persian poetry set to carefully chosen melodies from her culture’s far-reaching folk and classical repertoire.

Location: The Loft
Event Date: Apr 17, 2013 - Apr 17, 2013
Photo By CCIS
When White is Just Alright: How Immigrants Redefine Achievement and Reconfigure the Ethnoracial Hierarchy
Research on immigration, educational achievement, and ethnoraciality has followed the lead of racialization and assimilation theories by focusing empirical attention on the immigrant-origin population (immigrants and their children) and effectively ignoring the third-plus generation (those who are US-born of US-born parents). We depart from this orthodox approach by placing third-plus-generation individuals at center stage to examine how they adjust to norms that the immigrant-origin population defines.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Apr 17, 2013 - Apr 17, 2013
Photo By bragabouttoursblog.blogspot.com
The Other Face of Development in Colombia
This event presents their experiences and provides an opportunity for students to gain insights into the challenges raised by efforts to promote peace and development that will benefit people in their local communities and not just national statistics. UCSD Faculty Discussants will provide a comparative perspective on the Colombian experience. Join us for an award-winning documentary, panel discussion and reception.

Location: Hojel Auditorium, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Apr 17, 2013 - Apr 17, 2013
Photo By www.realmagick.com
Mara Leitchman: Conversion to Shi‘i Islam and the Transformation of Religious Authority in Senegal
Mara Leichtman is assistant professor of Anthropology and Muslim Studies at Michigan State University. Her book manuscript is entitled Shi‘i Cosmopolitanisms in Africa: Lebanese Migration and Religious Conversion in Senegal. Dr. Leichtman has edited (with Dorothea Schulz) a special journal issue of City and Society on Muslim Cosmopolitanism: Movement, Identity, and Contemporary Reconfigurations (2012) and (with Mamadou Diouf) the book New Perspectives on Islam in Senegal: Conversion, Migration, Wealth, Power, and Femininity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). Her articles have appeared in Anthropological Quarterly, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Journal of Religion in Africa, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Shi’a Affairs Journal, Journal of North African Studies and Identities. She was interviewed by The Economist and PBS’ The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, and her research was featured in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Dr. Leichtman was a visiting fellow at the Zentrum Moderner Orient in Berlin, Germany and the International Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World in Leiden, the Netherlands. Currently she is collaborating on a multi-year and multi-country research project entitled “Religion and the Private Sphere: Religious Dynamics, Everyday Experiences and the Individual in West Africa,” funded by the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Apr 15, 2013 - Apr 15, 2013
Photo By UCSD Center on Global Justice
French Prime Minister (1997-2002) on: “Europe: A Continent in Decline or a Model for the Future?”
For the last thirty years Lionel Jospin has been one of the major and most respected figures of the French and European political stage. Before being Prime Minister, from 1997 to 2002 he was the Secretary General of the French Socialist Party (1981-1988), and later Education Minister (1988-1992). After contributing significantly to the modernization of his party, he was its candidate in the 1995 presidential election and again in 2002, when he was widely expected to win; yet the excessive number of candidates on the left deprived him of this victory. Lionel Jospin has since retired from active politics, but not from public life. His five years as Prime Minister will be remembered as decisive years in terms of economic growth and social peace.

Location: The Great Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: Apr 15, 2013 - Apr 15, 2013
Photo By ICenter
International Cafe - Iceland
Café hours: 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. Every Friday during the academic year Cost: All lunches are only $5 per person. There is always a vegetarian alternative available.

Location: ICenter Plaza
Event Date: Apr 12, 2013 - Apr 12, 2013
Photo By IICAS
Rethinking the Jewish-Iraqi Experience in Mid-20th Century Iraq
Orit Bashkin is a professor of Modern Arab history at the University of Chicago. She received her Ph.D. from Princeton University (2004) and her BA (1995) and MA (1999) from Tel Aviv University. Her publications include 20 book chapters and articles on the history of Arab-Jews in Iraq, on Iraqi history and on Arabic literature. She has also edited a book, Sculpturing Culture in Egypt with Israel Gershoni and Liat Kozma, which included translations into Hebrew of seminal works by Egyptian intellectuals. She is the author of the following books: The Other Iraq – Pluralism, Intellectuals and Culture in Hashemite Iraq, 1921-1958, Stanford University Press, 2009 [Paperback, 2010], and New Babylonians: A History of Jews in Modern Iraq [Stanford University Press, 2012].

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Apr 11, 2013 - Apr 11, 2013
Photo By Center on Global Justice
Climate Justice with Mary Robinson
Mary Robinson, the first woman President of Ireland (1990-1997), former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002), and founder and President of Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative (2002-2010), has spent most of her life as a human rights advocate. Born Mary Bourke in Ballina, County Mayo (1944), the daughter of two physicians, she was educated at the University of Dublin (Trinity College), King’s Inns Dublin and Harvard Law School to which she won a fellowship in 1967.

Location: Price Center East Ballroom/SIO Forum
Event Date: Apr 10, 2013 - Apr 11, 2013
Photo By SSI
International Year of Water Cooperation
The Greenovation Forum series facilitates and accelerates innovation, dialogue, and action in San Diego's green technology sector. By providing an ongoing venue for collaboration between UC San Diego, industry, government, philanthropy and social-benefit organizations, the Forum nurtures the discovery of practical solutions for sustainability at all scales.

Location: Atkinson Auditorium, Calit2
Event Date: Apr 10, 2013 - Apr 10, 2013
Photo By THE JAMES K. BINDER LECTURESHIP IN LITERATURE
Roger Chartier: From the Writer's Hand to the Printer's Mind. Who is an Author in Early Modern Europe?
This perhaps unexpected chiasmus is intended to show that if every decision made in a printing shop, even the most mechanical ones about lay-out or punctuation, implies the use of reason and understanding, literary creation always confronts an initial materiality of the text - that of the pages of the manuscript written or dictated by its author. This fact justifies the attempt to create a close connection between cultural history and textual criticism and, also, to suggest the importance of the rupture occurred in the eighteenth-century when writers were consecrated, autograph manuscripts were highly prized, and people became obsessed with the author's hand.

Location: The Atkinson Pavilion at the Faculty Club
Event Date: Apr 09, 2013 - Apr 09, 2013
Photo By UC San Diego
Marshall College Cultural Celebration
Celebrate cultural diversity through food, dance, music, and art from around the world! Taste delicious cuisines and tour artisan crafts from local merchants and vendors. Enjoy live entertainment featuring a diverse range of performers, and have fun playing games from all around the world. Join us at Marshall College to experience one of the largest and longest standing traditions at UCSD!

Location: Marshall College
Event Date: Apr 06, 2013 - Apr 06, 2013
Photo By ICenter
International Cafe - Sri Lanka
Café hours: 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. Every Friday during the academic year Cost: All lunches are only $5 per person. There is always a vegetarian alternative available.

Location: ICenter Plaza
Event Date: Apr 05, 2013 - Apr 05, 2013
Photo By IR/PS
Toward a More Harmonious World: The Place of Humanities and Social Sciences Eduction in China
Professor YANG Yu-liang is a renowned scientist and educator from China. A chemist by profession, he was elected as an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2003, the highest honor bestowed to a scientist in China. His research interest is in condensed matter physics and polymer science. He has served as the President of Fudan University since 2009.

Location: UC San Diego, The Great Hall
Event Date: Apr 04, 2013 - Apr 04, 2013
Photo By latimesblog
Venezuela after Chavez
With Venezuela’s presidential election set to take place on April 14, Institute President Charles S. Shapiro will discuss the country’s politics and economy and share his private conversations with former President Hugo Chavez, acting President Nicolas Maduro and opposition candidate Gov. Henrique Capriles. The death of Hugo Chavez marks the end of an era. Join us for an inside look at the 14-year administration of one of the most visible, vocal and controversial leaders in Latin America and a discussion of Venezuela after Chavez.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Weaver Conference Center
Event Date: Apr 02, 2013 - Apr 02, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Webinar: Energy and the Economy in Mexico: a discussion with Dr. Juan Pardinas (IMCO)
Energy security is fundamental for Mexico’s economic well-being and competitiveness. Yet the country has frequently been characterized by a disconnect between the country’s energy sector and the rest of the national and global economy. Three months into President Enrique Peña Nieto’s term, what are the next steps for the new administration and how can the Mexican oil and gas sector best serve as a driver of economic development in the country? This event will be held in Spanish.

Location: Webinar
Event Date: Mar 26, 2013 - Mar 26, 2013
Photo By UC San Diego
China's Growing Population
The Fudan-UC Center on Contemporary China will host a day-long conference on "China's Domestic Challenges" that will bring together scholars from throughout the University of California system and from Fudan University to discuss China’s contemporary domestic challenges. A keynote address on "China's Growing Population: Current Trends and Future Challenges" by PENG Xizhe and a tribute to the late UCLA Professor Rick Baum (1940-2012) will be paid at the evening program.

Location: UC San Diego, Village West, Floor Fifteen, Room A
Event Date: Mar 25, 2013 - Mar 25, 2013
Photo By U.S. Dept of State
U.S. Assistant Secretary Roberta S. Jacobson on U.S. policy toward Latin America in President Obama’s 2nd Term
U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson is the top State Department official responsible for policy toward the Hemisphere, shaping our relationships with the Americas on far-reaching issues of international importance.

Location: Institute of the Americas complex
Event Date: Mar 18, 2013 - Mar 18, 2013
Photo By UC San Diego
From Shtetl to Shetl: A Journey Across 3 Continents
Franklin Gaylis grew up in South Africa, the country his Baltic grandparents had emigrated to in the early 1900s. In 1982 he came to the United States where he became a practicing physician. The birth of his children sparked an interest in his European ancestors. To find out more about his Jewish roots, he embarked upon a quest for his Lithuanian and Latvian family history. At this talk Dr. Gaylis shares insights gained from his trip to the Baltics and to several small towns in South Africa. Everyone invited. Refreshments provided.

Location: Seuss Room, Geisel Library
Event Date: Mar 13, 2013 - Mar 13, 2013
Photo By ??INAMORI FOUNDATION
12th Annual Kyoto Prize Symposium
Leading molecular cell biologist and 2012 Kyoto Prize recipient, Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi will be presenting his studies on autophagy, a process by which a cell recycles proteins to generate energy in order to survive or eliminate harmful bacteria. This process, which happens naturally in all cells, sheds light on how diseased cells survive, and could impact solutions to heal degenerative heart and neurological diseases, even cancer. The Kyoto Prize is an international award given every year in several disciplines to those who have made significant contributions to mankind. Dr. Ohsumi received the award for his advancement of the knowledge and application of autophagy in science and medicine. The event is free and open to the public. For information and to register, visit www.kyotoprize.org/en/.

Location: Price Center East Ballroom
Event Date: Mar 13, 2013 - Mar 13, 2013
Photo By IR/PS
The Inaugural Robert F. Ellsworth Memorial Lecture
Jeffrey Bader will provide an overview of the Obama administration’s efforts to develop stable relations with China while improving relationships with key partners who are worried about Beijing’s new assertiveness. Bader discusses what steps were taken and interprets what it meant—first during the Obama campaign, and then for the administration. He will provide an illuminating backstage view of the formulation and execution of American foreign policy as well as a candid assessment of both.

Location: The Great Hall, UC San Diego Campus
Event Date: Mar 12, 2013 - Mar 12, 2013
Photo By IICAS
The Iraq War Since 2003: Ten Years of Consequences
March 2013 marks the tenth anniversary of the start of the Iraq War. This discussion will focus on some of the consequences of the war from the perspective of Iraqis and the Middle East generally.

Location: Robinson Auditorium, IR/PS Complex
Event Date: Mar 12, 2013 - Mar 12, 2013
Photo By UCSD Literature Department
Cameran Ashraf: "Technology and the Places of Everyday Life"
Cameran Ashraf is an Iranian-American human rights and political activist, social entrepreneur, digital activism pioneer, and doctoral student at UCLA. Cameran and his team worked to defend opposition websites, provide secure communications tools to activists, and facilitate more than 3 million video downloads from inside Iran. He is co-founder of the international technology and human rights organization AccessNow, shortlisted by the European Parliament for the 2010 Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. His doctoral research focuses on the intersection between technology, politics, and the way we experience and envision space and place.

Location: Literature Building Room 155 (de Certeau)
Event Date: Mar 11, 2013 - Mar 11, 2013
Photo By UCSD Literature Department
Russian Videopoetics and the Contemporary Russian Avant Garde Natalia Fedorova with Vanessa Place
Natalia Fedorova is a Russian new media artist, writer, literary scholar and translator. Nataliaholds a PhD in literary theory from Herzen State University (St-Petersburg). She has written numerous publications on avant-garde poetry, kitetic poetry, concrete poetry, hyperfiction, literary text generators and video poetry, and is a curator and creator of VIDEO.txt, videopoetry festival in St- Petersburg. From 2011 to 2012, Natalia was a Fulbright postdoctoral researcher at the Trope Tank, MIT, and is currently a SPIRE postdoctorate researcher with the ELMCIP group at the University of Bergen (Norway) and editor of e-lit and new media writing column in Rattapallax magazine (NY). Natalia is the author of a hyperfiction piece with multiple endings «7», and a boutes-rime novel Madame Ebaressa and a Butterfly, co-written with Sergeij Kitov, and a number of short prose fragments. In collaboration with Taras Mashtalir she founded Machine Libertine, a media poetry project . Of Vanessa Place and Robert Fitterman’s Notes on Conceptualisms, Mary Kelly said, “I learned more about the impact of conceptualism on artists and writers than I had from reading so-called canonical works on the subject.” Kenneth Goldsmith has called Vanessa Place’s work “arguably the most challenging, complex and controversial literature being written today.” Rae Armantrout has said, “Vanessa Place is writing terminal poetry.”

Location: Literature Building Room 155 (de Certeau)
Event Date: Mar 11, 2013 - Mar 11, 2013
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4th Annual Keeling Memorial Lecture
Renowned Scripps Institution of Oceanography scientist Richard Somerville will deliver the fourth annual Keeling Memorial Lecture Monday at 6:30 p.m. at Birch Aquarium. He will present a lecture titled, "The Scientific Case for Urgent Action to Limit Climate Change." The event is open to the public, and admission is $8 for the general public, $5 for students and educators, and free for Birch Aquarium at Scripps members. RSVPs are requested. The Keeling Lecture honors the memory of distinguished Scripps geochemist Charles David Keeling's life and invaluable contributions to climate science and Scripps. The famous “Keeling Curve” measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations is named for him.

Location: Birch Aquarium
Event Date: Mar 11, 2013 - Mar 11, 2013
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International Women's Day: The Movement to End Rape Post-Delhi - Public Health Perspectives and Solutions
Dr. Anita Raj is a Professor of Global Public Health and Medicine at UC San Diego. Her research focuses on epidemiologic and intervention evaluation research on issues of girl child marriage, gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health including HIV. She is currently working within the department of medicine at UC San Diego to create a new program on Gender Inequities and Global Public Health. She was also recently featured on Public Health Radio’s The World website speaking on the global movement for women’s safety since the Delhi rape protests.

Location: Price Center Ballroom A
Event Date: Mar 08, 2013 - Mar 08, 2013
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The Anthropology of Austerity in the EU


Location: Deutz Conference Room, Institute of the Americas (IOA)
Event Date: Mar 07, 2013 - Mar 07, 2013
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Reconfiguring Urban Space: Youth Activism and Cultural Production in Oaxaca, Mexico
Maurice Rafael Magana is a Visiting Fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. He is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociocultural Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon. He received his MA in Anthropology from the University of Oregon in 2008 and his BA in Anthropology from the University of South Florida in 2003. Maurice's current research examines the local political culture of autonomous youth activism in Oaxaca, Mexico and considers how urban youth are experimenting with novel forms of social and political participation in the present context of economic, social and political uncertainty. While at the University of Oregon, he has worked as a research assistant for the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, and the Center for the Study of Woman in Society's "Latinos in Rural Oregon" and "Gender, Families and Immigration in the Northwest" research initiatives.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas Complex, Deutz Room
Event Date: Mar 06, 2013 - Mar 06, 2013
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Audrey Singer – Immigrant Workers, Human Capital Investment and Strengthening Regional Economies
Coming out of the Great Recession, slow economic recovery has U.S. communities seeking strategies that will grow jobs in the short term and improve standards of living over the long term. This talk focuses on immigrants in the labor force and their skills, an especially relevant topic given that debates about immigration policy reform have started. How geographic regions can invest in the human capital and economic advancement of immigrants who are already living in their jurisdictions, to help boost short- and long-term U.S. economic growth, will be discussed.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Mar 04, 2013 - Mar 04, 2013
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Salsa Night @ The Loft
Join UCSD's own Salsa Club for a night of dancing at The Loft! Never taken a salsa class? No problem! Beginner dancers can come for a FREE dance lesson from an internationally ranked salsa dancer and instructor. The evening will also feature performances from UCSD Latin dance groups.

Location: The Loft
Event Date: Mar 02, 2013 - Mar 02, 2013
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Political Civility and Scientific Objectivity: Science, Technology and Public Policy in Democratic Societies
How should democratic societies use, and how have they used, scientific and technical expertise to guide their affairs? What institutions, ideologies, procedures, standards, and expertise have (or should have) been applied in inferring factual decisions in public affairs? This set of interdisciplinary and interconnected questions is fast becoming centre-stage in the humanities and social sciences, and this conference will bring together leading researchers from all corners of the academy to explore the potential for interdisciplinary cooperation in studying them.

Location: Deutz Conference Room, Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Mar 01, 2013 - Mar 03, 2013
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"The Spanish Craze:" The Discovery of the Arts and Cultures of the Hispanic World in the United States, ca. 1880-ca. 1930
Among the many vogues associated with the history of taste in the United States, few were as long-lasting or widespread as the “Spanish Craze.” Beginning in the 1880s, this craze, starting almost simultaneously in New York, Florida, and Southern California, initially manifested itself in the realm of architecture, but soon spread quickly into the realms of art, cinema, fashion, literature, and motion pictures. This illustrated lecture offers an overview of this craze together with an examination of the many factors that sparked the country’s “discovery” of the arts and cultures of the broader Hispanic world.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Feb 28, 2013 - Feb 28, 2013
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Greening the Military: How the Armed Forces are Driving the Cleantech Industry
The IR/PS chapter of Net Impact presents the "Greening the Military: How the Armed Forces are Driving the Cleantech Industry." The Forum aims to bring together researchers, practitioners, policy-makers, entrepreneurs, government representatives, students, and business/community members working on the environmental challenges of today's world.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS Robinson Building Complex Auditorium
Event Date: Feb 28, 2013 - Feb 28, 2013
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U.S. Cold War policy toward Latin America, 1945-1969
The seminar is presented by Juan Du, a Visiting Scholar from China. For more information about her, please visit the People/Visiting Scholars tab on our website.

Location: Deutz room, Copley Building, at the Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Feb 28, 2013 - Feb 28, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Collective Remittances and the Program 3x1 For Migrants in Mexico: Investment in Local Development and Labor Market Effects
Karina Córdova is a Visiting Fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics at the University of Arizona, where she also got her Master's degree. She received a B.A. in Economics from CIDE (Mexico City) in 2003. Karina has worked as an economic consultant studying the informal sector in Mexico, and as a research assistant in the Mexican Family Life Survey 2002 and 2005. She studies how collective remittances sent by migrant clubs to be invested in community projects can affect local labor markets improving job opportunities. Her research agenda also includes a series of laboratory experiments to analyze the effects of stress and uncertainty on productivity, decision-making and investment choices.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas Complex, Deutz Room
Event Date: Feb 27, 2013 - Feb 27, 2013
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Will China Fall into a Middle Income Trap?
Despite China's recent robust growth, there is concern that as the country continues to move up the income ladder, its high level of inequality may be a breeding ground for future instability. Scott Rozelle, Helen F. Farnsworth Senior Fellow, and Co-Director of the Rural Education Action Program at Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, will seek to put China’s economic performance and growth-inequality status into perspective. Inequality will be looked at in terms of both the past and present income inequality and in terms of human capital.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: Feb 26, 2013 - Feb 26, 2013
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International Cafe at ICenter: South Africa
Beef Bobotie Geel Rys (yellow rice) Tomato Salad Melkter (Creamy milk tart) There is always a vegetarian alternative available.

Location: ICenter Plaza
Event Date: Feb 22, 2013 - Feb 22, 2013
Photo By IICAS
Gender, Education, and Support for Militant Groups: Evidence From a Public Opinion Survey in Pakistan
Afzal uses 2009 public opinion survey data from Pakistan to show that the relationship between education and support for terrorism varies by gender. Specifically, as women become more educated, they are less likely to support militant groups, whereas uneducated women are more likely to support militant groups relative to uneducated men, controlling for religiosity, demographics, region, and terrorist events in the district. The effect of women’s education is driven by the years of schooling immediately preceding and following high school. Afzal discusses possible omitted factors which could explain the results.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Feb 21, 2013 - Feb 21, 2013
Photo By UCSD USMEX
Beyond the U.S.-Mexico Border Buildup: Security, Migrants and Immigration Reform
Join Maureen Meyer and Adam Isacson of the Washington Office on Latin America, whose 2012 report "Beyond the Border Buildup" documents the incredible growth in the U.S. security apparatus, and the humanitarian crisis of migrants, at the border. Isacson and Meyer have carried out research in six different border zones since 2011, including a November survey of south Texas, and are involved in the fast-moving debate in Washington. They will be joined by René Zenteno, a professor at the Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF) in Tijuana, Mexico and former Undersecretary for Population, Migration and Religious Affairs at Mexico's Secretary of Interior. Recent studies by Dr. Zenteno in the Mexican Migration Monitor analyze trends in Mexican migration, including an increase in unauthorized Mexican migration in 2012.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas Complex, Weaver Center
Event Date: Feb 21, 2013 - Feb 21, 2013
Photo By IR/PS
Political Trampolines: the Alianza de Camioneros and the Logic of PRI Corporatism in 20th-Century Mexico
Michael Lettieri is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. He is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, San Diego. He received a BA in History and Spanish from Bowdoin College. Prior to beginning his Ph.D., he worked as a Research Fellow at the council on Hemispheric Affairs in Washington, D.C. and maintains an active interest in contemporary Latin American politics. His research focuses on the informal mechanisms of PRI rule using a case study of the public transportation industry. Through this, he examines the central role intermediaries and mid-level political actors played in sustaining the soft-authoritarian system. He has received support for this project from a Fullbright-Hays grant, as well as several awards from UC San Diego research centers.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas Complex, Deutz Room
Event Date: Feb 20, 2013 - Feb 20, 2013
Photo By Institute of the Americas
Border Conference on the US-Mexico Competitiveness Agenda
This event continues an initiative launched by the Council in Laredo, Texas, in August 2012 with the objective of fostering a public-private dialogue on improving management of the U.S.-Mexico border and deepening economic integration. This encounter will bring together key actors from the private, public and non-profit sectors in both Mexico and the United States.

Location: http://www.iamericas.org/en/about-ioa/location-and-map
Event Date: Feb 14, 2013 - Feb 14, 2013
Photo By UCSD Black Staff Association
"A Bourbon Street Affair" - Black History Month Luncheon
This year's theme “A Bourbon Street Affair” will offer a unique opportunity to highlight contributions of African-Americans and New Orleans culture, attendees can network with campus leaders and members of the greater community. A memorable occasion indeed and your support would truly make a difference!

Location: Porter's Pub
Event Date: Feb 14, 2013 - Feb 14, 2013
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Simon Shaheen Quintet: Arab Traditional and Contemporary Music
Simon Shaheen dazzles listeners as he deftly leaps from traditional Arabic sounds to jazz and Western classical styles. With five critically acclaimed albums, eleven Grammy nominations for his 2001 album, Blue Flame, and a White House National Heritage Award, Shaheen is one of the most significant Arab musicians, performers, and composers of his generation. His soaring technique, melodic ingenuity, and unparalleled grace have earned him international acclaim as a virtuoso on the oud and violin. Shaheen’s work with his quintet incorporates and reflects a legacy of Arabic music, while it forges ahead to new frontiers, embracing many different styles in the process.

Location: Price Center East Ballroom
Event Date: Feb 08, 2013 - Feb 08, 2013
Photo By IRPS
China's New Urban Poor and its Consciousness
Do the 22 million or so urban recipients of the Minimum Livelihood Guarantee [the dibao], whose per capita family income falls below a locally-set poverty line, properly constitute a “class”; and do they see themselves that way? Is the Chinese state benevolent toward these people, and do those who depend upon that state believe they can count on it?

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: Feb 04, 2013 - Feb 04, 2013
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Fantastic Fans from Africa & the African Diaspora
Fantastic Fans from Africa & the African Diaspora exhibit features: woven fans from the African continent; ''church fans'' from North America popular throughout the 1900’s; souvenir fans from many nations; vintage advertisement fans that promoted black-owned businesses and advertised businesses that embraced the African-American community; fans featuring iconic images and inspirational messages of the Civil Rights Movement. Reception at the exhibit site at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday afternoon Feb 7 featuring free refreshments and fan-making activities.

Location: Geisel Library,Lower Level, West wing,
Event Date: Feb 01, 2013 - Feb 28, 2013
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Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar – The Political Economies of Immigration Law
A largely dysfunctional American immigration system is only poorly explained by simple depictions of the political economy of lawmaking in this area, blaming functional economic policy-setting, longstanding public attitudes, explicit presidential discretion, or general gridlock. Instead, the structure of immigration law emerges from intersecting effects of three separate political economies – statutory compromises rooted in the political economy of lawmaking, organizational practices reflecting the political economy of implementation, and public reactions implicating the responses of policy elites and the larger public to each other.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Jan 28, 2013 - Jan 28, 2013
Photo By UCSD
The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?
The mega-bestselling author of COLLAPSE and GGS surveys the differences between "traditional" societies and industrial or post-industrial societies, with an eye to the question: what can we learn from the former that can make the world we live in a better place for all of us? People are basically all the same everywhere. "Not exactly," says Jared Diamond, in his rich new book, THE WORLD UNTIL YESTERDAY: WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM TRADITIONAL SOCIETIES?, the successor to his multimillion-copy bestsellers GUNS GERMS AND STEEL and COLLAPSE.

Location: UCSD Price Center Ballroom
Event Date: Jan 23, 2013 - Jan 23, 2013
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Censorship, Resistance, and Political Discourses in China's Cyberspace
In recent years, Chinese netizens have shown they possess boundless creativity and ingenuity in finding ways to express themselves despite government restrictions on online speech. Social media, in particular weibo, the Chinese version of twitter, has become the primary agenda-setter for media and contested platform of different political discourses. What are the patterns of the government Internet censorship? What is the significance of Chinese netizens’ creative and surprising attempts to circumvent and subvert such censorship? Are new forms of networked communication enhancing opportunities for social change and helping to move China toward a “threshold” for political transformation? Professor Qiang will discuss these questions based on his experience as the Founder and Chief Editor of China Digital Times in past nine years.

Location: UC San Diego, IR/PS, Room 3201
Event Date: Jan 22, 2013 - Jan 22, 2013
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Asia's New Energy Security Challenges
Among the topics explored by the panelists will be how the United States and Japan can lead in the creation of a new governance mechanism in energy security in Asia, and Japan’s perspective on lessons learned from the recent tsunami and the Fukushima nuclear plant accident.

Location: The Great Hall, UC San Diego
Event Date: Jan 16, 2013 - Jan 16, 2013
Photo By IRPS
The U.S. Japan Partnership: Deep Ties, New Connections, New Opportunities
With the advent of the new JAL direct service to Japan—the first-ever direct service from San Diego to any destination in Asia—and several other new non-stop flights between the U.S. and Japan, U.S. Ambassador John Roos is leading the first-ever U.S.-Japan Outreach Tour to increase awareness among American companies of opportunities to increase trade, investment and tourism as well as on-going and future U.S.-Japan technology collaboration.

Location: Atkinson Pavilion, UC San Diego Faculty Club
Event Date: Jan 09, 2013 - Jan 09, 2013
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Location: here
Event Date: Jan 01, 2013 - Jan 01, 2013
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Empathy & Immigration Policy Preferences: The Interactive Pathway for Permissive Change
Social psychology research has shown that priming both emotion-giving and perspective-taking empathy can increase positive attitudes towards other groups. Yet, political scientists have yet to explore the attitudinal implications of this emotional construct in a political context. However, in a previous pilot study of students, Chris Haynes finds evidence that empathy can have a permissive effect on people’s immigration policy preferences. Here, he builds on these insights by presenting the results of two experiments, one laboratory and one online M-Turk.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Nov 26, 2012 - Nov 26, 2012
Photo By IICAS
Shaping Precedent in International Trade Law: A Social Network Application
There is no stare decisis, or formal binding precedent, at the World Trade Organization (WTO). Yet, as this article demonstrates, countries nonetheless expend considerable resources in seeking to shape precedent in trade law.

Location: Social Sciences Building (SSB), Room 107
Event Date: Nov 15, 2012 - Nov 15, 2012
Photo By Center for Comparative Immigration Studies
2012 Presidential Elections: Ethnic Politics and the Politics of Immigration Reform Roundtable
A Roundtable Discussion on the 2012 Presidential Elections: Ethnic Politics and the Politics of Immigration Reform Panelists 1. Zoltan Hajnal, Department of Political Science, UCSD 2. Tom Wong, Department of Political Science, UCSD 3. Marisa Abrajano, Department of Political Science, UCSD 4. Efren Perez, Department of Political Science, Vanderbilt University

Location: ERC 115
Event Date: Nov 13, 2012 - Nov 13, 2012
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International Education Week
International Education Week (IEW) is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange both worldwide and at UC San Diego. The week is dedicated to enhancing international awareness across campus as well as to spotlighting the importance of the exchange of students and scholars across borders. Initiated in 2000 by the US Department of State and the Department of Education, International Education Week emphasizes the importance of increasing student knowledge and awareness of the world's cultures, peoples and languages, and affirms the critical role that international education and exchange programs play in fostering world peace.

Location: Campuswide
Event Date: Nov 13, 2012 - Nov 16, 2012
Photo By IICAS
Post-Election Roundtable Discussion: Ethnic Politics and the Politics of Immigration Reform
A Roundtable Discussion on the 2012 Presidential Elections: Ethnic Politics and the Politics of Immigration Reform.

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building Conference Room 115, First Floor
Event Date: Nov 13, 2012 - Nov 13, 2012
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Cross-Border Business: Maquiladora Site Visits
Curious about Mexico’s maquiladoras? How have they evolved since NAFTA’s original implementation? Want to understand more about the cross-border business in our mega-region? Join the Institute of the Americas’ Trade Program on November 9 as we take a first-hand look at our border's unique maquiladora industry.

Location: Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Nov 09, 2012 - Nov 09, 2012
Photo By IRPS
Project on the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) Information Session
IGCC is looking for graduate students or advanced undergraduate researchers to work 10 hours/week through the winter quarter, with the possibility of continued work through the spring quarter and the summer depending on job performance. Open to students with native or near-native comprehension of written Chinese.

Location: IR/PS Deans Conference room
Event Date: Nov 07, 2012 - Nov 07, 2012
Photo By Movimiento Tijuana Innovadora
Tijuana Innovadora 2012
The Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies is organizing a trip to Tijuana Innovadora where UCSD students, faculty and staff can experience Tijuana through this unique event. The day's highlights include a tour of the Cultural Center of Tijuana (CECUT) and attendance to a keynote talk by Blake Mycoskie, founder of TOMS Shoes.

Location: Tijuana, Mexico
Event Date: Oct 20, 2012 - Oct 20, 2012
Photo By UCSD Center for US-Mexico Studies
Mexico 2012 Elections Panel
On July 1, 2012, after six years under President Felipe Calderón, Mexico held elections at the national level and in 14 states. The victory by Enrique Peña Nieto and the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) marks the return of the party to the presidency after 12 years. The campaign also highlighted the new role of social media in campaigns which helped foment the #Soy132 movement. The panelists will provide their unique perspectives on the elections as well as the implications for domestic politics and U.S.-Mexican relations. Panelists include: Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Director, Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, UC San Diego Federico Estévez, Professor of Political Science, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Jeffrey Weldon, Professor of Political Science, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México

Location: Institute of the Americas Complex, Weaver Center
Event Date: Oct 18, 2012 - Oct 18, 2012
Photo By Center for US-Mexican Studies
Wayne Cornelius Festschrift
This conference is organized as an informal gathering of friends, mentors, students and scholars who have been marked by the contributions of Wayne Cornelius' work. For almost four decades Wayne's scholarship has decisively impacted the study of the politics of development, migration, democratization, the rule of law and social change in Mexico. He has also been a builder of institutions to facilitate dialogue, public policy engagement and academic exchange. This has deservedly led to his award of the Aguila Azteca, the highest honor bestowed by the Mexican government. The conference is organized around work in progress, personal reflections and roundtable discussions, rather than a formal format of written papers and assigned discussants. It is an opportunity to share with Wayne some of our work and reflections, and to collectively critique and learn from each other.

Location: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas Complex, Weaver Center
Event Date: Oct 17, 2012 - Oct 17, 2012
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Ending Girl Child Marriage: U.N. International Day Event at UC San Diego
This forum features U.N. leaders and Archbishop Desmond Tutu via live webcast from New York, and a discussion with UCSD experts on how to end girl child marriage, which affects the one-in-seven girls worldwide who are married off before age 15. Every day approximately 25,000 girls become child brides. Guest Speaker: Archbishop Desmond Tutu (via webcast), UCSD Profs. Steffanie Strathdee, Anita Raj et al.

Location: Calit2 Auditorium, Atkinson Hall
Event Date: Oct 11, 2012 - Oct 11, 2012
Photo By International Center
International Cafe
FRI 10/5 - Korean Cafe Interact with members of the UC San Diego community from all over the world while eating a delicious meal during our International Café held every Friday during the academic year (weeks 1-10). Everyone and anyone is welcome!

Location: International Center
Event Date: Oct 05, 2012 - Dec 07, 2012
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USMEX, CILAS & LAS Fall 2012 Welcome Reception


Location: Deutz room, Copley International Conference Center Building, at the Institute of the Americas
Event Date: Oct 03, 2012 - Oct 03, 2012
Photo By IICAS
The Competence of Economic Policy-makers in OECD Democracies
The Project on International Affairs (PIA) at the Institute for International, Comparative, and Area Studies (IICAS), and the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation (ILAR) at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS), are pleased to present the fourth annual International Relations Speaker Series. Combining PIA and ILAR efforts, the series features speakers discussing research in the field of international relations, and a wide array of issues, from environment and energy to human rights, and trade and security. Mark Hallerberg Professor, Public Management and Political Economy and Director, Fiscal Governance Centre Hertie School of Governance will speak on the Competence of Economic Policy-makers in OECD Democracies. "The Competence of Economic Policy-makers in OECD Democracies"

Location: Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Bldg. (ERC), Room 115
Event Date: Oct 01, 2012 - Oct 01, 2012
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Revelle Forum: Arts and Culture, Current Events and the Media featuring Slaman Rushdie
Salman Rushdie will discuss his new autobiography Joseph Anton at the Mandeville Center in Revelle College at UC-San Diego (9500 Gilman Dr) from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, September 22. Rushdie was sentenced to death 23 years ago by Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini for his work The Satanic Verses. Joseph Anton is his personal account of "his crucial battle for freedom of speech, the close bonds he formed with his protectors, his struggle for support and understanding, and how he regained his freedom." Rushdie is also famous for his novel Midnight's Children which won the Booker Prize in 1981.

Location: Mandeville Auditorium
Event Date: Sep 22, 2012 - Sep 22, 2012
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IR/PS Open House
Learn how our unique and challenging programs can help you pursue your passion in international affairs and advance your career. The August Open House includes an information session with representatives from IR/PS career services, student affairs, and admissions.

Location: IR/PS Robinson Building Complex room 3201
Event Date: Aug 23, 2012 - Aug 23, 2012
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Investigative Journalism
This workshop will offer training sessions on investigating financial/white-collar crime stories, organized crime, high-profile political figures and environmental abuses, as well as in-depth reporting on breaking, competitive stories. The instructors will be working journalists whose presentations focus on ways to access sensitive information, on interview techniques and presenting investigative data that is both informative and compelling. The workshop will include journalism exercises that are designed as interactive sessions between the participants and the speakers.

Location: Institute of the Americas, 10111 North Torrey Pines Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037
Event Date: Aug 20, 2012 - Aug 24, 2012
Photo By Institute of Americas
Energy Nationalism in Latin America: Myths and Reality
In May Argentina nationalized oil firm YPF. The governments of both Venezuela and Bolivia have greatly increased state control of their energy sectors. In Mexico, energy and nationalism are practically synonymous. Brazil’s state oil company Petrobras is a national icon. But headlines often miss or ignore important myths and realities for Latin America’s energy sector. The discussion will examine energy nationalism in Latin America and insights into the context for energy policy making and what drives governments to intervene in their energy sector.

Location: Institute of the Americas, 10111 North Torrey Pines Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037
Event Date: Aug 16, 2012 - Aug 16, 2012
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Can China Make the Transition to Stable, Balanced Growth?
Barry Naughton, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, is one of the world's top experts on the Chinese economy. His most recent book is The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth, a comprehensive survey of the Chinese economy published by MIT Press in 2007, which has been translated into Chinese and Korean. Naughton has published extensively on four interrelated areas: market transition; industry and technology; foreign trade; and Chinese political economy. His first book, a pioneering study of Chinese economic reform, Growing Out of the Plan: Chinese Economic Reform, 1978-1993 (Cambridge University Press, 1995) won the Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Prize. Naughton publishes extensively in top economics and social science journals. He also publishes regular quarterly analyses of China's economic policy-making online at China Leadership Monitor. Naughton received his Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University in 1986. Naughton was named the So Kuanlok Professor at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego in 1998. He has consulted extensively for the World Bank, as well as for corporate clients. Naughton is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is a non-resident fellow of the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C.

Location: UC San Diego Faculty Club
Event Date: Jul 12, 2012 - Jul 12, 2012
Photo By UCSD Institute of the Americas
Citizens and Crime: Engaging Citizens in Community Security
Engaging Citizens in Community Security will look at successful models in Latin America and elsewhere that involve citizens in the struggle against criminality. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the need to protect citizens while they engage in anti-crime efforts and models for organizing and maintaining group efforts. Successful programs in Colombia and other countries will be studied and guest speakers and leaders of those programs will be invited to facilitate discussion.

Location:
Event Date: Jun 25, 2012 - Jun 29, 2012
Photo By UCSD Institute of the Americas
Bi-national Responses to Pandemics: How the U.S. and Mexico can work together to combat infectious diseases
Dr. Chertorivsky, who worked closely with global health officials during the H1N1 pandemic, will talk about collaborative efforts to fight contagious diseases in the border region. Before being named to the cabinet-level position by President Felipe Calderón in 2011, Dr. Chertorivsky served as national commissioner of Seguro Popular, a program to provide medical care to 49 million Mexicans who do not have access to other government-funded programs. At 11 a.m., Dr. Juan Ramón de la Fuente, who served as Mexico’s Minister of Health in the cabinet of former President Ernesto Zedillo, will speak about the country’s health care reforms. Following their presentation, Gov. Ivonne Ortega Pacheco of Yucatan, Mexico, will discuss her forward-looking health program, as well as efforts by her administration to protect the environment in a state which is home to a national treasure, Chichen Itza.

Location: Institute of the Americas, Hojel Hall of the Americas Auditorium
Event Date: Jun 18, 2012 - Jun 18, 2012
Photo By UCSD Institute of the Americas
Mexico’s Election: Outlook for the Economy and Energy
Mexico heads to the polls on July 1 to elect a new president and congress. Please join us for a conversation and discussion of the election and key economic and energy issues featuring: • Jeffrey Davidow. Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico. • Deborah Riner. Chief Economist, the American Chamber of Commerce of Mexico. • Cecilia Aguillon. Director of Marketing & Government Relations, Kyocera Solar, Inc. • Jeremy Martin. Energy Program Director, Institute of the Americas. The discussion will be moderated by Ambassador Charles Shapiro, president of the Institute of the Americas. These experts will examine issues surrounding this turning point in Mexican history: - The polls in Mexico point to a double digit victory by Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Will the race tighten and be closer than predicted? - If, as predicted, the PRI wins the presidency and a majority in both houses of Congress, will public policy become an easier process to manage? - Will the election cause any shifts or changes in the bilateral relationship between Mexico and the United States? - What is the economic outlook for Latin America’s second largest economy? Is Mexico in a better position now to deal with a global crisis than in 2008? - What does this election mean for Mexico’s energy sector in general and Pemex specifically? - What impact will this election have on renewable energy in Mexico?

Location: Institute of the Americas | Weaver Conference Center
Event Date: Jun 15, 2012 - Jun 15, 2012
Photo By UCSD Institute of the Americas
Michoacán Pottery, Film, and Reception
Please come join us for an exhibit of exquisite lead-free Michoacán pottery and film about how it is made. The pottery will be for sale at the wine reception immediately following the screening of a feature-length documentary about Michoacán potters. During the reception, Omar Foglio, producer, and José Luis Figueroa, co-director, will answer questions about the film and the difficult process of convincing Michoacán artisans to make lead-free pottery. Brilliant Soil focuses on Herlinda Morales, one of the great masters of Mexican folk art. Brilliant Soil, in Spanish with English subtitles, documents the rise of the poor, indigenous women potters of Michoacán who banded together forming Uarhi, the word for woman in the native Purepecha language. Together, they have become respected entrepreneurs and leaders in their communities. The Uarhi movement has spread to 23 communities and 300 women in the most isolated corners of the sierra of Michoacán.

Location: Hojel Auditorium and Arango Foyer, Institute of the Americas, UC San Diego Campus
Event Date: Jun 14, 2012 - Jun 14, 2012
Photo By Birch Aquarium
Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series
The Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series features engaging presentations on research conducted worldwide by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Scripps scientists are exploring Earth’s mysteries in hundreds of research projects under way on every continent.Learn about science at Scripps and join researchers on their paths to discovery. Perspectives lectures are intended for a lay audience. Birch Aquarium admission and parking are included. Light refreshments are served.

Location: Birch Aquarium
Event Date: Jun 09, 2012 - Jun 11, 2012
Photo By CILAS UCSD
The Defeats of Economy Institutions of BRICS Exposed Under the Global Financial Crisis
Recalling the history of human development, social institutions are always in constant change. In accordance with the view of the new institutional economics, institutional change is a decisive factor in economic and social development, which determines the type and manner of development. The most prominent institutional changes have a huge impact on the economies and societies in BRICS since the 1980s. Avoiding a repetition of the global financial crisis in 2008, these New Emerging economies maintain the momentum of high growth, but they are facing the risk of unsustainable export-oriented high-growth mode now, and are being dragged down by the "dollar trap" and "U.S. debt trap". At present, the structural risk has become the biggest challenge of the catch-up economies. Labor input enlargement, capital formation acceleration and the quantitative expansion are mostly taken by these emerging economies under the factor-driven model. The declining export, rising labor costs, currency appreciation, as well as environment, resources, and other bottlenecks make the export-oriented economic, social and political institutions non-adaptable to the new needs of the economic model transition to self-development, and even become obstacles to the building of the new sustainable development model. The focus of this lecture is to explore and analyze the main institutional defeats of BRICS, especially in the property rights, government/market power and path dependence.

Location: Deutz Room in the Copley International Conference Center, Institute of the Americas Complex, UCSD
Event Date: Jun 08, 2012 - Jun 08, 2012
Photo By Birch Aquarium
World Oceans Day Celebration at Scripps Birch Aquarium
It’s time to celebrate our big blue ocean! Celebrate this year’s World Oceans day theme "Oceans of Inspiration" featuring Dr. Seuss’ classic One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish with special activities from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Explore the aquarium in Seussian style as you spot fish with zany names and odd shapes. Learn about fish diversity as you peer through microscopes, touch shark skin and observe swimming fish. Enjoy a fishy scavenger hunt and story times throughout the day. All activities are included with paid aquarium admission.

Location: Birch Aquarium
Event Date: Jun 08, 2012 - Jun 09, 2012
Photo By IICAS UCSD
Moving Beyond Doubt: History, Ideology, and Anthropogenic Climate Change
Naomi Oreskes is Professor of History and Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego, Adjunct Professor of Geosciences at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and an internationally renowned historian of science and author. Having started her career as a geologist, received her B.S. (1st class Honours) from the Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, and then worked for three years as an exploration geologist in the Australian outback. She returned to the United States to receive an inter-disciplinary Ph.D. in geological research and history of science from Stanford University, in 1991. Professor Oreskes has lectured widely in diverse venues ranging from the Madison, Wisconsin Civics Club to the Air Force Research Laboratory, and has won numerous prizes, including, most recently the 2011 Climate Change Communicator of the Year. For the past decade, Professor Oreskes has primarily been interested in the problem of anthropogenic climate change. Her 2004 essay "The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change" (Science 306: 1686) has been widely cited, both in the United States and abroad, including in the Royal Society's publication, "A Guide to Facts and Fictions about Climate Change," in the Academy-award winning film, An Inconveni